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Countryside Jobs Service Professional - The leading monthly for countryside staff across the UK

Published on the second Thursday every month

CJS is endorsed by the Scottish Countryside Rangers Association and the Countryside Management Association

Scottish Countryside Rangers Association

Countryside Management Association

logo: VWT-  Vincent Wildlife Trust 

Featured Charity:  Vincent Wildlife Trust

Find out more about our featured charity here.

Including how to join and donate.

 

 

Please remember: If you are interested in a particular advert or item please contact the advertiser, not CJS, and remember to tell them you saw their advert in CJS Professional.


Contents:

Click the headers to browse each section, or click on each item (or the [more] button)

 

Jobs

Title

Employer

Location (basis / contract details)

Senior Project Development & Funding Officer

North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Hungerford, Berkshire (Permanent Full-time)

Project Officer 

North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Hungerford, Berkshire (Permanent Full-time)

Project Manager

Central Scotland Green Network Trust

Shotts, North Lanarkshire

Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Community Engagement Project Officer

Kent Wildlife Trust

Based in the Sevenoaks area with office facilities at Sevenoaks District Council Offices.(Fixed Term for 4 Years - part time, 2 days per week (15 hours))

Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Conservation and Access Project Officer

Kent Wildlife Trust

Based in the Sevenoaks area with office facilities at Sevenoaks District Council Offices. (Fixed Term for 4 Years - part time, 4 days per week (30 hours))

Estate Worker/Groundsman

Historic private estate

South Oxford 

Estate Forester

Lour Farms

Forfar

Crane Valley Partnership Manager 

Crane Valley Partnership

Crane catchment, near Heathrow

(Initially offered as a 15 month (home working) fixed term contract)

Project Director 

Wychwood Project

West Oxfordshire

Countryside Ranger

Finlaystone Estate

Langbank, Renfrewshire (5 days a week 8:30-5:00 which will include some weekends)

Forest Manager

Scottish Woodlands

Central Scotland, Perth.

Graduate Opportunities: Forestry Management & Havesting

Scottish Woodlands

Across Scotland

Havesting Managers

Scottish Woodlands

South Scotland (Newtown St Boswell) and North Scotland (Fochabers)

Wildlife Conservation Works Site Lead

Wild Service (Wildlife Trusts Consultants)

Gloucester

Assistant Conservation Officer, Planning

Surrey Wildlife Trust

Surrey, (21 hours, flexible weekdays)

Forest Surveyor 

Forestry Commission England

Bedgebury Office, Cranbrook, TN17 2SL (Fixed Term 3 years)

Uplands Team Support Officer

Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust

Eggleston, Co. Durham (Permanent, full time, 37.5 hours p/w)

Rural SuDS Project Officer   

Stroud District Council

Stroud (37hrs per week, 24-month FTC)

Area Head of Business Development

The Land Trust

M4 Corridor Office based in Bristol or Aldershot with substantial travel

Landscape Estimator

The Land Trust

Warrington Office with national travel

Apprenticeships

Conservation Placements

Yorkshire Wildlife Trust 

Appleton-le-Moors near Kirkbymoorside, N Yorks (4 day week - 12 month placement)

Volunteers

Charnwood Forest Landscape Partnership - Independent Chair of Steering Group

Charnwood Forest Landscape Partnership

time commitment of approximately 1 day per month

Volunteer Farm Officer / Tutor 

Hillcrescent Farm

Water Orton, North Warwickshire

Training

MSc Ecosystem Services Evaluation and has funding for three MSc Research Projects 

University of Cumbria

 

Volunteers

Charnwood Forest Landscape Partnership seeks an Independent Chair of Steering Group time commitment of approximately 1 day per month

Volunteer Farm Officer / Tutor at Hillcrescent Farm in Water Orton, North Warwickshire

 

Surveys and Fieldwork

Six new and updated listings including: Tawny Owl Point Survey, The Big Wasp Survey and Heather Beetle.

Full details of all listings are now automatically included in our daily email updates and shared through social media as well as here in CJS Professional and in CJS Weekly.  Add yours to our listings here, 50 word linage is free.

 

CJS Focus

CJS Focus on Volunteering in association with TCV will be published on Monday.

The next edition will be published on Monday 19 November  and is looking at: Employabilty. 

Check back on Monday to read the latest edition which will be included in full in next month's edition of CJS Professional.

Enquire about CJS Focus  (or make suggestions for future editions) by contacting Amy here

 

CJS Information and other articles

Featured Charity

We'll be introducing our next charity later this year, if your organisation would like to be our featured charity please contact us to find out what's involved and what CJS can offer you. Readers you may nominate your chosen charity as well, we do have a short list in mind but are always open to suggestions. Email suggestions and requests to Kerryn on Kerryn@countryside-jobs.com

 

Website upgrade

Having (almost) finished the CV listing site countryside-careers.com we're in the process of drawing up a brief for our web designer to overhaul the CJS site (clean pages, more pictures, simplified navigation, drop unused pages etc…..) and we'd like your suggestions. We've quite a few from last year's survey but we're always open to ideas.  So if there's something that really bugs you or maybe there's something you really like please let us know and we'll add your thoughts to ours.  We've got a few new features up our sleeves too but again suggestions please.  Email us your ideas and feedback.

Our web designer has decided that instead of the facelift we were planning he thinks we should upgrade EVERYTHING! so it will take a bit longer than we initially planned for but it does mean that, within reason, anything is possible - so let your imagination run riot!

 

News

Hey, look it's lots of little CJs!  10,000 snails - BIAZA 

Land and Countryside Management

  • 2018 Park Protector shortlist announced! - Campaign for National Parks
  • Eye in the sky reveals hidden alien invaders – SNH
  • Cumbria habitats surveyed for first time but not so good an outbreak of ash dieback - Yorkshire Dales National Park
  • National Park seeks seed collectors for major tree project - North York Moors National Park

Funding and new partnerships

  • £900k awarded to engage young people with heritage parks - Groundwork
  • Threatened sand dunes given a new lease of LIFE – Natural England

Pollution, sustainablity and climate

  • Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil say experts – University of Manchester
  • Survey reveals littering is on the increase – Keep Britain Tidy

Environmental Education, Recreation and health

  • Land Trust launches new education strategy to inspire young people to get outdoors - The Land Trust
  • “Missed opportunity” for Welsh Government to improve public access – Cycling UK

Scientific Research, Results and Publications

  • Bird Surveyors help to shed new light on changing mammal populations - BTO
  • Red light at night: A potentially fatal attraction to migratory bats - Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
  • Newly sequenced golden eagle genome will help its conservation - Wellcome Sanger Institute
  • New research throws light on factors associated with the decline of Britain’s hedgehogs - People's Trust for Endangered Species

Animal and wildlife news

  • University and Chester Zoo join forces to fight global extinction of threatened species - University of Manchester
  • Native crayfish make a comeback in Lincolnshire - Environment Agency
  • It's been a good year dfor birds with a Record number of hen harrier chicks tagged roseate tern enjoying itsmost sucussful nesting season - RSPB 
  • Pine marten returning to Kielder Water & Forest Park - Forestry Commission

 

Training

University of Cumbria is advertising an  MSc Ecosystem Services Evaluation and has funding for three MSc Research Projects .

Three exciting and practical MSc environmental research projects. 

  • Landscape Character Assessment Monitoring Techniques Appraisal and Ground Truthing in the Lake District National Park
  • Preventing the Spread of Invasive Non-Native Species by Identifying the Pathways of Introduction.
  • Model the life-cycle impact of a new product, the portable ecosystem concept.

Full advert includes introductory video here.

 

Calendar of events and short courses occuring in November - 15 pages

Plus additions to long courses and providers made over the past month.

 

Grants and sources of funding

Details five new and updated listings.

  

CJS Newsletters and updates:

CJS Weekly: subscription only weekly newsletter. Receive details of all vacancies and information advertised with CJS. Find out more here. Instant access here.

Daily email with details of latest vacancies, news and general information. Sign up free here.


 

CJS Professional: 13 September 2018

Jobs: view all online jobs here

 

Logo: North Wessex Downs AONBSenior Project Development & Funding Officer 

North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Permanent Full-time

£30,756-£33,136 pa

Hungerford, Berkshire 

About the Role

We’re looking for an experienced Senior Project Development & Funding Officer to join our small, friendly team. The North Wessex Downs AONB is the 3rd largest in the country covering over 1,700 sq. kms. AONBs are currently in the spotlight. In England, the 25 Year Environment Plan recognises the contribution these areas make to the nation and challenged them to do more. In addition, government has commenced a review of English AONBs and National Parks creating an exciting opportunity to develop landscape management and ensure the AONB designation is well placed to deliver for 21st century post-Brexit Britain. 

You will develop and manage partnerships to deliver priority projects and initiatives in support of the aims, policies and actions of the North Wessex Downs AONB Management Plan, the work programme, the Corporate Strategy and the AONB prospectus. 

You will research, identify and secure match funding, sponsorship and in-kind support from a wide range of potential funding sources, including commercial sponsorship, corporate support, charitable trusts and private giving. The income generation through fees and sales is another area for development. 

There are opportunities to work with and advise community interests groups and others on identifying and developing funding applications and to promote public participation and raise awareness of the special qualities of the North Wessex Downs through specific events and consultations. 

About You

The successful candidate will be a highly motivated and creative thinker with the ability to act independently seizing opportunities to develop project and funding initiatives working as part of a small team. 

You will be an outstanding project manager with experience of working at a strategic level, delivering high quality outcomes to tight deadlines and forging effective partnerships to deliver them. You will have a degree or equivalent, preferably in an environment, project development and fundraising field. 

As a Senior Project Development and Funding Officer, you will have a track record of fundraising from both the public and private sector sources at six-figure sums and above and be able to confidently operating at a national and strategic level both communities and businesses. 

An excellent communicator, you will be able to explain complex information and ideas to a wide range of audiences. You are a consummate networker successfully engaging with elected members, business leaders, senior managers and the general public and visitors to the North Wessex Downs. 

For more details and to apply click here  

Closing date: 2nd October 2018


Logo: North Wessex Downs AONBProject Officer 

North Wessex Downs Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB)

Permanent Part-time 15 hrs per week

£23,111-£25,463 pro rata

Hungerford, Berkshire 

We’re looking for an experienced Project Officer to join our small, friendly team  

About the Role

The North Wessex Downs AONB is the 3rd largest in the country covering over 1,700 sq. kms 

Working as part a small team and with the Senior Project Development & Funding Officer you will contribute or lead on funding bids to external funders, both commercial sponsors and others. 

You will deliver projects in support of the Management Plan and associated strategies, plans and guidance. Additionally, you will manage specific grants or other funding, ensuring compliance with grant conditions and report to funders as required. 

We will look to you to plan, organise and run events and presentations to a wide variety of stakeholders as part of project and bid development and project delivery and to raise the profile of the North Wessex Downs. 

About You 

As a Project Officer, you will work well as part of a small team with experience of partnership working and managing environmental projects. 

The successful candidate must be organised, motivated, able to organise tasks and manage competing demands with limited supervision and to deadlines. A creative thinker, you will be able to identify innovative ways of delivering objectives. 

You must have excellent communication skills and can present information to a wide range of audiences. 

For more details and to apply click here

Closing date: 24th September 2018 


Logo: Central Scotland Green Network TrustProject Manager

(Salary circa £25k) 

The Central Scotland Green Network Trust leads an initiative to change the face of Central Scotland, by improving the landscape from Ayrshire and Inverclyde in the west, to Fife and the Lothians in the east. Our vision is to transform Central Scotland into a place where the environment adds value to the economy and where people’s lives are enriched by its quality. 

At the Central Scotland Green Network Trust we do things differently: we believe in balancing life and work; we work flexibly; we invest in our people by offering training and support and, above all, we value our staff. 

The successful candidate will manage a range of environmental improvement projects. These projects will include habitat enhancements, creating new community gardens, greenspaces and woodlands as well as building new and upgrading existing path routes. 

Applications are sought from individuals with a degree in Landscape Architecture, Forestry or another relevant land based qualification who have a track record of managing and overseeing environmental projects. Applicants must have excellent communication skills, be computer literate and preferably confident in using AutoCAD or GIS. We are looking for an individual who is solution-orientated, motivated by their work and has enthusiasm for improving the environment.  

This is a permanent position based at our office in Shotts, North Lanarkshire. Travel within Central Scotland will be required; a clean driving licence and access to a car are essential. 

Application Process 

Make our recruitment greener by downloading your application form here. Additional information about CSGNT and the appointment is also available for download.  

Please send your completed application form along with your CV and any other supporting material in PDF format to recruitment@csgnt.org.uk 

The closing date for applications is 9:00am, 08 October 2018

Interviews will be held on 23 October 2018  

For particular queries relating to the post, please contact recruitment@csgnt.org.uk


Logo: Kent Wildlife TrustJob Opportunity - Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Community Engagement Project Officer

Fixed Term for 4 Years - part time, 2 days per week (15 hours)

Closing Date:       Monday 17th September 2018                                        

Interview Date: Thursday 27th/Friday 28th September 2018

Please note interviews will be held at Sevenoaks District Council Offices, Argyle Rd, Sevenoaks, TN13 1HG             

Salary:  Point 13-16 on the salary scale, currently £25,330 - £27,844 (pro rata)

Based in the Sevenoaks area with office facilities at Sevenoaks District Council Offices.

We are looking for a Community Engagement Officer to lead on the community engagement elements of the Delivery Stage of the HLF Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Project. The project aims include the restoration, enhancement and community engagement of the natural and landscape heritage of the Sevenoaks Greensand Commons (SGC). You will be responsible for the planning and delivery of engagement activities with a wide range of audiences from schools/young people to organisations such as those working with older people with Alzheimer’s and dementia, and care homes.

This is an exciting, innovative project delivering a range of outcomes for the wildlife, landscape and social heritage for communities in and around Sevenoaks. You will be responsible for leading this work and supporting volunteer input where appropriate, ensuring the delivery of the project on time and on budget.

The project work includes restoration of heathland and wood pasture habitats, and work on improving access to the commons, both physical and intellectual. A creative approach to community engagement in the widest sense will underpin this work. The ability to make and maintain productive working relationships with existing and new contacts, including volunteers and partners will be essential. Supporting the development of local Friends of Groups over the 4 years of the project is also a key objective.

You will work closely with the Project Manager and an established, strong and supportive steering group, Sevenoaks District Council (SDC) and KWT staff, stakeholders and delivery partners. This includes skilled and enthusiastic local volunteers with a wide range of specialisms encouraging the furthering and sharing of the fantastic resources of the commons.

You: To be considered for this fantastic role, in a great team, in a fantastic setting, you MUST be able to demonstrate the following: • Proven significant relevant experience in education, youth work, community development project work. • An understanding of national curriculum, education policy and thinking, and best practise in working with young people. • A qualification to degree level or equivalent in a relevant subject (education, youth work, community development, ecology, environment, countryside management, heritage), or qualified by experience. • Demonstrable experience of presentation skills, public speaking and work with the media and experience of working with a variety of stakeholders. • Demonstrable ability to work on your own initiative and as part of a team.

Contact details:

For an informal discussion about the post please contact Dave Hutton on 01622 662012 

Logo: Health Lottery FundLogo: Sevenoaks District CouncilFor an application pack, visit our website here    

Kent Wildlife Trust has a positive approach to equality and welcomes applications from all sectors of the community


Logo: Kent Wildlife TrustJob Opportunity - Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Conservation and Access Project Officer

Fixed Term for 4 Years - part time, 4 days per week (30 hours)

Closing Date:    Monday 17th September 2018                           

Interview Date: Thursday 27th/Friday 28th September 2018

Please note interviews will be held at Sevenoaks District Council Offices, Argyle Rd, Sevenoaks, TN13 1HG

Salary:  Point 13-16 on the salary scale, currently £25,330 - £27,844 (pro rata)

Based in the Sevenoaks area with office facilities at Sevenoaks District Council Offices.

We are looking for a Conservation and Access Officer to lead on the Delivery Stage of the HLF Sevenoaks Greensand Commons Project for the restoration, enhancement and community engagement of the natural and landscape heritage of the Sevenoaks Greensand Commons (SGC), responsible for the delivery of project conservation and access works.

This is an exciting, innovative project delivering a range of outcomes for the wildlife, landscape and social heritage for communities in and around Sevenoaks. You will be responsible for leading this work using both contractors and volunteers ensuring the delivery of the project on time and on budget.  The conservation work includes restoration of heathland and wood pasture habitats, and work on  improving access to the commons, both physical and intellectual. A creative approach to community engagement in the widest sense will underpin this work. The ability to make and maintain productive working relationships with existing and new contacts, including volunteers and partners will be essential. Supporting the development of local Friends of Groups over the 4 years of the project is also a key objective.

You will work closely with an established, strong and supportive steering group, Sevenoaks District Council (SDC) and KWT staff, stakeholders and delivery partners. This includes skilled and enthusiastic local volunteers with a wide range of specialisms encouraging the furthering and sharing of the fantastic resources of the commons.

You: To be considered for this fantastic role, in a great team, in a fantastic setting, you MUST be able to demonstrate the following: • A proven track record of planning and delivering conservation and access works with both contractors and volunteers. • Proven significant relevant experience in conservation/environmental/heritage/community project work (management or development), an understanding of current nature conservation policy and thinking, and the principles of landscape ecology and an understanding of conservation land management. • Experience of wildlife monitoring and a willingness to support volunteers in setting up survey work. • Demonstrable experience of presentation skills, public speaking and work with the media and experience of working with a variety of stakeholders.  • Demonstrable ability to work on your own initiative and as part of a team.

Contact details:

For an informal discussion about the post please contact Dave Hutton on 01622 662012 

Logo: Health Lottery FundLogo: Sevenoaks District CouncilFor an application pack, visit our website here     

Kent Wildlife Trust has a positive approach to equality and welcomes applications from all sectors of the community


Estate Worker/Groundsman

South Oxford 

An exciting opportunity has arisen for an experienced Estate worker/Groundsman to join our team on a historic private estate south of oxford.  

The Grade II * listed manor house has 11 acres of gardens including Italianate formal gardens, herbaceous borders, terraces, a large formal pool, wildlife ponds, a dell, woodland and orchard areas, glasshouses and a number of outbuildings. The gardens and buildings are currently undergoing extensive renovations and improvements. In addition to two part-time gardeners, the estate is managed by a skilled full time Head Gardener who will require assistance with gardening tasks such as mowing, strimming and hedge cutting. The Head Gardener welcomes enthusiasm and the desire to learn, so keen gardeners with well-rounded practical estate management skills are invited to apply and additional support and training will be provided to extend the practical horticultural skill set of any applicant. The remainder of the duties of the role consist of non-horticultural tasks, i.e. garden machinery maintenance, DIY/handyman tasks, pet care, occasional driving etc.  

Applicants for the position should have previous experience of maintenance, caretaking and security on private estates as well as solid groundsman knowledge. Experience in the use and maintenance of horticultural machinery, strong practical and DIY skills are all essential. The successful candidate will need to maintain effective communications with Head Gardener; Owners; Visitors and Contractors and understand and undertake a cost effective approach to maintenance. A competitive salary will be based on levels of experience. The position could be either live in or live out.  

Estate duties: Use and Maintenance of Equipment and Machinery. DIY, Repairs and Maintenance. Leaf clearing, drive raking, garden gate maintenance. Provide efficient and effective support service to the estate at all times and liaising with contractors occasionally. Lawn care and mowing on a range of grass types including formal lawns and wild flower meadows. Strimming. Weeding. Maintenance of ponds and pools. Maintenance of hand tools. Pruning and hedge cutting including care of formal parterre. Care of summer and spring bedding schemes. Border maintenance and renovations. 

Gardening duties: Lawn care and mowing on a range of grass types including formal lawns and wild flower meadows. Strimming. Weeding. Maintenance of ponds and pools. Maintenance of hand tools. Pruning and hedge cutting including care of formal parterre. Care of summer and spring bedding schemes. Border maintenance and renovations. 

Essentials 

Previous experience in using tractors, ride-on and pedestrian mowers, strimming, hedge cutting and a good knowledge of machinery maintenance and repairs. Experience in private estate work. Clean driving licence. Excellent interpersonal and communication skills. Respectful of client’s privacy and security. Good problem solving and handyman skills. DBS certificate. A horticultural qualification. PA1/PA6 spraying certificate. Chainsaw licence Desirable   

Please contact Sam Wilson on samwilsongarsingtonmanor@yahoo.com with a CV & covering letter.


Lour Farms

Estate Forester

Due to retirement, an opportunity exists to join our team as Estate Forester.

Lour Estate (2,000ac) is maintained to a very high standard throughout, is well equipped with a full range of modern machinery & offers excellent staff facilities. 

Applicants must be flexible, adaptable and have relevant experience in estate maintenance including fencing & forestry. The applicant will also be responsible for the maintenance of amenity grassland, ponds, hedges etc. throughout the estate. Further variety is offered through key involvement with small building projects etc. 

If you have the skills, enjoy variety, can manage an assistant & like working on your own initiative, then the post offers excellent job satisfaction. 

An attractive detached c/h cottage will be provided within 2.5mls of Forfar. Training can be provided where necessary. 

Apply in writing with CV to:- Mr. M.W. Cumming, Lour Estate Office, Ladenford, Forfar, DD8 2LF or email mike@lourfarms.co.uk. Visit our website at www.lourfarms.co.uk


Logo: Crane Valley PartnershipCrane Valley Partnership Manager 

The role will suit a natural leader and good communicator who is personable, diplomatic and passionate about rivers; a good level of river enrichment technical knowledge will also be required. Initially offered as a 15 month (home working) fixed term contract, it is hoped that this would be extended subject to funding being secured. This is an exciting opportunity to make a real difference to the environment. 

The Partnership currently has 23 partner organisations that work in collaboration to deliver a variety of catchment-based projects, including river enhancements, monitoring, volunteer events, education and engagement, etc. 

The two major projects will also play a significant role within the landscape and management of the Crane catchment in the next few years/decades, namely Thames Water’s ‘Smarter Water Catchments’ (of which the Crane is the urban pilot catchment), and the proposed Heathrow Airport third runway expansion, which will have a considerable impact on the Crane catchment. The Development Manager, along with other parties, will have a notable role in both. 

The Crane catchment has been included as the pilot urban catchment for the Thames Water ‘Smarter Water Catchment’ approach, which will start in 2020 with the commencement of the seventh Asset Management Period (AMP7). The Development Manager will work closely with Thames Water and the other CVP partners to prepare for project work to commence once AMP7 start. 

The proposed Heathrow Airport third runway expansion plans will also impact the Crane catchment significantly. 

This post is responsible for the strategic development, expansion and implementation of the Crane Valley Partnership and to support the Partners in the core objectives of the Partnership:

  • To raise awareness and support action for conservation, restoration and new approaches to design and management of the River Valley.
  • To help communities take a sustainable approach to managing and improving the River Crane and its tributaries.
  • To improve and protect the biodiversity of the area.
  • To maximise the use of the river corridor as a resource for healthier living and educational activities for local people.
  • To promote connectivity along the river corridor.

The successful candidate will work across the Crane Catchment with partner organisations to develop, fundraise and enable delivery of agreed priority projects and themes in order to deliver a better environment for people and wildlife across the Crane Catchment. 

Please email a cover letter and CV to Tim Knight (tim@greencorridor.org.uk) by 5pm deadline on 21st September.

Interviews will be held in Richmond on 11th October. 

Job Types: Full-time, Contract

Salary: £27,000.00 to £32,000.00 / year


Logo: Wychwood ProjectProject Director 

The Wychwood Project is a registered charity which encourages and supports the conservation and restoration of landscapes and habitats within the former historic royal hunting Forest of Wychwood, covering 120 square miles of West Oxfordshire. 

We are looking for a dynamic individual as Project Director (effectively Chief Executive) of the charity to deliver the aims and objectives of the Wychwood Project, encapsulated in a five-year strategic plan. Responsibilities will include: securing continued funding for, and leading on the implementation of, practical conservation, learning and business development activities; overseeing the management of Wychwood Project’s land assets; managing a staff of four; maintaining links with landowners, communities, businesses and individuals in the Wychwood Project area, including a membership of c 600 local people, and generally raising awareness of the Wychwood Project in the local area and beyond. 

The right candidate will have the leadership qualities necessary to build on the success of previous Project Directors. These will include: fundraising ability; knowledge of nature conservation; and experience of initiating and running projects. They will understand the management needs of membership organisations, the charitable sector and they will have proven ability to work with a wide range of stakeholders, partners and volunteers, inspiring people to work towards shared goals.   

This is an exciting opportunity to play a key role in a dynamic and developing charity. 

Salary in the region of £35,000 pa (more may be available for an exceptional candidate). 

For further information please visit www.wychwoodproject.org or contact our current Project Director at info@wychwoodproject.org.uk 

Closing date: 9am Monday 1 October


Countryside Ranger for Finlaystone Estate 

Finlaystone Estate is a leading visitor attraction by Langbank, Renfrewshire (18 miles from Glasgow)  with extensive woodlands, formal gardens and children’s activities all year round. For more details see finlaystone.co.uk

We are looking for a well organised person who is keen to get involved in all ranger related activities and who is also able to carry out maintenance and repair work to a reasonable standard. You must be fit enough to carry out strimming and other woodland work and enjoy working with and inspiring groups of children. You will ideally be able to carry out basic joinery and painting jobs as well as path maintenance. A chainsaw certificate would also be useful. 

You will be part of a permanent team of five on the estate. Depending on your specific skills, some on-the-job training will be carried out.

Hours - 5 days a week 8:30-5:00 which will include some weekends. 

Initial Salary about £16,000 per annum depending on experience and skills but scope to improve on this. 

CV and contact details please to Arthur MacMillan at arthur@finlaystone.com 


Logo: Central Scotland Green NetworkCentral Canals Development Officer

Two Year Fixed Term Post

(Salary circa £26,000 - £29,000) 

The Central Scotland Green Network (CSGN) seeks to change the face of central Scotland, by restoring and transforming the landscape of an area stretching from Ayrshire and Inverclyde in the west, to Fife and the Lothians in the east. 

Working in partnership with Kelvin Valley & Falkirk LEADER and West Lothian LEADER Local Action Groups, Scottish Canals, Sustrans, CSGNT and many other stakeholders we are seeking to develop a Canal Visitor Strategy while supporting and engaging with other central Scotland visitor destinations such as the John Muir Way, The Kelpies, The Falkirk Wheel and the Antonine Wall.  

We are looking for an experienced individual to lead on wider stakeholder enjoyment who will work with a wide partnership group to produce the Visitor Engagement Strategy and Action Plan.  

Applications are sought from motivated individuals with a track record of development of initiatives and/or other projects, particularly involving managed visitor destinations.   

This is a two year fixed term post (35 hours per week) based in our offices in Shotts, North Lanarkshire.  It is also expected that the successful applicant will spend a proportion of their time travelling to various destinations including managed visitor attractions and stakeholders in the Central Canal area.  We offer flexible working arrangements.  Travel within central Scotland will be required; a clean driving license and access to a car are essential. 

Application Process

Make our recruitment greener by downloading your application form here

Additional information about CSGNT and the appointment is also available. 

Please send your completed application form along with your CV and any other supporting material in PDF format to recruitment@csgnt.org.uk 

The closing date for applications is midnight on Monday, 17 September 2018.  

Interviews will be held on Thursday, 27 September 2018. 

For particular queries relating to the post, please contact recruitment@csgnt.org.uk  

This post is being financed by the Scottish Government and the European Community LEADER 2014 – 2020 Programme (Kelvin Valley and Falkirk LEADER and West Lothian LEADER Local Action Groups)



Logo: Wild ServiceWildlife Conservation Works Site Lead

Salary: negotiable, dependent on skills and experience

Closing date: 21st September 2018

Location: Gloucester  

Wild Service aim to provide an exceptional level of service in the delivery of habitat improvement, environmental mitigation, wildlife conservation and other land management projects to benefit the region’s wildlife, and now need urgently to expand our Land Management team to keep pace with a buoyant order book. 

We are seeking to appoint a Site Lead to undertake a variety of practical works at one or more of our ever-changing list of client sites and, as necessary, oversee other staff, suppliers, and sub-contractors and liaise with clients. Travel across the region will be required for this role, so a full driving licence is essential. Relevant equipment certificates are desirable, though training will be given for the right candidate. 

If you are interested in joining our team and have a broad range of practical skills and experience and the commitment to make a difference in a fast paced and varied environment, please go to our website to download a full job description and apply. 


Logo: Surrey Wildlife TrustAssistant Conservation Officer, Planning

£20,000 fte pa, pro rata to hours worked

21 hours, flexible weekdays 

Would you like to have a pivotal role in protecting Surrey’s wildlife and landscapes for future generations? 

 Do you have the passion, commitment and skills to work with us and our local authority partners to deliver this mission?   

We have a vacancy for an Assistant Conservation Officer to work within the team providing ecological advice to Local Authority planning case officers on development proposals which could affect important species and habitats. 

Ecological qualifications are essential as are good communication skills; previous experience with planning issues and Local Authorities exposure would be an advantage.   

Application form and full job profile on our website or contact Ken Anckorn at ken.anckorn@surreywt.org.uk   

Closing Date: midday 21.09.18 


Logo: Forestry CommissionForest Surveyor 

£23,293 - £24,633 

Fixed Term 3 years 

Bedgebury Office, Cranbrook, TN17 2SL  

Forestry Commission England is seeking a self-motivated person who can work independently or in a team to carry out forest inventory surveys across the south-eastern part of East England Forest District (Kent & E. Sussex). The post will be based at the Bedgebury Pinetum in Kent and has both field and office based elements with the ideal candidate being able to carry out a range of forest surveys including; identifying tree species and woodland components; accurately gathering data in the field using GPS and translating this data into an inventory via GIS. 

Closing date: 30 September 2018. 

For further information and to apply click here  


Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust

Uplands Team Support Officer  

Location: Eggleston, Co. Durham

Salary: £16,000 to £20,000 per annum

Status: Permanent, full time, 37.5 hours p/w plus pension, medical insurance and 22+ days holiday  

The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust has a small Uplands team based in Teesdale, Co. Durham, with additional out-posted staff in Scotland and the Yorkshire Dales. We are seeking a Support Officer for this team to provide a wide range of office support duties. Subject to post-holder competencies, there may also be a requirement to assist with some field-based duties (e.g. data recording, assisting with ecological surveys) at certain times of year. 

We require: 

   ●   Strong communication skills    ●   Good working knowledge of Windows 7 / 10 & Microsoft Office 2016    ●   Reliability, integrity and attention to detail   ●   Clean driving licence. 

Please apply by sending a CV and cover letter with details of two referees to Dr David Baines, Director of Uplands Research (dbaines@gwct.org.uk), placing ‘Uplands Team Support Officer’ in the e-mail subject line. 

Closing date for applications: 1st October 2018

Selected candidates will be interviewed on October 11th 

For further information about this position please click here or email Alastair King (aking@gwct.org.uk). 


Logo: Stroud District CouncilStroud District Council

Rural SuDS Project Officer   

£30,756 p.a.  

37hrs per week, 24-month FTC (Possible extension subject to funding)    

Stroud District is renowned as an area not only of extraordinary natural beauty but also of exceptionally diverse environments, from the rolling hills of the Cotswolds, via the flood plains of the Severn to the ports of the Bristol Estuary.     

The Stroud Rural SuDS project was established in May 2014 as a partnership between SDC, the Environment Agency and the local community. It has established an award winning reputation as an exemplar Natural Flood Management (NFM) project, delivering over 400 NFM interventions working with a wide range of landowners and stakeholders.  Further information on the project can be found on our website.  The post is currently funded by the English Severn & Wye Regional Flood and Coastal Committee until October 2020, but it is our intention to seek additional funding to enable the project to be extended.    

We are looking for a Project Officer who has the skills and qualities to build on the success of the project and contribute to securing its long term future.   You will need to have:    

   ●   experience of working with community groups and in partnership with other stakeholders including landowners, statutory agencies and NGO’s   ●   the ability to communicate effectively across a range of media and audiences   ●   a passion for rural development and environmental protection   ●   an understanding of the principles of Natural Flood Management/RSuDS   ●   experience of environmental project delivery   

The 37-hour working week is flexible between 7am and 10pm, Mon-Sun, and the role will involve frequent out-of-hours and weekend work.   

For an informal discussion please contact Maria Hickman, Housing Renewal Manager, on 01453 754454.   

To find out more, and to apply, visit:  www.stroud.gov.uk/jobs    

Closing Date:                Midnight Sunday 23rd September 2018      

Interview Dates:             Friday 5th October 2018    

We are committed to equality of opportunity and welcome applications from all sections of the community. 


Logo: The Land TrustAre you passionate about placemaking? 

The Land Trust believes that well managed green infrastructure is the key ingredient in creating sustainable, healthy and vibrant communities. We have two vacancies to support our vision. 

Area Head of Business Development

Southern England

M4 Corridor Office based in Bristol or Aldershot with substantial travel

£40,000 - £45,000 per annum 

This role is one of three Regional Roles for the UK (including Scotland and Wales), helping to acquire land with associated funding from public and private sector organisations  primarily through endowment and service charge funding helping deliver the Land Trust’s charitable objectives through new acquisitions. 

Must have a track record of successfully identifying and converting land based development leads into deliverable projects from a range of clients and developing and managing relationships at senior level with partners. Able to demonstrate an understanding of the property and residential development market and commercial viability to meet annual targets and negotiate appropriate transactions.  

For full details of the Job Description and Person Specification visit www.thelandtrust.org.uk 

Apply with CV and covering letter to recruitment@thelandtrust.org.uk 

Closing date for applications: 9am on Wednesday 3rd October 2018. 

Interviews to be held in Warrington on 19th October


Logo: The Land TrustAre you passionate about placemaking? 

The Land Trust believes that well managed green infrastructure is the key ingredient in creating sustainable, healthy and vibrant communities. We have two vacancies to support our vision. 

Landscape Estimator

Warrington Office

with national travel

£25,000 to £30,000 per annum 

This is a newly created position within the Trust, to coordinate and provide bespoke costings for specific tendering opportunities to support the Business Development Team. 

Must have a track record of estimating varied projects from within landscaping industries and compiling and securing tenders for estate landscape type related work. Able to meet deadlines, have excellent mathematical ability and attention to detail.  

Benefits include - 6% matched contributory pension scheme and 25–30 days holiday plus bank holidays. 

For full details of the Job Description and Person Specification visit www.thelandtrust.org.uk 

Apply with CV and covering letter to recruitment@thelandtrust.org.uk 

Closing date for applications: 9am on Wednesday 3rd October 2018. 

Interviews to be held in Warrington on 17th October.  


Apprenticeships

Conservation Placements available with Yorkshire Wildlife Trust 

Are you aged 24 or under? Are you looking to grow your career in conservation?

If so then we would like to hear from you. 

The Yorkshire Wildlife Trust has opportunities available at Appleton-le-Moors near Kirkbymoorside.  

We are looking for 3 passionate and motivated young people to join the Tomorrow’s Natural Leaders programme.  As part of the programme we help build your practical skills, conservation knowledge, leadership skills and employability in the conservation & environmental sector. This will be achieved through a 4 day week - 12 month placement carrying out a wide range of activities such as; reserves management, habitat restoration, biodiversity monitoring, events management, campaigning, species surveys, livestock management and outreach & education.  

In return you will receive benefits including a bursary of £250 per month, a £480 training budget and a £500 completion bonus.  

Applications for this exciting opportunity are open now so please click here, ring the office: 01904 659570 or e-mail paul.thompson@ywt.org.uk for your chance to be a part of the future in environmental conservation.  

YWT Company 409650; Charity no. 210807.


 

Click here to find out how to advertise your job in CJS Professional and reach 100,000+ fellow professionals.

 

Volunteers.

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Volunteers: 47 adverts for voluntary posts added this month  see all of these online at: http://www.countryside-jobs.com/vols

  

Charnwood Forest Landscape Partnership - Independent Chair of Steering Group  

Are you a respected leader in business, public or charitable sector with an interest in landscape and conservation? Charnwood Forest Landscape Partnership is looking to recruit an Independent Chair of its Steering Group to assist with the development of a £3.9 million HLF-funded project. 

We are looking for an ambassador for the Partnership who can effectively manage a steering group of varied partner organisations and support them in their development of this innovative scheme. The successful candidate will be able to facilitate effective decision-making by the partners and will have the capacity to provide enthusiasm, drive and independent advice during the preparation of the final application for HLF funding, to be submitted in October 2019.  

This is a voluntary role with a time commitment of approximately 1 day per month.   

For further details please click here for the Project Pack and Application Details  


Hillcrescent Farm

Volunteer Farm Officer / Tutor 

Location:              Water Orton, North Warwickshire

Benefits:               Training, possible voluntary job share, possible livery.

Closing Date:        Ongoing 

The role will require the farm officer/tutor to lead small groups of vulnerable people with learning difficulties, mental health issues and autism, in a range of animal related activities based on our educational farm. These include- horse care, agricultural animals, conservation and small animal care. Outside of the tutor role you will also help to look after the small farm, its animals and facilities.  

Teaching experience would be favourable along with animal related husbandry and passion for working with vulnerable people is essential. Training and support will be provided. Long term commitment is also desired. DBS essential.  

We hope this role would give excellent teaching experience, experience working with a range of learner groups in the outdoor/farm class room and help the right candidate pursue a teaching career, animal/outdoor related discipline and give a good grounding with working with SEN individuals.  

Possible voluntary job share for a dynamic duo! 

Possible livery for own horse during post. 

Please contact Katie or Stuart via hillcescentfarm@hotmail.co.uk  

www.hillcrescentdayfarm.co.uk  


 

CJS Focus CJS Focus on Volunteering in association with TCV will be published on Monday.

view the most recent edition here or download a pdf copy.

The next edition will be published on Monday 19 November

And is looking at: Employabilty.

 

Check back on Monday to read the latest edition which will be included in full in next month's edition of CJS Professional.

 Enquire about CJS Focus  (or make suggestions for future editions) by contacting Amy here.


Advertise your voluntary roles with CJS - it's free! Click here.

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Surveys and Fieldwork: additions in August

Many conservation organisations appeal for volunteer surveyors to record and submit local sightings for a national wildlife survey.

Taking part in any of these surveys will give you useful experience and also help to extend the scientific knowledge of a species, so vital for appropriate conservation management. Some include training in survey techniques and some may even pay expenses. 

 

General

Biological Recording Groups carry out wildlife surveys, gather data on wildlife and ensure that the information is available to the public. To find out how you could get involved, find out how to contact your nearest Group at http://www.brisc.org.uk/Sources.php

 

The Biological Records Centre (BRC) is a national focus in the UK for terrestrial and freshwater species recording. BRC works closely with the voluntary recording community, principally through support of national recording schemes and societies. Find out more on http://www.brc.ac.uk/

 

Birds

Tawny Owl Point Survey National Tawny Owl Survey requiring volunteers to select 'tetrads' to visit for evening visits between mid-August and mid-October 2018 (initially) tops@bto.org https://c-js.co.uk/2vw1ojR

 

Invertebrates

The Big Wasp Survey needs people to set up wasp traps for a week in late August/early September. Simple and fun to make, the contents will be sent to scientists free of charge to help monitor and evaluate wasp populations across the UK. Full instructions, details of how to register and the results of last year's study are online Sign up today! www.bigwaspsurvey.org  

 

Butterfly Conservation has raised awareness of the drastic decline in butterflies and moths, and created widespread acceptance that action needs to be taken. Through our conservation work, we have also begun to reverse the decline of several of our most threatened species. See how you can get involved at https://butterfly-conservation.org/  

 

Heather Beetle is a widespread and common insect species found across Britain. The larvae (and to a lesser extent the adult beetles) feed on the leaves of heather plants, stripping them bare and damaging the health of the heather. Tell us about beetle damage at http://www.heathertrust.co.uk/heather-beetle  

 

If you are interested in helping with any of the surveys please contact the person or see the website listed.

Please see the full listings online at: http://www.countryside-jobs.com/workdays/surveys

 


CJS Announcements and articles of interest.

 

Featured Charity

We'll be introducing our next charity later this year, if your organisation would like to be our featured charity please contact us to find out what's involved and what CJS can offer you. Readers you may nominate your chosen charity as well, we do have a short list in mind but are always open to suggestions. Email suggestions and requests to Kerryn on Kerryn@countryside-jobs.com

 

Website upgrade

Having (almost) finished the CV listing site countryside-careers.com we're in the process of drawing up a brief for our web designer to overhaul the CJS site (clean pages, more pictures, simplified navigation, drop unused pages etc…..) and we'd like your suggestions. We've quite a few from last year's survey but we're always open to ideas.  So if there's something that really bugs you or maybe there's something you really like please let us know and we'll add your thoughts to ours.  We've got a few new features up our sleeves too but again suggestions please.  Email us your ideas and feedback.

Our web designer has decided that instead of the facelift we were planning he thinks we should upgrade EVERYTHING! so it will take a bit longer than we initially planned for but it does mean that, within reason, anything is possible - so let your imagination run riot!

 


News.

We collate together news from across the internet; sent out in real time via twitter and each day we pick a handful of stories of interest which are included on the Headlines page, the daily email update and here grouped according to subject.

 

Click on the headline to read more.

 

Hey, look it's lots of little CJs!

10,000 snails - BIAZA.

250 years after Captain James Cook's expedition sailed to the ‘South Seas’ and collected the first Partula snail, the 10,000th snail has made the trip back.

(Image: Sian Addison)In a collaborative effort BIAZA zoos including ZSL London Zoo, Bristol Zoo, Chester Zoo, Marwell Wildlife and RZSS Edinburgh Zoo, and other collections from around the world, have bred more than 10,000 Polynesian tree snails for one of the world’s largest reintroduction initiatives.

(Image: Sian Addison)

Jo Elliott, Animal Collection Manager at RZSS Edinburgh Zoo, said: “We are proud to breed Partulasnails and help restore them back into their native habitat.  This is a wonderful conservation success story and really helps to highlight the important role that zoos play in protecting species against extinction. The results we are seeing are made possible through the efforts of committed zoos working together as part of an international breeding programme, which bodes well for both Polynesian tree snails and wildlife conservation in general”.

After nearly being wiped out in the 1980s by the introduced predatory rosy wolf snail (Euglandina rosea) these fingernail-sized snails are now on their way back from the brink of extinction thanks to the global breeding programme coordinated by ZSL (Zoological Society of London). With reintroductions taking place on the islands of Moorea and Tahiti in the Society Islands, this year’s export, for the first time ever, will also include a species that is currently Extinct in the Wild.

ZSL’s Curator of Invertebrates, Paul Pearce-Kelly said: “This year we’ll be sending out a species of Partula, the Navenave snail (Partula mirabilis) that’s new to the reintroduction initiative and for which we have strong hopes for. I believe through the collaborative efforts of the international zoo community and French Polynesian Government environmental agencies; this major conservation initiative has an excellent chance of saving these fascinating species”.

CJ the Snail was the first charity endeavour supported by CJS and you our readers - find out more about this little snail and how we helped him on his first conservation journey. 

And don't forget: we're accepting nominations to be our next featured charity, email Kerryn.

 

Education, Recreation and Health.

Land Trust launches new education strategy to inspire young people to get outdoors - The Land Trust 

The Land Trust is delighted to launch a new education strategy, as the green space management charity looks to inspire people of all ages to spend more time outside and enjoy all the benefits that spending time in well managed green space has to offer.

Working in partnerships with local schools and nurseries and providing volunteering opportunities, through projects such as our Green Angels programme, the Land Trust is aiming to increase the amount of time spent by young people outdoors, and give them the opportunity to learn new skills, enhance their future prospects and make a difference in their community.

Tree planting at Countess of Chester country park in 2017 (image: The Land Trust)Tree planting at Countess of Chester country park in 2017 (image: The Land Trust)

The time currently spent outdoors by children is worrying low and it was these statistics, combined with a crisis in childhood obesity and mental health, that encouraged the  Land Trust to act, with director of portfolio management, Alan Carter, explaining: “The Land Trust has been delivering educational activities on our sites since its inception but this strategy is about developing that offer further and making a real difference in the communities who live and work close to our sites.  The UK Government wishes to use and develop the natural environment to improve the education and lives of all children, with a particular focus on those from deprived communities. This desire is set against a backdrop of rising childhood obesity levels, decreasing childhood mental health and decreasing levels of interaction of children and young people in the natural environment. In fact it is reported that three quarters of UK children spend less time outside than prison inmates, while a fifth of children do not play outside at all on an average day. These findings are completely unacceptable and if they are allowed to remain unchanged we risk generations of people missing out on enjoying time outside and the physical and mental benefits that brings. With over 60 sites across the country we recognise that we are in a unique position to make a real difference and our refreshed education strategy is the first step in that process.”

Over the next three years the Land Trust will have a strategic focus on developing relationships with schools and nurseries within walking distance of our spaces.  The charity is investing in six new outdoor learning areas across their sites at Wellesley Woodlands, Bewsey, Kiverton, Old Hall, Silverdale and Hassall Green, while also training rangers and teachers as forest school practitioners, to enhance the variety of activity on our sites. The Land Trust is also working with an external body, Nature-Nurture, to produce an education pack for use by local schools near our site at Davey Down. This will then be developed to provide some more generic learning packs to be made available to schools across the country.  

 

Garden of Tranquillity: a sanctuary for people living with dementia - Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

A safe, tranquil and sensory space designed specifically as a respite for people living with dementia and their carers will shortly take shape within the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh (RBGE). With natural boundaries for privacy, fragrant plants, comfortable seating, a water rill and art, this social inclusion project is quickly mustering support from visitors.

Conceived by Judy Good, while studying for her  RBGE Diploma in Garden Design, the idea started as a piece of coursework with very personal resonance, as she explained: “I was inspired by my good friend, Gillian Lindsay, whose mum had early onset dementia and is now, sadly, in the very late stages of the disease. Gillian was always looking for places to take her mum, where they could get out of the house and spend time together, but where her mum felt safe and relaxed. It can be difficult.  There are not many places in Edinburgh and the surrounding area where this need can be met.”

Her remarks were backed by Gillian: "In the eight years that we’ve lived with my mum’s dementia, we’ve come to realise that, for her, we can’t prevent the disease getting worse.  Our sole purpose when we’re with her is to try to help her have a sense of contentment in the present. With her fading memory and understanding of the world, life can feel very stressful and complicated for her. To help with this, we talk to her about the immediate things around us. Our one-way conversations are made easier by being in a place where there is a feeling of beauty and calm, as well as a variety of sights and scents and sounds to prompt our observations.   A garden created with this in mind would be an ideal place for us to spend time together, to reminisce on her behalf and to be peaceful and happy in the moment. Such a huge part of the Botantics’ own history is about being therapeutic and restorative and I see immense value in having a garden there which brings an element of this to people living with dementia now."  

 

“Missed opportunity” for Welsh Government to improve public access – Cycling UK

As cyclists celebrate 50 years today (03 August) of being legally allowed to ride on bridleways in the UK, Cycling UK is urging the Welsh Government not to lose momentum in its proposals to improve public access.

  • Charity says Welsh Government is ignoring huge swell of public support for change
  • Cycling UK urges Government to build on legacy of Geraint Thomas
  • UK celebrates 50 years of legal cycling on bridleways today

Enjoying an early morning on one of the bridleways on Snowdon. Photo: Tom HuttonEnjoying an early morning on one of the bridleways on Snowdon. Photo: Tom Hutton

The right for people to cycle on bridleways was granted by the Countryside Act 1968 when the law commenced on 03 August 1968. These changes were due to campaigning by the Cyclists’ Touring Club, now Cycling UK, and this right to ride has allowed generations all to enjoy the wonders of the UK’s countryside from the saddle. 

This move fifty years ago helped grant cyclists in England and Wales access to just over 20% of all rights of way. However, since 1968 there has been little change, meaning people riding bikes and/or horses are not allowed on 80 per cent of the rights of way network. 

The UK’s rights of way network frequently interchanges between footpaths and bridleways, with often no noticeable change in quality between the two apart from a different signpost. This has clearly created confusion among the nation’s cyclists, as Cycling UK’s report “Rides of Way” discovered 74 per cent of people cycling on the UK’s rights of way network found it “unsuitable”. 

Duncan Dollimore, Cycling UK’s head of campaigns said: “While Cycling UK today celebrates our victory 50 years ago of being able to ride on traffic free routes in our countryside, we’re also looking to the future and what else can be improved. There’s a huge sway of public support for change to rights of way in Wales, and it’s a missed opportunity if they continue to sit on the fence on this important issue.”

 

Animal and wildlife news.

University and Chester Zoo join forces to fight global extinction of threatened species - University of Manchester

The University of Manchester has teamed up with the UK’s number one zoo to help prevent the extinction of threatened species across the planet.

The new partnership will deliver high-impact scientific research to ensure effective population management of some of the world’s most endangered animals. The collaboration will see more than £1.1 million invested across two major research areas. The first focuses on improving the future outlook for some of Africa’s most endangered and emblematic mega herbivore species - such as highly threatened Eastern black rhinos and Grevy’s zebra.

More than 60% of mega-herbivores are facing extinction as a result of range collapse, degradation of habitat and persecution. The highest diversity of mega-herbivore is found in African savannahs, making them a crucial ecosystem to study.

Rhino and zebra populations have both become highly fragmented over the past decades and are under pressure from hunting and livestock competition. A joint research initiative will investigate how health varies across wild populations of these species– in order to reveal how they are affected by environmental change and human disturbance.

 

Drones and wildlife: Operators warned against misuse - Issued by SNH on behalf of the Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime (PAW) Scotland

 Specialists have warned that those operating drones could be causing stress to wildlife.

Drones have become increasingly popular for taking aerial photographs and for conservation work, such as scientific surveys. But your drone could put you on the wrong side of the law, if you fly it too close to wildlife. The Partnership for Action Against Wildlife Crime (PAW) Scotland says there are some important do’s and don’ts to avoid disturbing protected species.

The law protects the nests of wild birds from any form of damage or obstruction, including even our most common garden birds. Some birds, like the golden eagle and mammals, like dolphins and whales, are protected from disturbance at any time, not just within the breeding season.

Andy Turner, Wildlife Crime Officer with SNH, says, “There have been several incidents involving drones disturbing seals at designated haul-out sites. Likewise. there have been anecdotal reports of drones being used to film sea bird colonies and raptors. While the footage from drones in these circumstances can be very spectacular, the operator must be mindful of the effect on wildlife. Birds of prey in particular can see drones as a threat and act aggressively towards them, causing both injury to themselves and damage to the drone.  We would encourage anyone wishing to film wildlife with a drone to contact SNH for advice and, if necessary, apply for a licence.”

Detailed guidance on wildlife photography and licensing can be found on the PAW Scotland website here.

 

Invertebrates

Southern migrant hawker dragonflies recorded for the first time in Dorset - Dorset Wildlife Trust

The first Southern migrant hawker dragonflies ever recorded in Dorset have been seen on Dorset Wildlife Trust’s (DWT’s) nature reserve, Lytchett Heath, which is part of The Great Heath Living Landscape project in east Dorset.

Three males have been seen in the area, where they were first discovered by local birdwatcher, Ian Ballam.

Southern migrant hawker dragonfly (photo: Ian Ballam via Dorset Wildlife Trust)Southern migrant hawker dragonfly (photo: Ian Ballam via Dorset Wildlife Trust)

Ian said, “Lytchett Bay is my ‘patch’ for birding, but in summer I also record dragonflies.  I was making a quick visit to the DWT reserve at Lytchett Bay on Saturday 21st July and as soon as I arrived at the main "dried-up" pool I noticed a bright blue small Hawker type dragonfly.  Then I noticed another exactly the same on an adjacent pool.  They were extremely aggressive to eachother which pointed towards the behaviour of the southern migrant hawker.  In the end, I spotted three.  I was elated to have found them and even more happy that I manged to identify this tricky species from just flight observations, and after about 90 minutes one came to rest on some reeds so I could confirm my ID was correct.”

If you see a southern migrant hawker in Dorset, please let Dorset Wildlife Trust know. You can tweet us @DorsetWildlife, post on our facebook page (facebook/dorsetwildlife) or email on enquiries@dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk.

If you see something unusual check our Surveys section to see who might want to know about your sighting.

 

Housebuilder supports bumblebees of Ashbourne – Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Image: Bumblebee Conservation TrustAn East Midlands housebuilder has partnered with the Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT) to support the conservation of bumblebees in Ashbourne.

Redrow Homes East Midlands’ Henmore Gardens, which is situated on Wyaston Road, has joined the plight of the bumblebee by introducing pollinator-friendly habitats across its grounds.

The development is one of Redrow’s pollinator flagship projects, created with the intention of helping to boost the number of bumblebees, as well as other wildlife, across the UK.

Image: Bumblebee Conservation Trust

Building awareness with new residents, Redrow Homes East Midlands is also offering all completions at the development membership to the BBCT. Each membership includes factsheets, bee-friendly wildflower seeds, a car window sticker, postcards and a fold-out bumblebee identification guide.

As well as a wildflower meadow area, the housebuilder is working in partnership with the Trust to ensure the wider planting plans meet the needs of the bumblebee. This will include plants that are rich in nectar, as well as those with flowering times which range across the year to ensure a good supply of nectar from early summer, when the bees emerge, throughout the year.

Residents will be encouraged to create a haven for bumblebees in their own gardens, introducing flowers rich in pollen and nectar, such as sedum, lavender, alliums, herbs and wild roses.

 

Native crayfish make a comeback in Lincolnshire - Environment Agency

(image: Environment Agency)The first transfer in the county of white-clawed crayfish has been hailed a success as the protected species is now breeding in its new location.

(image: Environment Agency)

A threatened species of crayfish is making a comeback in Lincolnshire thanks to efforts by the Environment Agency and local conservation groups.

Last July, 600 white-clawed crayfish were moved from locations in the River Witham – where they’re at risk of being wiped out by invasive signal crayfish – to new remote locations including a chalk stream in the Lincolnshire Wolds.

Now, surveys show the transfer – the first in the county – has been successful, and the crayfish have started to breed.

Native white-clawed crayfish have been in decline since non-native American signal crayfish escaped into UK waters in the 1970s. These larger, invasive crayfish outcompete native species for food and habitat and carry a disease fatal to the UK species.

But working with partners such as the Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project (LCSP) and the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, the Environment Agency is seeking to secure their future by relocating them to areas free of the invaders in a scheme known as the ‘ark project.’

Richard Chadd, senior environmental monitoring officer with the Environment Agency said: These crayfish are a vital part of our ecology, so preserving them is yet another example of how we’re protecting our environment for the future”.

  

Wasp new to UK found on nature reserve - Worcestershire Wildlife Trust

A wasp that has never been recorded in Britain before has been found on a new nature reserve in Worcestershire’s Wyre Forest.

The parasitoid wasp Diphyus latebricola was discovered by a member of the Wyre Forest Study Group at the Helen Mackaness nature reserve. The group had been contracted to survey the site by its owner Worcestershire Wildlife Trust as a first step in managing the new reserve.

Andy Harris, conservation officer responsible for the nature reserve, explained “This is a fantastic find on one of our newest nature reserves. It’s only a small grassland that includes wet flushes and dry meadow with a stand of mature oak trees and an old orchard so to have found something this rare is a really pleasant surprise.”

 

Rare jumping spider discovered in UK for the first time ever in Warrington - Cheshire Wildlife Trust

An exciting discovery has been made this summer at Cheshire Wildlife Trust’s Holcroft Moss Nature Reserve, in Warrington. Arachnologist, Richard Burkmar, discovered a special tiny jumping spider, just half the size of a matchstick head, during a survey visit to the Cheshire bog in June. His discovery turned out to be a rare Sibianor larae – a species never recognised before in the UK. The sighting was confirmed following an invitation for fellow arachnologist, Richard Gallon, to accompany him on a return visit to the site where they were able to find more examples of the rare spider. After studying the spider under a microscope, they both agreed it fitted the description of the continental species Sibianor larae.

Their next step was a visit to Manchester Museum to see world jumping spider expert, Dmitri Logunov, Curator of Arthropods at the museum, who confirmed that it was a Sibianor larae and was the first recognised sighting in Britain. He had originally described the species when it was new to science in 2001, naming it after his wife Larisa Logunov (Lara is an abbreviated form for Larisa).

Cheshire Wildlife Trust has carried out lowland raised bog restoration work at the site and is continuing to improve its condition. “We were delighted to hear about all the special discoveries that have been made at our Holcroft Moss Nature Reserve,” said Sarah Bennett, Area Manager West, part of the conservation team at Cheshire Wildlife Trust. “The site is particularly special as it has never been exploited and cut for peat; something which is unusual for most peatland in the UK. A number of other rare bog spiders were also discovered during the surveys, including the jumping spider Heliophanus dampfi, making it the only site in England where this has been recorded. It is definitely a special site for bog loving wildlife.”

 

Native crayfish make a comeback in Lincolnshire – Lincolnshire Wolds AONB

The first transfer in the county of white-clawed crayfish has been hailed a success as the protected species is now breeding in its new location. 
A threatened species of crayfish is making a comeback in Lincolnshire thanks to efforts by the Environment Agency and local conservation groups.
Last July, 600 white-clawed crayfish were moved from locations in the River Witham – where they're at risk of being wiped out by invasive signal crayfish – to new remote locations including a chalk stream in the Lincolnshire Wolds.
Now, surveys show the transfer – the first in the county – has been successful, and the crayfish have started to breed.

Native white-clawed crayfish have been in decline since non-native American signal crayfish escaped into UK waters in the 1970s. These larger, invasive crayfish outcompete native species for food and habitat and carry a disease fatal to the UK species.
But working with partners such as the Lincolnshire Chalk Streams Project (LCSP) and the Lincolnshire Wildlife Trust, the Environment Agency is seeking to secure their future by relocating them to areas free of the invaders in a scheme known as the ‘ark project.'

Richard Chadd, senior environmental monitoring officer with the Environment Agency said: "These crayfish are a vital part of our ecology, so preserving them is yet another example of how we're protecting our environment for the future. Having personally worked on this project – physically picking up these crayfish, measuring them, checking their health and relocating them to their new homes – I'm thrilled that our efforts at protecting them have been so successful. Previously the crayfish were only present in two locations in the county, so we've potentially doubled their habitat in the space of a year – and Lincolnshire's rare, protected chalk streams are the perfect home. They're remote, clean, and the water is high in calcium, which helps crayfish form strong exoskeletons and makes them more robust."

 

Helping the pearl mussel to survive through sustainable forest management - Forestry Commission Scotland

(Photo credit Ian Mckee)Fresh water pearl mussels aren’t something you’d normally think about when you enter a forest. But most of the world’s remaining populations of fresh water pearl mussels live in rivers and streams in partially or wholly forested catchments. This means sustainable forest management has a pivotal role to play in conserving this globally threatened population.

(Photo credit Ian Mckee)

The FES North Highland Forest District has the largest concentration of extant pearl mussel rivers in both Scotland and the UK, and the Environment Team has led efforts to conserve pearl mussel populations.

Work has been developed and implemented to aid the protection and recovery of this species. This started with a series of targeted surveys to find out where the pearl mussels were living and numbers. The results then helped inform forest management plans, including how to harvest a 30ha site of trees which blocked light from the water and provided large quantities of needles and cone litter directly into the water, which in turn blocked water space and nutrients available. 20 dams were carefully installed across the forest ditches and once harvesting began, surveyors monitored the effects and where necessary, installed additional dams.

  

Asian hornet identified in Cornwall - Defra

An Asian hornet has been found in Cornwall and surveillance activity is underway.

Asian hornet (Defra)The National Bee Unit has confirmed a sighting of the Asian hornet in the Fowey area of south Cornwall.

Asian hornet (Defra)

This Asian hornet is smaller than our native hornet and poses no greater risk to human health than a bee. However, they do pose a risk to honey bees and work is already underway to identify any nests, which includes deploying bee inspectors to visit local beekeepers and setting up monitoring traps.

Previous outbreaks of the Asian hornet have been successfully contained by APHA bee inspectors who promptly tracked down and destroyed the nests. The intention is to do the same in this instance.

Nicola Spence, Defra Deputy Director for Plant and Bee Health, said: "While the Asian Hornet poses no greater risk to human health than a bee, we recognise the damage they can cause to honey bee colonies. That’s why we are taking swift and robust action to locate and investigate any nests in the south Cornwall areas following this confirmed sighting. Following the successful containment of the Asian hornet incursion in North Devon last year and Tetbury previously, we have a well-established protocol in place to eradicate them and control any potential spread."

 

Birds

Record number of hen harrier chicks tagged this year - RSPB 

Over 30 chicks tagged by RSPB project  

An unprecedented number of hen harrier chicks have been fitted with satellite tags this year by the RSPB as part of its EU funded Hen Harrier LIFE project to secure the future of these threatened birds. 

Hen Harrier 'Eric' tagged in 2017 (image: RSPB)Hen Harrier 'Eric' tagged in 2017 (image: RSPB)

So far more than 30 of the young birds have been tagged, the majority of them in Scotland. This is the fourth year in a row that the project has fitted satellite tags on hen harrier chicks. A number of those tagged this year are the offspring of birds tagged in previous years by the project including DeeCee who hatched in Perthshire in 2016.

Hen harriers are one of the UK’s rarest birds and the satellite tags allow the project to follow their movements as they leave the nest, gaining invaluable information on where the birds spend their time. The odds are stacked against hen harrier chicks from the start with survival rates of around 22 per cent in their first two years of life. The tags can reveal information about the cause of death for many of these young birds.

Of the birds tagged in 2017 almost 40 per cent are known to have died from natural causes, in line with these low survival rates. As the tags continue to transmit after a bird has died the remains of many of them were able to be recovered allowing post mortems to be carried out. These showed some to have been predated, while others died of starvation. One bird, Eric who was tagged in Orkney in July 2017, apparently drowned in January.   However, the tags also reveal that over a quarter of last year’s chicks have disappeared in suspicious circumstances. In these cases, transmissions from tags that have been functioning perfectly suddenly stop. 

The project is grateful for the fantastic support given from members of the Scottish Raptor Study Group and to the many landowners and their staff for their interest and help in assisting to tag so many birds.

From September a selection of this year’s tagged birds will be added to the project website where their travels can be followed along with some of the surviving birds from previous years: www.rspb.org.uk/henharrierlife

 

Breeding Roseates re-tern to Wales - RSPB

For the first time in more than a decade, a pair of roseate terns – the UK’s rarest breeding seabird – have fledged one chick from The Skerries, off Anglesey.

Thanks to additional funding from the EU-funded Roseate Tern LIFE Recovery Project, we’re pleased to announce two roseate tern chicks were born at The Skerries this past summer – with one chick having successfully flown the nest for the first time since 2006. 

The funding provided a two-week extension on the islands’ wardening season, along with newly designed nest boxes being placed strategically around the islands. The wardens also placed lures playing roseate tern calls and hand-made decoys with the aim of attracting passing roseate terns to the colony.

Once widespread across Wales, roseate terns nearly became extinct in the 19th century because their plumage was prized for fashionable hats. Sadly, roseate terns continue to face many challenges, including food shortages, eroding nesting habitat and predation. To address this challenge, 2015 saw the launch of an ambitious five year EU-funded Roseate Tern LIFE Recovery Project bringing together conservationists from the RSPB, BirdWatch Ireland and North Wales Wildlife Trust on the three breeding colonies (two in Ireland and one in the UK). The project is also focused on creating further roseate tern-friendly sites across the UK and Ireland in the hopes of re-establishing thriving colonies.

Currently in 2018, there are only 116 breeding pairs of Roseate terns in the UK, restricted to just Coquet Island in England. With their incredibly pale plumage with slight rosy flush and long tail streamers, they are considered the most elegant of the five breeding terns to visit our shores. These endangered birds migrate each spring from western Africa to breed at only a handful of colonies in the UK and Ireland

 

Rare nocturnal birds breeding at RSPB HQ for first time in 45 years - RSPB

Nightjars have returned to breed at The Lodge nature reserve, home to the RSPB’s UK headquarters, for the first time since 1973

The RSPB has announced that nightjars are breeding at The Lodge nature reserve, home of the charity’s UK headquarters for the first time since 1973, 45 years ago.

A single pair of the nocturnal birds has nested and raised chicks on an area of restored heathland on the reserve. Local birdwatcher Neil Bostock was the first to discover the birds on 3 June, when, on a regular walk of the site, he heard the “churring” call of a male nightjar. Later, the male and female birds were seen engaging in mating displays, signally their intent to breed. 

Nightjars nest on the ground, using their cryptic camouflage to stay hidden during the day, and only come out after dark to feed on moths and other flying insects, making them notoriously elusive and difficult to see. This means that while all the signs point to their having a nest and chicks, confirmation that they have successfully reared young, and how many, will have to wait until after they have finished nesting. This has not dampened the mood of team at The Lodge nature reserve though. 

Peter Bradley, Senior Site Manager at The Lodge nature reserve said: “We’re over the moon, not only because these amazing birds have returned to the reserve and appear to be breeding here for the first time in so many years, but that they have chosen to nest on a part of the reserve where we expressly set about recreating the kind of heathland habitat used by nesting nightjars that has historically been lost for this and many other parts of the country. It is a great success story for The Lodge and for everyone who has been involved in the heathland re-creation work here over the last 15 years.”

 

Heatwave makes flamingos broody for first time in 15 years - WWT

(image: WWT)The rare flock of Andean flamingos at WWT Slimbridge have become foster parents to chicks from their near-relatives, Chilean flamingos, after the hot spell triggered them to lay their first eggs since 2003.

(image: WWT)

The record-breaking temperatures sparked six of the exotic birds to lay nine eggs, but as they were all infertile, the expectant mums and dads were left without chicks to rear. So to fulfil their needs as expectant parents, experts at the Gloucestershire reserve decided to give them Chilean flamingo eggs to hatch and look after as their own.

Aviculture Manager at Slimbridge Mark Roberts said: “It’s a wonderful and welcome surprise that the Andeans have started laying again after nearly two decades. We’ve been encouraging the flock by helping them to build nests but there’s no doubt that the recent heat has had the desired effect. Unfortunately none of the eggs were viable so with the Andeans in full parenting mode we gave them Chilean chicks to bring up as their own. It’s great motivation and enriching for the birds.”

 

Seeds of success as agri-environment scheme benefits bird species on NI farms – RSPB

Yellowhammer photo (C) Alan BatesThree key farmland bird species increased in number over a five-year period in response to an agri-environment scheme (AES), according to a study by the RSPB.

Yellowhammer photo (C) Alan Bates
Yellowhammers, house sparrows and tree sparrows rose in abundance in farms taking part in the project across east County Down. Yellowhammers – a red-listed species (a bird of high conservation concern) which had been in sharp decline – were up by an impressive 78% between 2006 and 2011. Yet yellowhammer numbers continue to decline in the wider countryside where measures are not in place.
With the opening this week of the Environmental Farming Scheme (EFS), RSPB NI is encouraging farmers to sign up for this scheme that compensates landowners for undertaking work to enhance biodiversity and water quality.
EFS, administered by the Department of Agriculture, the Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA), is open to all active farmers who have management control of at least three hectares of eligible farmland. Key options in EFS highlighted by RSPB NI are provision of winter feed crop for wild birds, retention of winter stubble, creation of arable margins and creation of pollinator margins.
The RSPB farmland bird study, the first of its kind to be carried out on the island of Ireland, included face-to-face advisory work and showed that AES land management can improve the population status of farmland bird species. As well as the surge in yellowhammer numbers on farms taking part in the AES, house sparrows were up 46% and tree sparrows up 207% in the five-year period.
Kendrew Colhoun, RSPB Senior Conservation Scientist, said: “Our study was designed to evaluate whether the last AES options led to increases in the priority species the options were targeted at - and our conclusion was a resounding ‘yes’.”

 

Record-breaking year for UK’s rarest seabird - RSPB

The UK’s rarest breeding seabird, the roseate tern, has enjoyed its most successful nesting season in the last 40 years on RSPB Coquet Island with 118 pairs raising chicks at the Northumberland site.

This beats the previous joint record of 111 pairs in 2015 and 2017 and tells the story of saving the species from a brink of extinction. 

Roseate terns were once widespread with breeding colonies in each of the four UK countries. However, their population crashed a staggering 80% in the 1970s, when only 16 pairs were left on Coquet Island. Currently, this small island, off the Northumberland coast, is their only regular UK breeding colony.

This breeding success at RSPB Coquet Island is owed to a programme of ongoing conservation work over the past 18 years on the island, aimed at reversing the fortunes of the threatened seabird. 

Roseate terns (affectionately known as rosys) have elegant tail streamers and handsome, light, rose-coloured breast feathers. 

Unlike other tern species, which nest in the open, roseate terns prefer to nest in crevices and small holes. For this reason, the RSPB introduced nest boxes on specially created shingle terraces in 2000 when the breeding population was only 34 pairs. This improved the birds’ chances of nesting and raising chicks by providing shelter against predators and bad weather. 

The conservation efforts have been given a boost over the past three years through the EU-funded Roseate Tern LIFE Recovery Project. This initiative has provided over 200 new nest boxes, as well as a special hide, which enables wardens on the island to protect and monitor the nests.

 

Nuthatches arrive at Loch of the Lowes - Scottish Wildlife Trust

A small woodland bird which is spreading northwards through the UK has been recorded at Loch of the Lowes Wildlife Reserve near Dunkeld for the first time.

Nuthatch at Loch of the Lowes (photo: Marion Moore via Scottish Wildlife Trust)Nuthatch at Loch of the Lowes (photo: Marion Moore via Scottish Wildlife Trust)

Nuthatches were first recorded in Scotland in 1989 and they are gradually increasing their range northwards. This spring a nesting pair was recorded in Inverness-shire. Their spread is believed to be a result of climate change.

Paul Anderson, Assistant Ranger at Loch of the Lowes said: “We regularly see climbing birds including tree creepers and greater spotted woodpeckers at the reserve but these colourful new arrivals have been causing quite a stir at our viewing window. The nuthatch has been increasing its range north for decades. We were aware that they had been seen relatively close by at Killiekrankie in recent years so it was really just a matter of time until we started to see them at Loch of the Lowes and it is a delight to have our first pair. However, while it’s great to have another colourful and interesting bird to show visitors we are conscious that their presence here is likely down to climate change, something which could have other less welcome effects on our native wildlife as temperatures increase.”  

 

Bewick’s cygnet numbers in Arctic early sign of bumper breeding season - Wildfowl and Wetlands Trust

Bewick Swan (image: WWT)Our experts made the exciting discovery during their annual 2000-mile trip to the Arctic to ring the critically endangered birds.

After spotting just one cygnet last year, Conservation Scientist Kane Brides and Reserve Warden David Dinsley sighted 24 cygnets and ten families during the successful expedition.

(image: WWT)

The young birds were well-sized and expected to fledge, hopefully adding to the numbers that will visit us over the winter.

Kane said: “This is a definite indication of a better breeding season than last year when spring was late and the birds didn’t have as much of a window to breed. Thankfully the weather was OK this year, allowing the swans to get on.  In the next four weeks the Bewick’s will begin leaving the Arctic to begin their epic journey through Europe. We hope this snapshot means there will be more cygnets in tow with their families.”

The team managed to tag 74 birds including 60 Bewick’s swans, ten of which had been ringed before. Amazingly, two of the swans were known to visit Welney on the Ouse Washes. Nine mutes were also ringed as well as five whoopers.

The team will then carry out three assessments over winter in the UK and collate the details to establish how successful the breeding season was. The yearly Arctic trips give our conservationists an early idea of how it’s gone.

Mammals

New ‘suspension bridge’ keeps red squirrels safe in Highlands - Trees for Life

Photobombing red squirrel on Shieldaig road bridge (image: Trees for Life)A specially designed rope bridge slung between trees high over a Highlands road is giving red squirrels a safe crossing. Camera footage has revealed regular use of the bridge by the charismatic species. Conservation charity Trees for Life installed the bridge over a road near Shieldaig last summer, as part of its project to reintroduce red squirrels to the northwest Highlands.

Photobombing red squirrel on Shieldaig road bridge (image: Trees for Life)

Footage collected for more than a year from a camera trap has now revealed squirrels from a flourishing new population at Shieldaig crossing the bridge and exploring their new homes. Together with nearby road signs alerting drivers to the squirrels’ presence, the innovative bridge appears to have had a significant impact in reducing road deaths of the species. “Sadly, road traffic is a major risk for wildlife – including red squirrels. We wanted to take positive action to help the red squirrel population spread into the local woodlands as safely as possible. The combination of bridge and road signs definitely appears to be working well, which is great news,” said Becky Priestley, Trees for Life’s Wildlife Officer. “It’s safer for reds to travel in the tree canopy rather than on the ground, so it’s likely that if they have the option of using a bridge rather than crossing the road, they will take it. We also installed feeders at each end of the bridge to encourage the squirrels to use it.”

Since the bridge and road signs were introduced, there has only been one known red squirrel road death locally, with none reported so far in 2018. In the year prior to the safety measures, there were three reported road deaths of reds in the immediate area, and two others further away on another road.

 

Pine marten returning to Kielder Water & Forest Park - Forestry Commission

Camera footage has confirmed pine marten in Kielder Water & Forest Park for the first time since planting in 1926. This is great news for the partnership of organisations working together for pine marten conservation in northern England, including Forestry Commission England, Northumberland Wildlife Trust, Aberdeen University and Vincent Wildlife Trust.

The cameras are in a remote area of Kielder Water & Forest Park as part of a red squirrel monitoring project and while many other species are frequently captured this is the first time pine marten have been spotted. The images were first seen by John Hartshorne, who manages the fieldwork and ecology education organisation Albion Outdoors and has been helping with the squirrel surveys as part of the Red Squirrels United project for several years now.

John says: ”It is very common to see wildlife other than squirrels on the cameras I use. Badgers, foxes, deer and birds of all sorts are regular visitors. This July I have caught some excellent pictures of red squirrels but also an unexpected visitor – a pine marten, sitting on top of one of the squirrel feeders. This was most unexpected but I now have both still pictures and a short piece of video firmly placing pine marten in Kielder Water & Forest Park. Historically, pine martens were commonplace but habitat clearance and persecution has led to them being eliminated from nearly all of England".

Pine martens are elusive members of the weasel family and their biggest UK stronghold is in Scotland.

Read about Pine Marten and how volunteers helped with their re-introduction in Wales in this article by our Featured Charity, The Vincent Wildlife Trust

 

Home to roost: largest hibernation of pipistrelle bats recorded at Seaton Delaval Hall - Bat Conservation Trust

The largest common pipistrelle bat winter roost in the UK has been found at Seaton Delaval Hall in Northumberland, revealing previously unknown information about the bats’ hibernation habits.

Sixty-one pipistrelle bats were recorded in stone crevices and in the arches of a balcony at the hall earlier this year.

Common Pipistrelle bat (image: Chris Damant / National Trust Images via BCT)Common Pipistrelle bat (image: Chris Damant / National Trust Images via BCT)

Significantly, the discovery also turns on its head ecologists’ long held belief that the pipistrelle prefers to hibernate in very dark, damp conditions, with these bats found hanging out in a dry, arid, relatively well-lit area of this grand 18th Century building.

The discovery comes following a £3.7million award from the National Lottery to repair and conserve the 18th-century Hall. The National Trust commissioned an ecological survey ahead of the work starting in November.

Tina Wiffen, bat ecologist said: “We discovered the bats when we were undertaking an ecological survey to assess the possibility of introducing new art and visitor information installations into the Central Hall of the building – a project being supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund. On finding the bats, we conducted a formal survey and at least 61 bats were counted in early March – with more visits then needed for verification. It’s likely that even more bats are here, hidden in deeper crevices. As a result the site will now be even more closely managed and monitored to ensure that the bats can continue to use the hall as their winter roost.”

Marine

An “unusually early” seal rescue from the RSPCA has marked the beginning of the season for the animal welfare charity in a busy part of Wales. - RSPCA

In 2017/18, RSPCA officers in the West and South West of Wales rescued in excess of 100 seals, and are bracing themselves for another potentially busy period.

Seal pup Aye-Aye (image: RSPCA)The first seal of the new season has now come into the charity’s care, after the moulted pup was taken in by Welsh Marine Life Rescue, having being found alone on Abereiddy beach last Monday (30 July).

Seal pup Aye-Aye (image: RSPCA)

In 2017/18, the first orphaned seal to arrive at the Taunton-based centre from Wales came on September 9.

Sadly, the poor pup was very nasally congested, and thin for her age. She has now been transferred to specialist wildlife facilities by the RSPCA, at Taunton.

Video footage shows the seal being transported to the specialist centre.

The seal has been affectionately named Aye-Aye, with the RSPCA’s West Hatch Centre this season naming rescued seals after rare species of wildlife. Aye-Aye will now undergo a period of rehabilitation for a planned return to the wild at a later date.

RSPCA animal collection officer (ACO) Ellie West reiterated the importance of people knowing what to do if they suspect a seal is in danger, adding: “It is the summer holidays – so we’re conscious that people may be coming across seals on beaches. Should somebody find a seal pup that looks fit and healthy and shows no signs of distress, they should monitor it first from a safe distance for 24 hours. If the mother does not return within 24 hours, or you think that the pup is sick or injured – please keep a safe distance and call our 24-hour emergency line on 0300 1234 999.”

RSPCA issue warning to ‘well-meaning’ public about returning beached dolphins to sea - RSPCA

The RSPCA has issued a warning about how to respond to finding unwell or beached cetaceans, after two dolphins were inappropriately returned to the sea by members of the public in West Wales in recent weeks.

Officers say “well-meaning” beach-walkers have sought to help beached dolphins by moving them back into the water, but that this is the “wrong thing to do for the animals, and their welfare”.

Last Sunday (5 August), a dead striped dolphin was found on Coppet Hall beach in the Saundersfoot area.  The RSPCA had previously responded to calls in the local area about the troubled striped dolphin – who had been beaching on a member of the public’s property. Unfortunately, in seeking to help the dolphin, members of the public refloated the unwell, thin and emaciated dolphin.  An RSPCA officer inspected photos of the dolphin and could “clearly see” that the dolphin was suffering and should not have been returned to the wild in this way.

In a separate incident, the RSPCA was alerted after a washed-up, skinny dolphin was found on a Newgale beach last Tuesday (7 August). The animal welfare charity arrived to find a dolphin in poor bodily condition, which had recently died. Unfortunately, well-meaning members of the public had tried on several occasions to return the dolphin to the water.

RSPCA Cymru say dolphins tend to beach for a reason – often because they have major welfare complications, or even because they are dying. A summer plea has been issued urging anyone who finds a beached cetaceans to contact the RSPCA immediately, and not seek to refloat the animal. Ellie West, RSPCA animal collection officer (ACO), said: “In many ways, it is a source of great pride that people across West Wales love wild animals and want to help.  But returning a beached cetacean to the sea can be hugely counter-productive. People are obviously well-meaning in doing this – but usually it is the wrong thing to do for the animals, and their welfare."

ACO West added: “If anyone sees a beached cetacean, they should ring the RSPCA’s emergency line on 0300 1234 999, and provide as much information as possible about the location of the animal, and their condition. We can then do whatever we can to help – or at least alleviate the animal’s suffering as quickly as possible.

 

Major boost for Trust’s marine work – Scottish Wildlife Trust

Launch event for the North Harris Snorkel Trail © Daryll BrownThe Scottish Wildlife Trust’s marine conservation work has received a major boost thanks to the Esmée Fairbairn Foundation. A £771,417 grant from the Foundation will allow the Trust to expand its Living Seas project over the next five years.

Launch event for the North Harris Snorkel Trail © Daryll Brown

This support will allow the Trust to continue and increase its advocacy for a healthier marine environment and establish a hub of excellence for marine community engagement in Ullapool – building on work in the North West Highlands started in 2015, which included the development of Scotland’s first-ever snorkel trail and an innovative remote litter station.

Living Seas Communities Manager Noel Hawkins said: “Initiatives like our North West Highlands Snorkel trail and the litter station at Dun Canna have generated interest from coastal communities all around Scotland’s coastline.

 

Funding and new partnerships.

£900k awarded to engage young people with heritage parks - Groundwork

Leading community, greenspace and youth charities, Groundwork, Fields in Trust and National Youth Agency, have today launched 'Future Proof Parks', a £900k National Lottery-funded programme that will engage friends of park groups with young people in an innovative bid to protect heritage parks.  

Future Proof Parks will engage 880 young people across the UK in the West Midlands, East of England, West of England, North West and North East, to learn more about their local historic park heritage, encourage young people to join their local friends of park groups and volunteer to preserve the local spaces that matter to the communities they live in.

The programme will work with 60 friends of park groups to give them informal youth work skills to engage and work with young people, in order to share ideas and combine the talents of established friends of park groups, with the passion and skills of young volunteers.

The three-year programme has been awarded funding through the Heritage Lottery Fund’s Kick the Dust programme, which aims to enable more young people to be involved in the UK’s heritage.

 

Threatened sand dunes given a new lease of LIFE – Natural England

Major sand dune conservation project awarded £4.3 million of funding

Sand dunes at Saltfleetby Lincolnshire (Natural England)Sand dunes at Saltfleetby Lincolnshire (Natural England)

Sand dunes across England are set for a golden future following £4.3 million worth of funding to help restore and protect these at risk habitats.

The funding - awarded to a partnership led by Natural England as part of the European Union’s LIFE programme - will help deliver a major conservation project to explore how to re-establish the natural movement within dunes and create the conditions that some of our rarest wildlife relies upon.

Healthy sand dunes with moving sand are a sanctuary for endangered plants and animals like the natterjack toad, dune gentian and sand lizard. However these habitats are currently being smothered and fixed by a tide of invasive non-native plants turning it into scrubland. Sand dunes are now one of the most at risk habitats in Europe. Only 20,000 hectares remain across England and Wales – an area around half the size of the Isle of Wight.

The DuneLIFE project will help Natural England improve the condition of key sand dune sites in Lincolnshire, Dorset, Cornwall, Devon, Merseyside and Cumbria by tackling the root causes of decline. The scheme will:

Deliver a programme of removal of invasive species to rebalance the natural processes of dune colonisation

Restore sand dunes and dune slacks

Create bare sand patches by turf stripping and sand scraping

Encourage more people to access and enjoy dunes and take part in their conservation

Natural England are working in partnership with Plantlife, National Trust and the Wildlife Trusts to deliver this ambitious and innovative project.

 

Land and Countryside Management.

 2018 Park Protector shortlist announced! - Campaign for National Parks

Campaign for National Parks has unveiled the shortlist for the 2018 Park Protector Award. Five projects ranging from teaching angling skills to young people in the North York Moors to restoring woodland in the New Forest represent the top nominees as selected by the judging panel.

The shortlisted projects are as follows:

  • Helping hands – Snowdonia National Park
  • Pondhead trust - New Forest National
  • Discovering the Esk - North York Moors National Park
  • Opening up Emsworthy Mire – Dartmoor National Park
  • White Peak woodlands - Peak District National Park

Andrew Hall of Campaign for National Parks said: “This tremendous shortlist reflects the incredible quality of applicants and the dedication of people across from across England and Wales to their National Parks. The Parks face many challenges, but each year the Park Protector Award reminds me of the depth of feeling out there for England and Wales’ best landscapes.” 

 

Green Belt 'being eroded at an alarming rate' – Campaign to Protect Rural England         

460,000 houses being planned for land that will be released from the Green Belt, while the percentage of ‘affordable’ homes built continues to fall

The Green Belt remains under severe pressure, despite government commitments to its protection, according to a new report from the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE).

CPRE’s annual State of the Green Belt report highlights that there are currently 460,000 homes being planned to be built on land that will soon be released from the Green Belt. Moving Green Belt boundaries when reviewing local plans makes it easier for local authorities to release land for housing, but is only supposed to take place under ‘exceptional circumstances’. This strategic shrinking of the Green Belt, as a way of getting around its protected status, is as harmful as building on the Green Belt itself.

The report also demonstrates that building on the Green Belt is not solving the affordable housing crisis, and will not do so. Last year 72% of homes built on greenfield land within the Green Belt were unaffordable by the government’s definition. 

Of the 460,000 homes that are planned to be built on land that will be released from the Green Belt, the percentage of unaffordable homes will increase to 78%.

CPRE warns that this release of land looks set to continue, as one third of local authorities with Green Belt land will find themselves with an increase in housing targets, due to a new method for calculating housing demand. The London (Metropolitan) Green Belt will be the biggest casualty.

Tom Fyans, Director of Campaigns and Policy at the Campaign to Protect Rural England, said: ‘We are being sold a lie by many developers. As they sell off and gobble up the Green Belt to build low density, unaffordable housing, young families go on struggling to afford a place to live. The affordable housing crisis must be addressed with increasing urgency, while acknowledging that far from providing the solution, building on the Green Belt only serves to entrench the issue. The government is failing in its commitment to protect the Green Belt – it is being eroded at an alarming rate. But it is essential, if the Green Belt is to fulfil its main purposes and provide 30 million of us with access to the benefits of the countryside, that the redevelopment of brownfield land is prioritised, and Green Belt protection strengthened.’

 

The first test for the National Planning Policy Framework - Woodland Trust blog

By Victoria Bankes Price, Planning Advisor 

The Government's revised National Planning Policy Framework (NPPF) is already making big waves. Published in July, it puts the protection of ancient woodland and ancient and veteran trees in England on par with the best of our built heritage. Damage or destruction is now only permitted in ‘wholly exceptional’ circumstances. But while this has already resulted in rejected applications, other cases might be more of a challenge.

Councils are already turning down applications where no wholly exceptional reasons justify the loss of ancient woods and trees. For example, Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council has refused an application for the erection of a detached dwelling and associated works. It stated that ‘the application site falls within…an area of ancient semi-natural woodland…there are no wholly exceptional reasons for such loss in this instance. The development is therefore contrary to Section 15 of the National Planning Policy Framework (2018).’

It's great to see local planning authorities using the NPPF. But some applications are more complicated.   Maidstone Borough Council is wrangling with one such application. Click through to read more.

 

Light aircraft used to target illegal abstraction investigations - Environment Agency

Information gathered from the air is helping the Environment Agency protect nature and wildlife.

The Environment Agency in the East Midlands is the first area in the country to use digital imaging collected by light aircraft to put a stop to illegal abstractions from rivers and streams.  The information obtained from the operation is now helping the Environment Agency to effectively target high invasion areas and carry out targeted abstraction patrols to catch illegal abstractors and put a stop to illegal abstraction that can cause harm to the environment and wildlife.  The Environment Agency manages abstraction to balance the needs of the environment with the rights of existing lawful water users during periods of dry weather.

Aerial image of an irrigation boom, used by farmers to water their crops. (image: Environment Agency)Aerial image of an irrigation boom, used by farmers to water their crops. (image: Environment Agency)

93 abstraction licences in the East Midlands have had restrictions placed on them in the last few weeks to reduce abstractions and 16 licence holders have been told to cease abstracting completely.  To ensure abstractors are complying with the new restrictions, Environment Officers will be carrying out high visibility patrols throughout the East Midlands to check that abstractors keep within the conditions of their licence and do not cause harm to the environment.

  

   

Eye in the sky reveals hidden alien invaders – SNH

The Spey Fisheries Board and the Scottish Invasive Species Initiative have located hidden patches of the invasive non-native Giant hogweed and Japanese Knotweed plants, thanks to a high-tech drone flying over the River Spey.

Aerial photograph of woodland below Fochabers. Giant hogweed can be seen as areas of white dots, and Japanese knotweed showing as bright lime green colouring between the trees. © Matthew Harmsworth@ROAVRAerial photograph of woodland below Fochabers. Giant hogweed can be seen as areas of white dots, and Japanese knotweed showing as bright lime green colouring between the trees. © Matthew Harmsworth@ROAVR

The comprehensive aerial photography survey of the lower stretch of the River Spey from Fochabers to Spey Bay was funded by Crown Estate Scotland.

Brian Shaw, biologist with the Spey Fisheries Board explained: “We’ve been tackling invasive species along the River Spey for a number of years now, particularly working on Giant hogweed, and we have made excellent progress upstream of Fochabers. We are confident that the upper river is now clear of these pesky plants and we’ve gradually been working our way downstream. We are now turning our attention to the lower Spey - but the woodland alongside the river is really dense and finding the plants is extremely difficult, it’s like fighting through a jungle! By using aerial photography, we are able to ensure we aren’t missing anything.”

Despite the good results so far, Spey Project Officer for the Scottish Invasives Species Initiative, James Symonds, pointed out there’s still more work to do: “The survey was fantastic, but it did reveal some huge stands of Knotweed and Hogweed that we were previously unaware of so there will be a lot more hard work over the next few years until we can get these areas under control - but I’m up for the challenge!”

 

Wildlife flourishes with return to sustainable farming - National Trust

A pioneering new project that involves reverting back to traditional 1940s farming methods has transformed a stretch of coastline into a haven for rare animals, birds and wildflowers – boosting numbers in some instances by more than 300 per cent.

The tried and tested ‘strip field’ farming involved flower crops being planted alongside more traditional arable crops and wildflower meadows across 45 hectares (111 acres) of farmland near the spectacular Worms Head in Rhossili, South Wales, cared for by the National Trust.

And, just two years after the project started, the stretch of coastline has been restored to its former glory and boasts a stunning array of rare birds such as the grasshopper warbler, common linnet and hen harriers.

Butterflies such as the small blue, grayling and wall brown butterflies have also returned to their former habitat.

It is hoped this approach to farming could be used by larger, more intensive farms.

Four National Trust rangers and 80 volunteers have spent the last 12 months faithfully recreating the 12th Century patchwork of fields on The Vile, creating 2,000 metres of new banks and new hedges which had previously been removed after the Second World War in favour of modern, intensive farming methods.

Instead of just six fields, there are now 17 which have been purposely planted with specially selected flowering crops to include 400,000 sunflowers, poppies, lavender and lupins which punctuate the crops of millet, wheat, oats, buckwheat, spelt, linseed and barley with ribbons of vibrant colour. 

 

Cumbria habitats surveyed for first time - Yorkshire Dales National Park

Ecologists are for the first time assessing the condition of ‘priority habitats’ in the parts of Cumbria and Lancashire that became part of the Yorkshire Dales National Park in 2016.

The Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority (YDNPA) has commissioned Otley-based ecologists, Haycock & Jay Associates, to survey up to four thousand hectares of vitally important habitats such as upland hay meadow, native woodland and blanket bog.

The firm began work in May, and by the end of next month will have surveyed priority habitats in an area including the parishes of Tebay, Firbank, Killington, Middleton, Barbon, Mansergh, Kirkby Lonsdale, Casterton, Leck, Barrow-with-Burrow and Ireby where landowner permission has been granted.

To see how the ecologists carry out the work, read our latest blog, which illustrates how an ancient semi-natural woodland near Sedbergh was surveyed earlier this summer.

YDNPA Senior Wildlife Conservation Officer, Tony Serjeant, who is responsible for the survey, said:  “It is exciting that for the first time we are taking a close look at the state of the most important habitats in the newest parts of the National Park.  These areas have not been surveyed in this way before, so we are breaking new ground."

 

Arboriculture, including tree disease

Unprecedented fire destroys years of work at Cwmcarn Forest - Natural Resources Wales

Cwmbran (image: NRW)Natural Resources Wales (NRW) is looking at how it can restore large areas of woodland after fires devastated Twmbarlwm in Cwmcarn forest over the last three weeks.

The fires, which started on 13 July, have destroyed up to 250 hectares of woodland, roughly the size of 250 rugby pitches.

This has caused a huge amount of environmental damage and destroyed tens of thousands of newly planted trees, undoing years of work and investment by NRW.

Large areas were being replanted with native broadleaf species and timber-producing conifers following large-scale felling operations to combat the spread of larch disease.

Helicopters, drones, excavators and tractors were all used as part of the multi-agency response that included NRW, South Wales Fire and Rescue (SWFR) and Gwent Police.

NRW staff worked long hours cutting firebreaks around the affected area and supporting firefighters from SWFR who tackled the fire itself.

The fire has now been extinguished and NRW staff continue to monitor smaller smouldering areas of the woodland and have taken actions to prevent ash runoff polluting local streams. 

 

Ash dieback hits Park - Yorkshire Dales National Park

Ash dieback disease has spread “phenomenally quickly” right across the Yorkshire Dales National Park, hitting its most treasured and ancient woodlands, the Park Authority’s Senior Trees and Woodlands Officer, Geoff Garrett, has said.

Infected young ash trees – with branches bare against the summer sky – can be seen on roadsides verges all around the Park, as well as in woodlands, only six years after the first case of ash dieback was confirmed in the UK.  

Ancient semi-natural woodland covers about 1% of the Yorkshire Dales National Park.  About 80% of this woodland is made up of ash, making it the iconic tree of the Dales.  

The National Park Authority has responded to the spread of ash dieback by removing ash from all tree-planting schemes.  There is currently no cure for the disease.  

Geoff Garrett said: “Over the next 20 years the disease is going to have a devastating impact, so much so that ash will likely become relatively minor in the landscape.  Mature trees will take decades to die, but young trees are being killed off very quickly. “There is little we can do to tackle the disease itself, but there is a lot we can do to manage the decline of ash trees by making sure that the spaces they leave are filled by other native trees.”

For further information and photos see the blog.

 

National Park seeks seed collectors for major tree project - North York Moors National Park

The North York Moors National Park Authority is looking to recruit a team of volunteer seed gatherers to help build a collection of native seeds from ancient woodlands and veteran trees. The project will see up to 40,000 seeds collected from species including oak, hazel, holly, juniper and rowan. Following collection, the seeds will be grown on by local nurseries, and then used in future woodland creation projects in the National Park.

Evidence shows that the North York Moors was almost entirely covered in woodland before humans started clearing them; now, only 4% of the area is woodland of ancient origin. The planting of new woodland habitats is a key element of the National Park Authority’s conservation efforts. However, sourcing seeds of local provenance - those that are genetically similar to the native trees of the local area - is extremely challenging.

Alasdair Fagan, Woodland Creation Officer at the North York Moors National Park Authority, explains the importance of provenance: “Planting seedlings of local provenance has long been encouraged, as it is generally believed that these trees will be genetically adapted to best cope with local climate, pests and diseases. In particular, we are interested in collecting as many seeds as possible from ancient and veteran trees, sometimes aged up to 400 years old, as the genetic makeup of these trees has clearly allowed them to withstand the test of time. Having said that, the threat of climate change means that planting for current local conditions may no longer be the best approach, not if we wish to maximise  the chances of these trees living for 100 years plus. We are therefore aiming to plant all our new woodlands with a healthy mix of local provenance trees, along with trees from other areas of the UK, particularly further south.”

 

Wales' Celtic Rainforests to be restored - Snowdonia National Park Authority

Thanks to European and Welsh Government funding, this autumn will mark the start of a new chapter for Wales’ Celtic rainforests which are currently in an unfavourable condition. Through the eradication of invasive alien plant species and the implementation of proactive management the aim is to bring these woodlands back to their former fertile state.

(image: Snowdonia National Park Authority)Celtic rainforests, which are mainly found in the UK, are considered of European importance owing to their open structure, and the mild and humid conditions within them that provide a perfect habitat for a wealth of vegetation.

(image: Snowdonia National Park Authority)

The woodlands are currently in an unfavourable condition and are continuing to deteriorate. The spread of the Rhododendron ponticum is primarily responsible for the deterioration because it alters the soil condition, prevents sunlight from reaching the woodland floor, and outcompetes and suppresses the regeneration of native vegetation. Other factors that affect the woodlands are over or under grazing, lack of management and atmospheric nitrogen pollution.

Four areas within Wales, including Snowdonia, Cwm Einion, Cwm Doethie and the Elan Valley, will benefit from funding by the EU LIFE programme, the Welsh Government’s Green Infrastructure Capital Grant and other partners to address these issues. The Snowdonia National Park Authority will lead the project on behalf of its partners that include RSPB Cymru, Natural Resources Wales, Welsh Water, the Woodland Trust, and the National Trust. The €9.5 million project will run between August 2018 and July 2025.

The project’s main aim is to improve the habitat of lower plant assemblage such as mosses and liverworts within these woodlands by tackling the issue of invasive species, especially the Rhododendron ponticum, that threaten the conservation status of the woodlands. The project will also develop active management of the woodland including demonstrating active grazing and woodland restoration techniques which in turn will improve habitat condition, demonstrate best practice, increase resilience and enhance the woodlands’ ecosystem function.

 

Dig for victory… against tree pests and diseases - Woodland Trust

The Woodland Trust has created an accreditation scheme to highlight when nurseries sell trees of UK provenance (Photo:  Phil Formby)The Woodland Trust is preparing for this year’s tree planting season by asking businesses and individuals across the UK to make sure any trees put into the ground are from – and have been grown on – home soil.

The Woodland Trust has created an accreditation scheme to highlight when nurseries sell trees of UK provenance (Photo:  Phil Formby)

The conservation charity has created an accreditation scheme to highlight when nurseries sell trees of UK provenance. This means that tree planters and garden lovers can make sure saplings have come from a safe source, and will not be contributing to the spread of pests and diseases from other countries. 

Between 1970 and 2013, 267 introduced plant pathogens became established in Great Britain – and two thirds of these were native to continental Europe. More recently it has been announced that a new pest, the zigzag elm sawfly, has entered the country – presumably on imported tree stock. The same can be said for ash dieback, which was first confirmed in the UK in 2012.

Lee Dudley, projects manager for the Woodland Trust, said:  “The Woodland Trust has been exclusively planting UK trees since 2012, but we need more people to follow suit. Essentially we want to create a consumer movement geared towards planting trees of UK provenance. Together we can protect our countryside land against tree pests and diseases. “Our UK Sourced and Grown accreditation scheme is a stamp of approval; it allows trees to be bought with peace of mind, and means saplings can be traced back to where they came from. We want more people to ask where their trees come from, and nurseries can ask to join the 21 nurseries that are already part of the programme.”

 

Pollution, sustainablity and climate.

Heatwave and climate change having negative impact on our soil say experts – University of Manchester

The recent heatwave and drought could be having a deeper, more negative effect on soil than we first realised say scientists.

This could have widespread implications for plants and other vegetation which, in turn, may impact on the wider entire ecosystem.

That’s because organisms in soil are highly diverse and are responsible not only for producing the soil we need to grow crops, but also provide humans with many other benefits, such as cleaning water and regulating greenhouse gas emissions

The new study, led by researchers at The University of Manchester which has been published in Nature Communications, provides new insight into how a drought alters soil at microbial level. It shows that expected changes in climate will affect UK soil and that soil is not as tough as previously thought.

Due to climate change, disturbances such as drought are increasing in intensity and frequency. These extreme weather conditions change vegetation composition and soil moisture, which in turn impacts the soil’s underlying organisms and microbial networks.

By studying how microbes react to severe drought, the study provides a better understanding of how underground soil networks respond to such environmental disturbances.

Lead author, Dr Franciska de Vries, from Manchester’s School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, explains: “Soils harbour highly diverse microbial communities that are crucial for soil to function as it should. A major challenge is to understand how these complex microbial communities respond to and recover from disturbances, such as climate extremes, which are predicted to increase in frequency and intensity with climate change."

 

Planet at risk of heading towards “Hothouse Earth” state - Stockholm Resilience Centre

Keeping global warming to within 1.5-2°C may be more difficult than previously assessed

Story highlights

  • Even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call “Hothouse Earth” conditions
  • A “Hothouse Earth” climate will in the long term stabilize at a global average of 4-5°C higher than pre-industrial temperatures with sea level 10-60 m higher than today
  • Maximizing the chances of avoiding a “Hothouse Earth” requires not only reduction of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions but also enhancement and/or creation of new biological carbon stores

An international team of scientists has published a study in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) showing that even if the carbon emission reductions called for in the Paris Agreement are met, there is a risk of Earth entering what the scientists call “Hothouse Earth” conditions.

A “Hothouse Earth” climate will in the long term stabilize at a global average of 4-5°C higher than pre-industrial temperatures with sea level 10-60 m higher than today, the paper says.

The authors conclude it is now urgent to greatly accelerate the transition towards an emission-free world economy.

"Human emissions of greenhouse gas are not the sole determinant of temperature on Earth. Our study suggests that human-induced global warming of 2°C may trigger other Earth system processes, often called “feedbacks”, that can drive further warming - even if we stop emitting greenhouse gases," says lead author Will Steffen from the Australian National University and Stockholm Resilience Centre.

"Avoiding this scenario requires a redirection of human actions from exploitation to stewardship of the Earth system.”

Currently, global average temperatures are just over 1°C above pre-industrial and rising at 0.17°C per decade.

 

Next generation of leaders to join fight against plastic pollution - defra

Government has announced new partnership with UK Scouts to inspire and empower young people to tackle plastic pollution.

Young people across the country will join together to tackle plastic pollution through a new partnership between the UK Scouts and Government.  Harnessing the enthusiasm of the UK’s girl and boy Scouts, the Government will create and distribute a new Plastics and Marine Environment Activity Pack to help them in efforts to slash the amount of single-use plastics in our oceans. Recognising the need for global action, this toolkit will be supported by a new international exchange programme, allowing Scouts from the UK and Kenya to visit one another and learn how important the issue of plastics is in different parts of the world.

Litter collection in Limehouse Cut (Credit: Leigh Thompson, UK Scouts via defra)Litter collection in Limehouse Cut (Credit: Leigh Thompson, UK Scouts via defra) 

The announcement was made by the Prime Minister during her visit to Africa this week, where she also pledged almost £40,000 for a new Girl Guides and Scouts Plastic Challenge Badge This will help an estimated 50,000 young people in Kenya and two further African countries, to better understand the importance of reducing plastic consumption.

The new partnership will build on the work the Scouts are already doing as part of their A Million Hands programme which gives young people the chance to take action with issues they care about.  This summer Scouts have been working with the Canal & River Trust to collect plastic and other litter from canals and rivers across the country. By doing this they have already built better outdoor spaces to bring communities together all across the UK.

 

Survey reveals littering is on the increase – Keep Britain Tidy

Today (Monday 6 Aug) we reveal the results of our annual survey of the state of England’s streets and unfortunately it’s not great news, with Image: Keep Britain Tidythe results showing that littering has increased since the survey was last carried out in 2014/15.

Image: Keep Britain Tidy

A total of 7,200 sites across the country were surveyed, with 14% found to be at an unacceptable standard for litter (a 4% increase).

The most commonly littered item is cigarette butts, found on 79% of sites. The following three most littered items, all ‘food and drink on the go’ related, are confectionery packs (found on 60% of sites), soft drink bottles and cans (52%) and fast food related litter (33%).

The top ten most littered items are:

  1. Smoking related litter
  2. Confectionery packs
  3. Soft drink bottles and cans
  4. Fast-food related
  5. Alcoholic drinks bottles and cans

6.  Packaging

7.  Snack packs

8.  Vehicle parts

9.  Discarded food and drink

10. Clothing

As well as being unsightly, litter is a serious social, economic and environmental issue. It causes harm to communities and wildlife, and in an era where local authorities’ budgets are coming under increasing pressure, costs over £1billion each year to clear up. Yet it is entirely preventable.

 

CPRE’s ‘Green Clean’ gives litter pickers cash for trash - CPRE

The reverse vending machine in Brigg, Lincolnshire (image: CPRE)With a deposit return system on the way, come and help the Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE) clean up the countryside and get money for any bottles and cans you find.

The reverse vending machine in Brigg, Lincolnshire (image: CPRE)

Throughout September, CPRE is organising a series of nationwide litter picks to clean up the countryside ahead of the introduction of a deposit return system – which will help prevent our countryside, towns and cities from being littered with bottles and cans.

CPRE will be taking its mobile reverse vending machine – which collects drinks containers of all materials and sizes – to various ‘Green Clean’ litter picks being held across the country. Participating volunteers will be able to dispose of, and receive 10p for, each of the drinks containers collected, helping people become accustomed to the way that a deposit system works, ahead of the introduction of such a scheme in England. In many countries, reverse vending machines are already used by consumers to recycle used drinks containers and reclaim deposits, boosting recycling rates in those countries to as high as 97%.

 

Plans to cut harmful pollution from domestic burning set out - defra

Ways to promote cleaner domestic burning and cut harmful pollution by stopping the sale of the most polluting fuels are set out in a consultation issued today (17/8/18).

Proposals to promote cleaner domestic burning and cut harmful pollution by prohibiting the sale of the most polluting fuels have been laid out in a government consultation published today. The burning of wood and coal in the home is the largest single contributor to particulate matter pollution - identified by the World Health Organization as the most damaging air pollutant.  Domestic burning contributes 38% of particulate matter pollution, compared with 16% from industrial combustion and only 12% from road transport.

The government therefore plans to ensure that, in future, only the cleanest fuels are available for sale. Delivering a commitment in the government’s Clean Air Strategy, the consultation proposes preventing 8,000 tonnes of harmful particulate matter from entering the atmosphere each year by:

  • Restricting the sale of wet wood for domestic burning
  • Applying sulphur standards and smoke emission limits to all solid fuels
  • Phasing out the sale of traditional house coal

The government’s Clean Air Strategy - welcomed by the World Health Organization who said it was “appreciating actions taken by the United Kingdom government to protect its citizens from this silent killer” - also set out proposals to tackle air pollution from a range of other sources including:

  • Publishing new guidance for farmers, advisors and contractors to help them reduce ammonia emissions and invest in infrastructure and equipment
  • Working with international partners to research and develop new standards for tyres and brakes to enable us to address toxic non-exhaust emissions of micro plastics from vehicles which can pollute air and water. A call for evidence was launched last month.

This is in addition to our £3.5 billion plan to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from road transport.

  

Air quality: using cleaner fuels for domestic burning - defra Open consultation

The consultation closes on 12 October.

Take part in the consultation here.

 

By coincidence published the same day as the Government's consultation was launched: Particulate pollution's impact varies greatly depending on where it originated - Carnegie Institution for Science via EurekAlert

Impact aerosols have on the climate varies greatly depending on where they were released

Read the paper: Geeta G. Persad et al, Divergent global-scale temperature effects from identical aerosols emitted in different regions, Nature Communications (2018). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-018-05838-6

 

SEPA to end exemptions for burning farm plastics - Scottish Environment Protection Agency

The Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) has announced its next steps to stem the plastic tide by confirming it will end exemptions for burning most types of agricultural waste from 1 January 2019.

Whilst a change in Scotland’s environmental regulations in 2013 meant farmers could continue burning plastics only under an exemption, the agency is moving to reduce the environmental impacts of farm waste.

The move, which will affect silage wrap, crop covers, fertiliser bags and containers, follows extensive engagement between SEPA and Zero Waste Scotland. SEPA has also worked closely with NFU Scotland to roll out the change which will feature ongoing dialogue with farmers and crofters over the coming months.

Ending the exemption will not only align with the legal requirement for all Scottish businesses to present plastics and other items separately for collection, but will help boost the Scottish market for recycled plastics.

SEPA, NFU Scotland and Zero Waste Scotland have developed a simple set of resources for Scottish farmers, including a list of Scottish recyclers who stand ready to help farmers get plastic waste sorted.

Further information is available from www.sepa.org.uk/farmplastics. 

 

Scientific Research, Results and Publications.

Animal and wildlife

Male birds sing less to females on antidepressants – University of York

During courtship male starlings sing less to females who have been fed dilute concentrations of antidepressants, according to a new study led by the University of York.

Dilute concentrations of Prozac similar to those measured at sewage works appeared to make female starlings less attractive to the opposite sex. Image credit: Liam SmithDilute concentrations of Prozac similar to those measured at sewage works appeared to make female starlings less attractive to the opposite sex. Image credit: Liam Smith

The researchers studied the birds at sewage works where they flock to feed all year round. The worms, maggots and flies at sewage treatment plants have been found to contain many different pharmaceuticals, including Prozac.

The study showed that dilute concentrations of Prozac similar to those measured at sewage works appeared to make female starlings less attractive to the opposite sex. 

Behavioural changes 

In 2016, there were 64.7 million antidepressant items prescribed in the UK. Some of these compounds are stable in the environment and break down slowly once they’ve passed through our bodies and into sewage-treatment systems.

Dr Kathryn Arnold and Sophia Whitlock, from the Environment Department at the University of York, have been studying the effects of environmental levels of fluoxetine (commonly known as Prozac) on starlings for a number of years. They have discovered changes in the behaviour of these starlings that could put birds at risk in the wild.

Sophia Whitlock, researcher on the project, said: “Singing is a key part of courtship for birds, used by males to court favoured females and used by females to choose the highest quality male to father their chicks. Males sang more than twice as often and as long to untreated females compared to females that had been receiving low doses of Prozac.”

 

Bird Surveyors help to shed new light on changing mammal populations - BTO

The UK’s mammals present particular challenges for monitoring; they live in a wide variety of habitats, vary enormously in size and can be very difficult to see, but Britain’s army of volunteer bird surveyors could come to the rescue.

In a scientific paper, just published in the journal Biological Conservation, British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) scientists reveal how and where numbers of nine UK mammal species are changing, using data collected by the BTO/JNCC/RSPB Breeding Bird Survey (BBS), and it makes for interesting reading. Three of the four deer species monitored show increasing abundance across a significant part of their UK ranges, with only Red Deer appearing stable. One of the biggest surprises, however, is the large scale declines in Red Fox populations in the countryside; in central-southern England and Wales between 20% and 50% of foxes have been lost in the last 20 years.
There is no single survey technique that adequately covers all of Britain’s mammals but some mammals are known to cause problems for other species or to cause economic damage, while others are of conservation concern; having a robust assessment of their populations is a priority.
One way to achieve this is to tap into an existing monitoring framework, aimed at different taxa but through which additional data can be collected. This is already done by the volunteers participating in the BBS. This survey, which was launched in 1994 to monitor widespread breeding birds, has since been extended to include mammals. Robust mammal trends are now produced annually, for the UK, for the four individual countries and for nine English regions using data collected by BBS volunteers.

Read the paper here

    

New study reveals reasons for huge decline of rare seabird - RSPB

Lack of food driving loss of Arctic skuas

Arctic skuas could become extinct as a breeding species in the UK a new study by the RSPB’s Centre for Conservation Science, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, has revealed. The study found that the main driver of an 81% population decline is a huge decrease in breeding success, caused by a reduction in the food, particularly sandeels, available to the birds at the crucial time of year they need to feed their young.

Conservation scientists studied data from 33 Arctic skua colonies between 1992 and 2015. These colonies hold around a third of the UK’s breeding population of Arctic skuas, all of which are found in Scotland.

Dr Allan Perkins, Senior Conservation Scientist at RSPB Scotland and the study’s lead author said: “We’ve known for many years that Arctic skuas numbers have been going down in Scotland but this study reveals just how bad the declines have been at some of their most important breeding sites. Lack of food has been the biggest pressure for these birds and shows just how vulnerable our seabirds and marine life are; as sandeel numbers have declined around these key north-east areas in Scotland the whole food chain is impacted. If these sharp declines continue, it’s possible that Arctic skuas will be lost as a breeding species in Scotland.”

Arctic skuas are medium sized seabirds with pointed falcon-like wings and long pointed tail feathers. Unusually, there are two colours types; dark brown all over, or a dark brown back with white face and chest. They are rare red listed breeding birds in the UK; Scotland lies at the southern edge of their global breeding range, and their UK stronghold is in Shetland and Orkney. The loss of them as a breeding species here would not only mean a loss for UK biodiversity but also a contraction in the global range of these birds.

Read the paper here.

 

Study reveals 'intriguing' data on popular bird - The Game & Wildlife Conservation Trust

BREEDING woodcock are more common in larger, better connected and more varied woodland areas in Britain, a new study has shown.

Researchers looking to understand how management could affect woodcock breeding success have discovered that a mixture of different tree types create an ideal environment for the much-loved wading bird.

GWCT PhD student Chris Heward  tagging a woodcock (image: GWCT)Habitat correlates of Eurasian Woodcock Scolopax rusticola abundance in a declining resident population is a new paper that compares a wide range of different woodland sites across the UK with relation to the number of breeding woodcock present.

GWCT PhD student Chris Heward  tagging a woodcock (image: GWCT)

Birch trees formed a key part of much of their preferred habitat, possibly because their dense trunks create safe feeding ground and their leaf litter support more earthworms on which woodcock can feed. The combination of mixed woodland, interspersed with open spaces, provides a variety of habitats for the various stages of the breeding season. This information could help to inform future woodland management advice. Hundreds of volunteers visited pre-selected woodland sites across the UK and recorded ’roding’ woodcock at dusk during May and June – the period when this unique display behaviour is at its peak.

Access the paper here

 

Red light at night: A potentially fatal attraction to migratory bats - Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research

Flying bat © Christian GieseFlying bat © Christian Giese

Night time light pollution is rapidly increasing across the world. Nocturnal animals are likely to be especially affected but how they respond to artificial light is still largely unknown. In a new study, scientists from the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research (Leibniz-IZW) in Berlin, Germany, tested the response of European bats to red and white light sources during their seasonal migration. Soprano pipistrelles (Pipistrellus pygmaeus) and, to a lesser degree, Nathusius’ pipistrelles (Pipistrellus nathusii) were recorded more frequently near red LED light, indicating that the animals might be attracted to red light during their migration. In contrast, the scientists did not observe such behaviour near white LED lights. The wavelength of the experimental red LED lights was similar to that of red safety lights used for indicating the presence of wind turbines or tall buildings to aircraft pilots. Warning lights such as these might therefore lure migrating bats precisely towards the danger which the lights help people to avoid. Switching to more bat friendly lights or deploying on-demand lighting – which only turns on if an airplane approaches – would most likely reduce bat collisions and bat casualties at wind power stations. The study has just been published in the scientific journal Ecology and Evolution.

Each year, light pollution increases by around six per cent worldwide. In particular, energy efficient and cheap LEDs are more and more used. Light is an important cue for orientation used by many animals, and also influences their diurnal rhythms and behaviour. It is well established that bats are sensitive to light while hunting at night. While some species are attracted to artificial light sources because of the insects nearby, most bat species generally avoid artificial light. Most previous studies examined the response of bats to artificial light during non-migratory periods. It is already well-known that artificial light causes disorientation in birds that migrate at night. Does the same apply to bats? Many bat species also travel for several hundred or even thousand kilometres during their annual migration, yet we know virtually nothing about their response to artificial light.

Access the paper: Voigt CC, Rehnig K, Lindecke O, Pētersons G (2018): Migratory bats are attracted by red light but not by warm-white light: Implications for the protection of nocturnal migrants. Ecology and Evolution.

 

The more pesticides bees eat, the more they like them - Imperial College London

Bumblebees acquire a taste for pesticide-laced food as they become more exposed to it, a behaviour showing possible symptoms of addiction.

Bumblebee eating from a flower (Image credit: Andres Arce)This study of bumblebee behaviour indicates that the risk of pesticide-contaminated food entering bee colonies may be higher than previously thought, which can have impacts on colony reproductive success. In research published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a team from Imperial College London and Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have shown that bumblebee colonies increasingly feed on pesticide-laced food (sugar solution) over time.

Bumblebee eating from a flower (Image credit: Andres Arce)

The researchers tested the controversial class of pesticides the ‘neonicotinoids’, which are currently one of the most widely used classes of pesticides worldwide, despite the near-total ban in the EU. The impact of neonicotinoids on bees is hotly debated, and the ban is a decision that has received mixed views.

Lead researcher Dr Richard Gill, from the Department of Life Sciences at Imperial, said: “Given a choice, naïve bees appear to avoid neonicotinoid-treated food. However, as individual bees increasingly experience the treated food they develop a preference for it. Interestingly, neonicotinoids target nerve receptors in insects that are similar to receptors targeted by nicotine in mammals. Our findings that bumblebees acquire a taste for neonicotinoids ticks certain symptoms of addictive behaviour, which is intriguing given the addictive properties of nicotine on humans, although more research is needed to determine this in bees.”

Access the paper:Foraging bumblebees acquire a preference for neonicotinoid treated food with prolonged exposure’ by Andres N. Arce, Ana Ramos Rodrigues, Jiajun Yu, Thomas J. Colgan, Yannick Wurm and Richard J. Gill is published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

 

New generation of pesticides can reduce bumblebee reproduction - Royal Holloway, University of London

A study published by researchers from Royal Holloway has concluded that newly developed pesticides, which could potentially replace neonicotinoid insecticides, may reduce the reproductive success of bumblebees.

PhD student Harry Siviter, alongside Professor Mark Brown, and Dr Ellouise Leadbeater, all from the School of Biological Sciences at Royal Holloway, tested the effects of a sulfoximine-based insecticide – which is currently licensed for use in 47 countries around the world, and is under review for licensing in the UK - on bumblebee colonies.

In their experiment, exposure to sulfoxaflor, the first branded sulfoximine based insecticide, reduced both the size of bumblebee colonies and the number of male offspring they produced, with a 54% reduction in the total number of sexual offspring produced in exposed colonies. Their study is pre-emptive, because sulfoxaflor is a new product and we currently have limited data about the levels to which bees are likely to be exposed in the pollen and nectar of sprayed crops. However, such impacts identify that broad use of sulfoxaflor pesticides could have the potential to harm wild bumblebee populations, under certain conditions.

 

Study reveals severe decline of mountain hares – Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

Mountain hares turn white in winter Picture: Tom Marshall/RSPBMountain hare numbers on moorlands in parts of the eastern Highlands in Scotland have declined to less than one per cent of their levels in the 1950s, according to a long-term scientific study led by the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology.

Mountain hares turn white in winter Picture: Tom Marshall/RSPB

Counts of the mammal on moorland managed for red grouse shooting and on neighbouring mountain land from the past seven decades were analysed for the paper by CEH and the RSPB.

The study, published in the British Ecological Society’s Journal of Applied Ecology shows that, from 1954 to 1999, the mountain hare population on moorland sites fell by nearly five per cent every year. This long-term moorland decline is likely to be due to land use changes such as the loss of grouse moors to conifer forests, and is reflective of wider population declines that mountain hares are facing across their range.

However, from 1999 to 2017, the scale of the moorland declines increased dramatically to more than 30% every year, leading to counts in 2017 of less than one per cent of levels in 1954. The dominant land use in these sites was intensive grouse moor management. The unregulated practice of hare culling as a form of disease control, ostensibly to benefit red grouse, has become part of the management of many estates since the 1990s.

On higher, alpine sites numbers of mountain hares fluctuated greatly, but increased overall until 2007, and then declined, although not to the unprecedented lows seen on moorland sites.

Dr Adam Watson, a Fellow of the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, who has been studying mountain hares in the eastern Highlands for 75 years, is the lead author of the new paper entitled, Seven decades of Mountain Hare counts show severe declines where high-yield recreational game bird hunting is practised.

“I find the decline in numbers of these beautiful animals both compelling and of great concern” - Dr Adam Watson

Responses: 

GWCT's response to mountain hare study

In response to the publication of the Watson and Wilson (2018) paper on mountain hare populations, David Noble, Chairman (Scotland) of GWCT, said: “We are delighted that the authors of this paper recognise that that mountain hares thrive on heather moorland managed for red grouse, that their numbers can increase quickly in such areas and that the long-term threat to their population is from landscape scale habitat change, especially coniferous tree planting.”

Catastrophic declines of mountain hares: what RSPB Scotland believes should happen next - RSPB Community.

James Silvey, Species and Habitats Officer (All Nature) at RSPB Scotland takes a look what a recent paper on mountain hare numbers means for the species 

SNH response to mountain hares report: Here's our position on recent mountain hare research

  

Newly sequenced golden eagle genome will help its conservation - Wellcome Sanger Institute

The golden eagle is the first of 25 UK species to be completed as part of the 25 Genomes Project

Golden Eagle - the first UK species to have its DNA read by the Sanger Institute as part of its 25 genomes for 25 years project. Image credit: Martin Mecnarowski, Wikimedia Commons. Golden Eagle - the first UK species to have its DNA read by the Sanger Institute as part of its 25 genomes for 25 years project. Image credit: Martin Mecnarowski, Wikimedia Commons (via WSI).

Conservation and monitoring efforts for the golden eagle will benefit from the newly-completed golden eagle genome sequence – the first of 25 species’ genomes sequenced by the Wellcome Sanger Institute, in collaboration with the University of Edinburgh.

The golden eagle genome, released today (31 August), will help scientists and conservationists understand the diversity and viability of the species worldwide. It will ultimately aid the monitoring of existing, reinforced and reintroduced populations of golden eagles, such as those in the South of Scotland Golden Eagle translocation project, which aims to bolster the protected species’ population.

The genome will enable additional studies of golden eagles and will help in the conservation and monitoring of the species. The genetic information will aid in identifying populations or individuals that might be best involved in any reintroduction or other conservation projects.

Scientists from the University of Edinburgh’s Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies sent golden eagle samples to the Sanger Institute near Cambridge. The sequencing teams extracted DNA from the samples and used PacBio SMRT Sequencing technology to generate the first, high-quality golden eagle reference genome.

Dr Rob Ogden, Head of Conservation Genetics at the University of Edinburgh and a scientific adviser to the South of Scotland Golden Eagle Project: “With the golden eagle genome sequence, we will be able to compare the eagles being relocated to southern Scotland to those already in the area to ensure we are creating a genetically diverse population. We will also be able to start investigating the biological effects of any genetic differences that we detect, not only within the Scottish population, but worldwide.”

 

Burly bird gets the worm - University of Exeter

The pecking order of garden birds is determined by their size and weight, new research shows.

In a study at bird feeders, researchers from the University of Exeter and the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) found larger species like house sparrows and greenfinches monopolised the best food and spent longer feeding than smaller birds.

Meanwhile, smaller birds such as blue tits and coal tits had to feed quickly and were left with lower-quality food.  The researchers say the findings have “important implications” for using bird feeders as a conservation method.

“Bird feeding has become increasingly popular in the UK and throughout much of the world in recent decades,” said senior author Professor Jon Blount, of the Centre for Ecology and Conservation on the University of Exeter’s Penryn Campus in Cornwall. “However, its impacts are still poorly understood. Bird feeders create a concentrated food source which can result in more quarrels between individuals of different species, which we predicted would lead to the formation of a dominance hierarchy. Our findings show that larger, heavier species get better access to food – so if the aim of bird feeders is to benefit all species, we need to investigate ways to achieve this, such as different mixes of foods and feeder designs.”

Larger species like greenfinches spent longer feeding than smaller birds such as blue tits (image: Univeristy of Exeter)Larger species like greenfinches spent longer feeding than smaller birds such as blue tits (image: University of Exeter)

The researchers watched birds at feeders placed at woodland edges and hedgerows on the Penryn Campus. They found heavier bird species monopolised access to sunflower hearts – a food that had a “relatively short handling time”. Lighter species were left with sunflower seeds with the hull intact – a food that takes longer to open and eat. Heavier birds also pecked at a lower rate – while small ones pecked quickly to make the most of their limited time at the feeder.

Read the paper: “Effects of supplementary feeding on interspecific dominance hierarchies in garden birds

 

New research throws light on factors associated with the decline of Britain’s hedgehogs - People's Trust for Endangered Species

Results from the first systematic survey of rural hedgehog populations in England and Wales using footprint tracking tunnels has been published in Scientific Reports.

Summary of findings:

  • This was the first systematic survey of rural hedgehog populations in England and Wales using footprint tracking tunnels to measure the presence / absence of hedgehogs
  • Hedgehogs were present at only 21% of all the sites surveyed
  • Hedgehog presence was negatively affected by badger sett density. However, both badger setts and hedgehogs were absent from 27% of all sites, suggesting that there is a wider landscape issue affecting both species
  • Hedgehog presence was positively affected by the amount of built land (i.e. housing); areas of human habitation may, therefore, be acting as a “refuge” habitat from the problems associated with rural landscapes

Land Management and predation: The research, titled ‘Reduced occupancy of hedgehogs in rural England and Wales: the influence of habitat and an asymmetric intra-guild predator’, investigates the effects of the availability of key habitat types and badger (Meles meles) sett density on native hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus). The results show that while badger sett density is negatively correlated with hedgehog presence, there was evidence of both species co-existing and hedgehogs being positively associated with built habitat (e.g. houses). More worryingly, both hedgehogs and badger setts were not recorded at many of the sites surveyed, suggesting there is a much wider land management issue in our countryside affecting both species.

Read the paper (open access): Ben M. Williams, Philip J. Baker, Emily Thomas, Gavin Wilson, Johanna Judge & Richard W. Yarnell.  Reduced occupancy of hedgehogs (Erinaceus europaeus) in rural England and Wales: The influence of habitat and an asymmetric intra-guild predator  Scientific Reports volume 8, Article number: 12156 (2018)

  

Marine

Discovering why basking sharks come to Scotland - Scottish Natural Heritage

Discovering why basking sharks come to Scotland: Basking shark (c)Alex MustardScientists seeking to discover whether Scotland’s seas are a mating ground for basking sharks have gathered new footage showing the sharks being sociable, including a first look at groups forming on the seabed. These data have been gathered by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) and the University of Exeter as part of a new camera tagging project which launched earlier this month.

Discovering why basking sharks come to Scotland: Basking shark (image: © Alex Mustard via SNH)

Basking sharks are the second largest fish in the world, reaching lengths up to 10m. Despite their size and prevalence in Scotland’s seas, little is understood about their social behaviours.

“A large number of sharks appear each year just off the western coast of Scotland in the Sea of the Hebrides. However, there’s been limited research to show exactly what they’re doing here: do they come solely to feed on plankton, or are they courting each other and using our coast as a mating ground?” said Dr Suzanne Henderson, Policy and Advice Officer at SNH.

Researchers from SNH and the University of Exeter spent a week off the coast of Tobermory tagging three basking sharks using towed camera tags – the camera tags trail slightly behind the attachment point at the base of the main dorsal fin. It is believed this type of tag has never before been used on basking sharks. The video footage collected by the tags will give scientists a new understanding of basking shark group behaviour.   

 

University of Hull gives marine life a voice as new study reveals concerns over marine pollution - University of Hull

A striking protest that gives marine life a voice and helps initiate positive change to protect the future of our rivers and oceans has been launched by the University of Hull.

The Don’t Be Shellfish initiative has seen a stretch of the Humber Estuary, in the shadow of the landmark Humber Bridge in Hull, East Yorkshire, transformed into an arresting picket line. The University, which is leading on a series of research projects to address environmental issues of global importance, has created the protest to raise awareness of the harmful impact of plastic pollution and the rising acidity levels on marine life in oceans, and encourage people to take positive action.

A series of slogan carrying placards have been planted in the water to highlight the challenges facing different types of marine life. The protest has been made to look like it has been organised by marine life who have banded together to protest against the conditions in which they are forced to live and the threat this poses to their livelihoods.

As part of the campaign, a new study by the University of Hull and YouGov has revealed that Brits are concerned about the effect of marine pollution on both marine and human life.

 

Unprecedented variety of whales and dolphins species recorded around the UK during last week - Sea Watch Foundation

National Whale and Dolphin Watch 2018 volunteer observers looking out for whales and dolphins at Eyemouth Fort, Scotland. Photo credit: St Abbs & Eyemouth Voluntary Marine Reserve.An unprecedented variety of species of whales and dolphins (cetaceans) have been seen around the British Isles in the last week.  Thirteen species and more than 500 sightings have been reported, and sightings continue to stream in.

National Whale and Dolphin Watch 2018 volunteer observers looking out for whales and dolphins at Eyemouth Fort, Scotland.

Photo credit: St Abbs & Eyemouth Voluntary Marine Reserve.

“This looks like being the best National Whale & Dolphin Watch event of the last two decades”, reported Dr Chiara Giulia Bertulli, organiser of this year’s national event for the UK national research charity, Sea Watch Foundation.

The 2018 National Whale and Dolphin Watch event involving thousands of volunteers from all around the British Isles, conducted between 28th July and 5nd August, has revealed striking biodiversity of Britain’s Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises.

This summer has seen a good number of humpback whale sightings all around the UK, with individuals popping up this last week in the North Sea off the Aberdeenshire coast and off Flamborough Head in Yorkshire. This species is making a noticeable come-back after many decades of exploitation in the North Atlantic.

“However, the most extraordinary sighting from this year’s Watch week”, adds Chiara, “was surely the Sowerby’s beaked whale which live stranded in the shallow waters of Belhaven in East Lothian, Scotland, on July 29th. This year also saw the addition of the striped dolphin, which in Britain and Ireland, is very rare, seen occasionally off the Atlantic coasts mainly in the south-west of Ireland. This species of warm temperate seas came to the shore at Pendine in South Wales on July 31st.”

 

Research identifies all the different ways the sea supports human wellbeing - University of Liverpool

A study led by the University of Liverpool that catalogued all of the links between marine biodiversity and the different ways we rely on the sea found more than 30 ways it supports well-being including providing a source of nutrition, supplying raw materials and supporting recreational activities.

A team of researchers explored the different ways that European seas including North East Atlantic Ocean, the Mediterranean Sea, the Baltic Sea and the Black Sea support and link to human wellbeing.

It is known that marine biodiversity supports human wellbeing in many ways and that people benefit from links between the flora and fauna of the sea and the ‘ecosystem services’. However, such an extensive catalogue of the links between marine ecosystems and human wellbeing has not previously existed.

The study found 31 different ecosystem services including providing a source of nutrition through supply of seafood, providing raw materials, for example marine plants used in cosmetics, producing oxygen (the sea is estimated to produce half of the oxygen we breathe), providing natural flood defences and also providing opportunities for recreation, artistic inspiration and enhancement of spiritual wellbeing.

Some of these, like seafood, have significant economic value and others enrich our lives in other essential and non-essential ways.

Read the paper: ‘Linking marine ecosystems with the services they supply: what are the relevant service providing units?’ is published in the journal Ecological Applications and can be found here.

 

Climate

Forests crucial for limiting climate change to 1.5 degrees - University of Exeter

Trying to tackle climate change by replacing forests with crops for bioenergy power stations that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) could instead increase the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere, scientists say.

Using vast areas of land for biomass crops may be counterproductive (image: University of Exeter)Biomass Energy with Carbon Capture and Storage (BECCS) power stations are designed to produce energy and store the resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) in bedrock deep underground.

Using vast areas of land for biomass crops may be counterproductive (image: University of Exeter)

But a study led by the University of Exeter suggests that converting large land areas to growing crops as biomass for BECCS would release so much CO2 that protecting and regenerating forests is a better option in many places.

“The vast majority of current IPCC scenarios for how we can limit global warming to less than 2°C include BECCS,” said lead author Dr Anna Harper, from the University of Exeter. “But the land required to grow biomass in these scenarios would be twice the size of India”.

This motivated the research team to look at the wider consequences of such a radical change in global land use. The researchers used a cutting-edge computer model of global vegetation and soil and presented it with scenarios of land-use change consistent with stabilising the climate at less than 1.5oC and 2oC of global warming. The results warn that using BECCS on such a large scale could lead to a net increase of carbon in the atmosphere, especially where the crops are assumed to replace existing forests. Co-author Dr Tom Powell, from the University of Exeter, explained: “In some places BECCS will be effective, but we’ve found that in many places protecting or regenerating forests is much more sensible.”

How well BECCS works depends on factors such as the choice of biomass, the fate of initial above-ground biomass and the fossil-fuel emissions offset in the energy system – so future improvements could make it a better option.

 

Land Management

£6 million to explore impact of hazardous chemicals on UK ecosystems - NERC

NERC has awarded £6 million to investigate the effects that potentially hazardous chemicals used by humans are having on UK habitats and wildlife.

(image: NERC)A workshop co-hosted by NERC, including representatives from government, regulation and industry, concluded that vital research needs to be done to understand the impact that new chemicals and combinations of chemicals are having on our ecosystems, and the animals and plants that depend on them.

(image: NERC)

With new chemicals constantly being used in agriculture, industry and everyday life, this research not only hopes to uncover unforeseen effects, but also to devise a new way for testing these impacts that can be applied to all types of ecosystems found in freshwater, at sea and on land. The current standard method of testing determines how toxic individual chemicals are but is unable to look at the combined effects of a mixture of chemicals, which can be quite a different picture.

NERC Associate Director of Research Ned Garnett said: “Healthy and productive terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems are vital to the economy and wellbeing of the UK. They play a key role in areas such as food production, providing clean water, absorbing carbon from the atmosphere and supporting sustainable fish stocks, as well as supporting our wildlife. This research will provide new evidence on how chemicals used in farming, industry and everyday life are impacting on these environments.”

 

Fresh insight into invasive plant that blights UK rivers – University of Stirling

New research into the behaviour of an invasive plant seen on riverbanks across the UK could help improve the management of the problem, experts have found.

The University of Stirling study provides clues as to why the abundance of Himalayan balsam – which has an adverse impact on native plants and river habitats – varies dramatically from place to place.

The work could help mitigate the impact of the pink-flowered plant, which outcompetes native species, causes shading and reduces the stability of riverbanks, enabling silt to enter the water.

Dr Zarah Pattison, of the Faculty of Natural Sciences, led the research, published in Ecosystems.

She said: “Our research has found that Himalayan balsam dislikes overly moist conditions, unlike the native plants – such as nettles, butterbur and canary grass – which dominate our lowland riverbanks. It prefers drier, steeper riverbanks where it can compete more effectively with the native plants. This knowledge offers a gateway to managing Himalayan balsam indirectly, by manipulating conditions on riverbanks.”

River engineering often involves straightening and over-deepening rivers and, combined with the abstraction of water, this leads to drier riverbanks during the summer, benefitting Himalayan balsam growth. This effect of riverbank drying may also be exacerbated with future climate change and drought conditions, as seen this summer across the UK.

In contrast, the restoration of rivers often results in gently sloped banks, meaning water is retained and riverbanks are therefore moister, favouring native species.

The authors also found that riverbanks with a large abundance of native plants are more likely to resist invasion by Himalayan balsam.

 

Greater species diversity boosts meadows’ resistance to parasitic invaders, university ecologists find – Manchester Metropolitan University

Research findings may influence land management policy of grasslands

Yellow rattles from the Manchester Metropolitan University study into genetic and species diversity in plants (Manchester Metropolitan University)Yellow rattles from the Manchester Metropolitan University study into genetic and species diversity in plants (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Grasslands enjoying a wider biodiversity have more resilience against parasitic plants, university researchers have found, in a study that could have important ramifications for active land management and conservation.

The Manchester Metropolitan University-led team explored how the survival and spread of the common parasite yellow rattle (Rhinanthus minor) was affected by the species diversity of its host plants - a controlled mix of grasses, legumes and forbs reflecting those typically found in Britain’s hay meadows – and by genetic diversity among the yellow rattle plants themselves.

The study, co-authored by lead academic Dr Jennifer Rowntree, Senior Lecturer in Ecological Genetics and Applied Conservation at Manchester Metropolitan University, and PhD student Hayley Craig of the University of Manchester, was published online today (Tuesday 21 August) in the Journal of Ecology.

Its findings may influence how landowners, conservationists and farmers manage their grasslands to promote parasitic plants, which leads to greater biodiversity in the long term, or reduce or eliminate them, according to land management needs.

Access the paper: Rowntree, J. K. & Craig, H. (2018) The contrasting roles of host species diversity and parasite population genetic diversity in the infection dynamics of a keystone parasitic plant. Journal of Ecology. doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13050

  

Scientific Publications

Moss, J. L., Doick, K. J., Smith, S. & Shahrestan, M. (2018) Influence of evaporative cooling by urban forests on cooling demand in cities. Urban Forestry & Urban Greening. DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2018.07.023

 

Hill, L., Hemery, G., Hector, A. & Brown, N. (2018) Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain. Journal of Applied Ecology DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.13255

 

Andrew Speak, Francisco J. Escobedo, Alessio Russo, Stefan Zerbe, An ecosystem service-disservice ratio: Using composite indicators to assess the net benefits of urban trees, Ecological Indicators, Volume 95, Part 1, 2018, Pages 544-553, DOI: 10.1016/j.ecolind.2018.07.048.

 

Barré, K., Le Viol, I., Bas, Y., Julliard, R. & Kerbiriou, C. (2018) Estimating habitat loss due to wind turbine avoidance by bats: Implications for European siting guidance. Biological Conservation doi: 10.1016/j.biocon.2018.07.011

 

Chavez VA, Gilligan CA, van den Bosch F. Variability in commercial demand for tree saplings affects the probability of introducing exotic forest diseases. J Appl Ecol. doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13242

 

Pessarrodona A, Foggo A, Smale DA. Can ecosystem functioning be maintained despite climate driven shifts in species composition? Insights from novel marine forests. J Ecol. 2018;00:1–14. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13053

 

Stefanie L. Becker, Gregor von der Wall, Tracing regime influence on urban community gardening: how resource dependence causes barriers to garden longer term sustainability, Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, 2018, ISSN 1618-8667, DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2018.08.003

 

Schrieber, K. , Schweiger, R. , Kröner, L. and Müller, C. (2018), Inbreeding diminishes herbivore-induced metabolic responses in native and invasive plant populations. J Ecol. Accepted Author Manuscript. . doi:10.1111/1365-2745.13068

 

Lucie M. Bland, Kate E. Watermeyer, David A. Keith, Emily Nicholson, Tracey J. Regan, Lynne J. Shannon, Assessing risks to marine ecosystems with indicators, ecosystem models and experts, Biological Conservation, Volume 227,2018, Pages 19-28, ISSN 0006-3207, DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2018.08.019. 

 

Willoughby, J. R. and Christie, M. R. (2018), Long-term demographic and genetic effects of releasing captive‐born individuals into the wild. Conservation Biology. Accepted Author Manuscript. . doi:10.1111/cobi.13217

 

Piotr Sikorski, Marzena Wińska-Krysiak, Jarosław Chormański, Kinga Krauze, Katarzyna Kubacka, Daria Sikorska, Low-maintenance green tram tracks as a socially acceptable solution to greening a city, Urban Forestry & Urban Greening, ISSN 1618-8667, DOI: 10.1016/j.ufug.2018.08.017.

 

Hart A G, Carpenter W S, Hlustik-Smith E, Reed M, Goodenough A E. Testing the potential of Twitter mining methods for data acquisition: Evaluating novel opportunities for ecological research in multiple taxa. Methods Ecol Evol. 2018;00:1–12. https://doi.org/10.1111/2041-210X.13063  

 

Hill L, Hemery G, Hector A, Brown N. Maintaining ecosystem properties after loss of ash in Great Britain. J Appl Ecol. 2018;00:1–12. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.13255

 

Ülo Väli, Jaanus Elts & Hannes Pehlak (2018) Are common bird monitoring schemes and opportunistic observations appropriate for estimating raptor trends?, Bird Study, DOI: 10.1080/00063657.2018.1506422

 

How to get your news to us:

Send your press releases to newsdesk@countryside-jobs.com or email a link to items on your website.

If it's time sensitive we can embargo the details to a specific date, let us know when you'd like it to be published. 

 


Training.

Browse the Training Directory online here for short courses (up to 10 days long), or here for longer courses, distance learning and centres and providers

The Directory includes a wide range of courses providing certification in practical skills such as chainsaw use, need to learn how to identify dragonflies, or want to find out the best way to get the community involved in your project then this is the section to read.    We include details of many professional courses in the online short courses pages. There are also sections for longer courses, training centres and other events (eg conferences).

Search for your next CPD course here.

 

Logo: European Union Regional Development FundUniversity of Cumbria

MSc Ecosystem Services Evaluation

Funding for MSc Research Projects 

Three exciting and practical MSc environmental research projects. 

You will study in Ambleside, in the Lake District National Park – now a UNESCO World Heritage Site – surrounded by unique ecosystems and landscapes, so you will literally have an outdoor laboratory in which to research ecosystems and their values on your doorstep. 

So with us you can live, study and research in Cumbria’s stunning landscape with its natural rivers and lakes, home to white-clawed cray fish, arctic char, red squirrels high-brown fritillary butterflies, migrating dolphins and basking sharks. 

Benefits

The MSc research study will be partly funded by the European Regional Development Fund Eco-Innovation Cumbria project led by the University of Cumbria. Benefits include:

   ●   A tax free stipend of £4666    ●   Fees subsidised by industry sponsor £2,500     ●   Project travel expenses.    ●   Become part of a cohort of student researchers working on industry-led projects in Eco Innovation. 

MSc Research Projects: 

Landscape Character Assessment Monitoring Techniques Appraisal and Ground Truthing in the Lake District National Park

The University of Cumbria has funding to support research work by Friends of The Lake District. This is a practical MSc research project to set up a monitoring framework which can identify changes to the landscape of the Lake District National Park using an existing Landscape Character Assessment as the baseline.

Friends of the Lake District  

Preventing the Spread of Invasive Non-Native Species by Identifying the Pathways of Introduction.

A practical MSc Project that could help shape the health of Lake District and its lakes. The University of Cumbria has funding to support research work by South Cumbria Rivers Trust, a professional team dedicated to conserving fresh water habitats and local wildlife.

South Cumbria Rivers Trust 

Model the life-cycle impact of a new product, the portable ecosystem concept.

The University of Cumbria has funding to support research work by Portable Ecosystems Ltd. A practical MSc research project to model the life-cycle impact of the portable ecosystem concept and establish a sustainability impact assessment that will enable the company to identify, assess and quantify the environmental credentials of the portable ecosystem concept.

Portable Ecosystems Ltd – This is a new company with a novel product concept. The product is subject to a patent application so there is no public disclosure at this stage.Logo: University of Cumbria 

MSc Course - Ecosystem Services Evaluation 

For more information and to apply Click here

Refer: Funded Masters projects 

 


Calendar of short courses and professional events happening in: November

 

Events

01/11/2018   Invasion Science: Connecting research, management and policy   2 Day

Charles Darwin House, London, BES Invasion Science Group. Contact: https://c-js.info/2nGKBqv

03/11/2018   Scottish Botanists' Conference   1 Day

Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, Botanical Society of Britain & Ireland. Contact: jim.mcintosh@bsbi.org https://c-js.info/2MxhoIX

06/11/2018   National Tree Officers Conference 2018   1 Day

Oakengates Theatre, Telford, Institute of Chartered Foresters. Contact: https://c-js.info/2KIsrlC

07/11/2018   Talking Plants: How to Communicate Plant Science   3 Day

Cambridge University Botanic Garden , Botanic Gardens Education Network. Contact: 07341131965 info@bgen.org.uk https://c-js.info/2LBoTOT

bgen Conference, hosted by Cambridge University’s Botanic Garden and Sainsbury Laboratory, focusses on communicating plant science and research to a wide range of audiences. Join plant scientists from the University and plant science communicators and educators from across the UK for three days of ‘Talking Plants’.

09/11/2018   2018 ICF Midlands: Planning and Development in Existing Woodland    1 Day

The Core at Corby Cube, Institute of Chartered Foresters. Contact: https://c-js.info/2u3HhZy

13/11/2018   Valuing Nature Annual Conference 2018   2 Day

National Museum Cardiff, Wale, Valuing Nature. Contact: info@valuing-nature.net https://c-js.info/2vTD8rV

16/11/2018   PTES Dormouse Mitigation Conference   1 Day

Natural History Museum, People's Trust for Endangered Species. Contact: 020 7498 4533 Ian.white@ptes.org https://c-js.info/22BWhYW

The Dormouse Mitigation Conference is a must for anyone involved in dormouse surveying, licencing and mitigation. You will get updates on survey techniques, how to plan mitigation strategies and updates to licensing legislation.

17/11/2018   Scottish Bat Workers Conference 2017   1 Day

Battleby Conference Centre, Redgorton, Perth PH1 3EW , Bat Conservation Trust. Contact: http://c-js.info/2w0EHXh

This is a one day conference open to anyone with an interest in bats. It will be held at the Battleby Conference centre near Perth. Attending the conference is a great way to update your bat knowledge, practical skills and to network, through the varied programme of talks and workshops.

20/11/2018   Rewilding Perspectives and Applications Conference 2018   1 Day

Royal Agricultural University, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 6JS, Royal Agricultural University and Cirencester Sixth Form College. Contact: https://c-js.info/2LMNx3x

20/11/2018   CIEEM Autumn Conference 2018 Advances in Ecological Restoration and Habitat Creation   2 Day

Glasgow Marriott Hotel, 500 Argyle Street, Glasgow, G3 8RR, CIEEM. Contact: https://c-js.info/2N5GWxl

The two-day Autumn conference will bring together policy makers, land owners and practitioners to review current thinking in ecological restoration and habitat creation. Drawing on examples from a wide range of ecosystems, the conference sessions will examine the different stages of the ecological restoration and habitat creation process from the policy and legislative context through to post-implementation monitoring.

20/11/2018   CMA Annual Conference - Engaging Communities, Enhancing Lives   2 Day

YHA London Lee Valley Hostel, Countryside Management Association. Contact: admin@countrysidemanagement.org.uk https://c-js.info/2nlMFUN

21/11/2018   National Biodiversity Network (NBN) Conference 2018   2 Day

Albert Hall, Nottingham, The National Biodiversity Network. Contact: https://c-js.info/2LjaIkN

The theme of this two day Conference is “The NBN in a changing climate”. There will be over 20 presentations, including keynotes and speed talks and an afternoon of “Knowledge Exchange” sessions. The UK Awards for Biological Recording and Information Sharing will also be presented, on the evening of 21 November.

22/11/2018   Linking behaviour to populations and communities: how can behavioural ecology inform conservation?   2 Day

Huxley Lecture Theatre, Main Meeting Rooms, Zoological Society of London, Outer Circle, Regents Park, NW1 4RY, Zoological Society of London. Contact: jennifer.howes@zsl.org http://c-js.info/2xjjMfK

 

Access and Rights of Way

13/11/2018   Law and Practice   3 Day

Knuston Hall, Northants, IPROW. Contact: training@iprow.co.uk http://iprow.co.uk/training/law-and-practice/

Rights of way law and practice covering the definitive map, modification and public path orders, maintenance and enforcement provides the foundation for any rights of way officer or ranger.

 

Administrative and Office Skills

01/11/2018   Calculating and Using Biodiversity Units   1 Day

Canary Wharf, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/01112018000000CalculatingandUsingBiodiversityUnits.aspx

This course provides training on biodiversity unit calculations based on Defra's guidance. It is for individuals wishing to develop or enhance skills in undertaking and using biodiversity unit calculations.

06/11/2018   Management Training - London   1 Day

St. Luke's Community Centre, 90 Central St, EC1V 8AJ, London, Talk Action. Contact: 0207 324 4775 training@talkaction.org http://www.talkaction.org/training/introductiontomanagement/

A leadership and management training programme that offers new and soon-to-be managers the opportunity to build confidence, learn key skills, and explore a variety of management techniques.

06/11/2018   Preliminary Ecological Appriasal   2 Day

Exeter, Acorn Ecology Ltd. Contact: 01392 366512 training@acornecology.co.uk https://c-js.co.uk/2xSEjfq

Preliminary Ecological Appraisal (PEA) is an essential skill for any ecological consultant. This course will cover desk studies and data searches, identifying protected species and habitats (including field visits), discussion of further survey work required, wildlife legislation and how to write a report.

06/11/2018   Ecological Report Writing   1 Day

Swindon, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/06112018000000EcologicalReportWriting.aspx

A one-day course on how to produce good quality ecological reports, for species and habitat surveys and Preliminary Ecological Appraisals (PEAs), following CIEEM's 'Guidelines for Ecological Report Writing'.

13/11/2018   How to apply for a Natural England bat mitigation licence   2 Day

9C Mill Park Ind Est, White Cross Rd, Woodbury Salterton, Exeter EX5 1EL, Richard Green Ecology Ltd. Contact: 01395 239234 office@richardgreenecology.co.uk https://c-js.co.uk/2xTQqck

This advanced course will explain what information is required to apply for a bat mitigation licence and go through the process of completing all the relevant forms, including the necessary content, common mistakes and 'top tips' to avoid further information requests from Natural England. A reference will be provided to competent attendees.

13/11/2018   Effective Communication Skills   1 Day

Newcastle, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/13112018000000EffectiveCommunicationSkills.aspx

Do you want to communicate better at work with customers, contractors, suppliers, colleagues, managers and other professionals? If so, this one-day course is what you are looking for.

14/11/2018   Management Training - Edinburgh   1 Day

The Melting Pot, Talk Action. Contact: 02073244775 training@talkaction.org http://www.talkaction.org/

A leadership and management training programme that offers new and soon-to-be managers the opportunity to build confidence, learn key skills, and explore a variety of management techniques.

14/11/2018   Biodiversity and the Planning System   2 Day

Bradford-on-Avon, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/14112018000000BiodiversityandthePlanningSystem.aspx

This two day course is aimed at beginners, but will cover the full breadth of planning-related wildlife legislation and policy, including that related to protected sites, habitats, species and ecological networks. Delegates will learn how to produce policy-complaint reports to support planning applications.

15/11/2018   QGIS Intermediate Training   1 Day

Talgarth, South Wales, exeGeSIS SDM Ltd. Contact: 01874 713066 Carolbateman@esdm.co.uk http://www.esdm.co.uk/qgis-training-courses

Ideal for Environmental & Ecological Professionals

20/11/2018   Good practice stakeholder participation training, with a focus on the environment   3 Day

Brabourne, nr Ashford, Dialogue Matters. Contact: 01233 813875 training@dialoguematters.co.uk http://www.dialoguematters.co.uk

This in-depth, interactive training course will help you recognise the benefits and challenges of involving stakeholders in decisions about the environment; understand the principles and concepts of stakeholder participation; learn and practice practical facilitation skills and; learn how to design a participation process.

20/11/2018   QGIS Foundation Training   2 Day

Talgarth, South Wales, exeGeSIS SDM Ltd. Contact: 01874 713066 Carolbateman@esdm.co.uk http://www.esdm.co.uk/qgis-training-courses

Ideal for Environmental & Ecological Professionals

21/11/2018   Strategy Development for Wildlife Conservation   23/11/2018 Day

YHA York, YO30 6LP, WildTeam UK. Contact: Beth@wildteam.org.uk http://www.wildteam.org.uk/classroom

Identify and assess threats to wildlife; Create conceptual models that clearly show what is driving the current threats; Create theories of change based on a behaviour change approach; Develop a monitoring approach to help you keep track on your progress. 10% off if you book before 21st September 2018

22/11/2018   MapInfo Foundation Training   2 Day

Talgarth, South Wales, exeGeSIS SDM Ltd. Contact: 01874 713066 Carolbateman@esdm.co.uk http://www.esdm.co.uk/mapinfo-training-courses

Ideal for Environmental & Ecological Professionals

27/11/2018   Arc Foundation Training    2 Day

Talgarth, South Wales, exeGeSIS SDM Ltd. Contact: 01874 713066 Carolbateman@esdm.co.uk http://www.esdm.co.uk/arcgis-courses

Ideal for Environmental & Ecological Professionals

29/11/2018   BS42020 Biodiversity: Code of Practice for Planning and Development   1 Day

Reading, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/29112018000000BS42020BiodiversityCodeofPracticeforPlanningandDevelopment.aspx

With sessions led by Mike Oxford, Chair of BSI's Technical Committee on Biodiversity and principal author for BS42020, the course will focus on how to achieve effective ecological input at all five stages of the planning and development process.

 

Community Engagement and Environmental Education

03/11/2018   Forest School Level 2 Assistant Course   5 Day

Lawshall, Bury St Edmunds, Green Light Trust. Contact: 01284 830829 lindsay@greenlighttrust.org http://www.greenlighttrust.org/we-help-schools-colleges/forest-schools

Designed for individuals who wish to assist a Level 3 Forest School Leader at Forest School.

07/11/2018   Train the Trainer for Ecologists   1 Day

Edinburgh, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/07112018000000TraintheTrainerforEcologists.aspx

This unique two-day course is specially designed for ecologists and environmental professionals and covers field as well as classroom tuition. The aim is for participants to develop their training skills towards designing and delivering courses to a professional standard of tuition.

13/11/2018   Facilitation Training - Edinburgh   1 Day

Grassmarket Community Project, Talk Action. Contact: 02073244775 training@talkaction.org http://www.talkaction.org/training/facilitation-scotland/

A unique day of interactive and participatory learning to build your skills and confidence as a facilitator, meeting organiser or workshop leader. 

14/11/2018   Effective Workplace Mentoring   1 Day

Newcastle, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/14112018000000EffectiveWorkplaceMentoring.aspx

This one day course will take you through the end to end process of effective mentoring. From learning what mentoring is and isn't through to examining tools and techniques to get the best from your mentee.  

15/11/2018   Volunteer Management Training - Edinburgh   1 Day

The Melting Pot, Talk Action. Contact: 02073244775 training@talkaction.org http://The Melting Pot

Helping volunteers love you – your organisation and the role they play. Learn how to work with volunteers in new and exciting ways that help build your organisation, social enterprise or voluntary group.

26/11/2018   Forest School Level 3 Training (NOCN Level 3 Certificate in Forest School Leadership (QCF)   10 Day

Scotswood Natural Community Garden, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE15 6TT, Scotswood Natural Community Garden. Contact: harriet@sncg.org.uk http://www.sncg.org.uk

 

Countryside Management Techniques

10/11/2018   Practical Woodland Management   2 Day

Green Wood Centre, Coalbrookdale, TF8 7DR, Small Woods Association. Contact: 01952 432769 richardthomason@smallwoods.org.uk http://smallwoods.org.uk/course/practical-woodland-management/

This course will provide the latest good practice guidelines with top tips and techniques established over many years including: Tree selection and thinning - which tree to keep and the reasons why; High pruning to improve timber quality; Tree planting; Safe moving of timber and extraction; Dealing with brash; Ride management.

 

First Aid, Risk Assessment and other Health & Safety Related Courses

01/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Aviemore Tennis Club, Aviemore with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

05/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid for Forest Schools and Outdoor Woodland Learning Practitioners   2 Days at Bonaly Outdoor Centre, Edinburgh with First Aid Training Co-operative.

This 16 hour Forest School Outdoor First Aid course course syllabus is totally integrated with the Forest School ethos and rationale. The course covers dealing with child and adult accidents and incidents. Child CPR and child illness (including asthma, epilepsy and anaphylaxis) are covered.

Above two courses contact: 03334330731 courses@firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk http://www.firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk

07/11/2018   REC Outdoor First Aid Course Level 2   2 Day

Nower Wood, Mill Way, leatherhead KT22 8QA, Surrey Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01372379523 adult.learning@surreywt.org.uk https://www.surreywildlifetrust.org/events/2018-11-07-outdoor-1st-aid-rec-level-2

Become a certified outdoor first aider by attending this two-day course.

08/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Lochore Meadows Country Park, Fife with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

09/11/2018   Emergency First Aid at Work + Forestry   1 Day at Inverness with First Aid Training Co-operative.

EFAW+F - 7 hours - Forestry Commission requires that all on site contractors, hauliers, ecologists have suitable first aid cover to deal with accidents and incidents that may occur whilst they are undertaking their work. These are first aid courses +F

Above two courses contact: 03334330731 courses@firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk http://www.firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk

15/11/2018   RSPH Level 2 Award in Pest Management   6 Days with Pest Solution

This qualification provides the essential knowledge relating to the training of pest control operatives. It is aimed at both existing technicians and individuals looking to enter the field of pest control. The course covers Vertebrates and Invertebrates, as well as Health, Safety and Legal Aspects of Pest Management.

15/11/2018   RSPH Level 2 Certificate in Pest Management   6 Days with Pest Solution

This qualification provides the knowledge relating to the training of pest control operatives and is aimed at both existing technicians and individuals looking to enter the field. The course covers both theory and practical aspects of Vertebrates and Invertebrates, as well as Health, Safety and Legal Aspects of Pest Management.

Above two courses at Bury St Edmunds, Pest Solution. Contact: 01284 766362 info@pestsolution.co.uk http://www.pestcontroltraining.co

15/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Windermere, Lake District with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

17/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Transition Extreme, Aberdeen with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

17/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Perthshire Scout Hall, Perth with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

21/11/2018   Emergency First Aid at Work + Forestry   1 Day at EICA, RATHO, Edinburgh with First Aid Training Co-operative.

EFAW+F - 7 hours - Forestry Commission requires that all on site contractors, hauliers, ecologists have suitable first aid cover to deal with accidents and incidents that may occur whilst they are undertaking their work. These are first aid courses +F

22/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at EICA, RATHO, Edinburgh, with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

24/11/2018   Outdoor First Aid 2 Days   2 Days at Newcastle upon Tyne with First Aid Training Co-operative.

Outdoor First Aid (16 hours) is designed rangers, ecologists, surveyors or foresters those who work in remote locations to deal with incidents in places the emergency services won't arrive in 15 minutes! Also covers NGB awards for outdoor instructors.

For First Aid Training Co-operative contact: 03334330731 courses@firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk http://www.firstaidtrainingcooperative.co.uk

 

Identification and Field Survey Skills - Herpetology, Fish and Invertebrates

11/11/2018   Identification of Solitary Wasps (family Crabronidae) with Microscopes   1 Day

FSC Preston Montford, Shropshire, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/individuals-and-families/courses/2018/ho/identification-of-solitary-wasps-(family-crabronidae-)-with-microscopes-(pm-11th-september).aspx

This course will introduce you to Crabronid wasps and their families. Using pinned specimens and microscopes, you will learn how to key out these wasps to genus and, where possible, species

13/11/2018   Invertebrate Identification for Biotic Assessment (including examination)   3 Day

FBA Windermere, Cumbria, Freshwater Biological Association (FBA). Contact: 01539 442468 events@fba.org.uk http://www.fba.org.uk/courses

This three day course covers the identification of the freshwater macroinvertebrate families used for biotic assessment (BMWP, WHPT, LIFE and PSI). It is aimed at professionals with experience of identification, who wish to consolidate their knowledge.

24/11/2018   Seahorse Survey Course   2 Day

Marine Conservation Society HQ Ross-on-Wye, The Seahorse Trust. Contact: seahorsesurveycourse@aol.co.uk https://www.theseahorsetrust.org/

The course covers a range of topics including seahorse biology, ecology, conservation and survey methods with a view that once completing the course, you will be well informed and enthused to further support seahorse conservation projects here in the U.K. and abroad.

28/11/2018   Pseudoscorpion Identification Workshop   1 Day

FSC Bishops Wood, Worcs, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/individuals-and-families/courses/2018/ho/pseudoscorpion-identification-workshop-(bw-28th-november).aspx

This one-day workshop is designed for people who have already begun learning about, identifying and recording pseudoscorpions but who would like some additional support and the chance to practice their pseudoscorpion ID alongside like-minded people.

 

Identification and Field Survey Skills - Mammals

03/11/2018   Kent Mammal Tracks and Signs NEW   1 Day

Wildwood Trust, Herne, Kent Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01622 662012 studydays@kentwildlife.org.uk http://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/

Learn about which mammals might be living in your area by identifying the signs (including tracks, droppings and feeding remains) they may have left behind. The course includes a tour of the park, a ‘Who nibbled this nut?' practical and a poo quiz to test your newfound knowledge!

08/11/2018   Assessing Trees for Bats   1 Day

Abinger Common, Surrey, Species Recovery Trust. Contact: 01722 322539 bookings@speciesrecoverytrust.org.uk http://www.speciesrecoverytrust.org.uk

A one day course giving participants knowledge of legislation relating to bat roosts, a better understanding of tree health and safety surveys and an opportunity to view and survey a range of trees on site

08/11/2018   Ground Level Tree Assessments for Bats   1 Day

Wotton-under-Edge, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/08112018000000GroundLevelTreeAssessmentsforBats.aspx

This one day training event will provide participants with the knowledge and skills required to undertake informed ground level assessment of trees for roosting bats.

12/11/2018   Mammal Monitoring   1 Day

Cumbernauld, TCV Scotland. Contact: 01786 476170 Scotland-training@tcv.org.uk http://c-js.co.uk/2ysVU9j

Basic introduction to monitoring common mammals as an engagement tool. Covering reading tracks, trails and signs, camera trapping, surveying and recording.

28/11/2018   Water Vole Live Trapping, Handling, Practical Care and Re-establishment   2 Day

Lifton, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/28112018000000WaterVoleLiveTrappingHandlingPracticalCareandReestablishment.aspx

This advanced course aims to familiarise experienced practitioners with the practical elements of water vole trapping and considerations for maintaining water voles in captivity. Delegates will have opportunities to handle water voles of different ages and sexes, consider the requirements pertinent to the effective re-establishment of water vole populations and techniques to assist with successful restoration.

 

Identification and Field Survey Skills - Ornithology

02/11/2018   Birds of the White Cliffs   1 Day

Samphire Hoe, Kent Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01622 662012 studydays@kentwildlife.org.uk http://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/

Observe and learn about the special birds of the chalk cliffs at this unique coastal site.

05/11/2018   Avian Egg Incubation Workshop    4 Day

Jersey, Durrell Conservation Academy. Contact: http://wildlife.durrell.org/training/courses/avian-egg-incubation-workshop-/

This 5 day workshop is aimed at curators, keepers, veterinarians, serious private breeders and field biologists involved in managing breeding birds, both in captivity and in the wild.  Whether new to egg incubation or experienced with managing eggs, participants gain a broad range of skills necessary to ensure optimal hatchability both in the incubator and in the nest.

 

Identification and Field Survey Skills - Plants and Habitats

03/11/2018   Trees in Autumn/early winter   1 Day at Tyland Barn

Identification by the buds, twigs, bark, shape and size. Challenging but possible. Classroom and field studies

03/11/2018   Identification of Fungi III   1 Day at Emmetts, Ide Hill,

Helpful tips on identification of larger fungi and their habitats in the field.

Above two courses with Kent Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01622 662012 studydays@kentwildlife.org.uk http://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/

05/11/2018   Phase 1 Habitat Survey   1 Day

Exeter, Acorn Ecology Ltd. Contact: 01392 366512 training@acornecology.co.uk https://c-js.co.uk/2xSEjfq

An introductory level course, relevant to both consultancy and conservation. Our day long course includes: introduction and background to Phase 1 habitat surveys, field experience of identifying and recording habitats, basic identification of dominant plant species and preparation of habitat maps in the classroom.

06/11/2018   Invasive Non Native Species Awareness Training (INNS)    1 Day

Swansea, Jo Mullett, Knotweed Control. Contact: 07790505232 knotweedcontrol@gmail.com http://www.knotweedcontrolwales.co.uk

INNS are one of the biggest threats to biodiversity and are being recognised as causing wider environmental, social and economic problems. The course will explore; - Basic ID features - Why they are successful - Associated problems/ benefits - Legislation - Action - Recording - Horizon scanning £50 per person

06/11/2018   World of Waxcaps Fungi Identificattion   1 Day

The Kingcombe Centre, Dorset Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01300 320684 kingcombe@dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk http://www.kingcombe.org

The Kingcombe Meadows nature reserve is especially noted for it's population of waxcaps. Join local expert, Bryan Edwards, on this day of discovery.

07/11/2018   Floodplain Meadows - monitoring, and factors affecting plant communities   1 Day

Glastonbury, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/07112018000000FloodplainMeadowsmonitoringandfactorsaffectingplantcommunities.aspx

The course will cover factors affecting floodplain meadow plant communities and how communities respond to these, such as hydrology and flooding, soils and nutrient loading; monitoring techniques for environmental factors including dipwells; an overview of habitat management (grassland, water management); an overview of the recent reclassification of floodplain plant communities.

08/11/2018   An Introduction to Fungi   1 Day

Kirdford, West Sussex, Sussex Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01273 497544 michaelblencowe@sussexwt.org.uk https://sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/whats-on/2018-11-08-an-introduction-to-fungi-081118

After a morning session in Kirdford village hall looking at the anatomy of fungi, the major fungi groups, how to find them and the limits of what you can do without a high-powered microscope we will then move into the ancient woodland of Ebernoe Common where over a 1000 species of fungi have been found including many rare and unusual species. Discount for members.

09/11/2018   Getting to Know Conifers   2 Day

FSC Juniper Hall, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/naturalhistory

Winter provides a wonderful opportunity to focus our attention on the conifers, most of which are evergreen and still bear cones. The British flora is remarkably poor in diversity of native conifers but many introduced species form a major feature in our landscape. This course includes a visit to Bedgebury Pinetum in Kent which has a fine collection of this magnificent group of trees. *MMU

09/11/2018   Tips & Tricks for Identifying Annex 1 Habitat in Ireland   1 Day

Rochestown, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/09112018000000TricksandTipsforIdentifyingsomeAnnex1HabitatsinIreland.aspx

This one day course, led by Robert Fennelly, leads delegates through the recent and emerging guides to criteria for some Annex 1 habitats in Ireland and tips to increase confidence in field ID of Annex 1 indicator species. Habitats covered include grassland and peatland as well as some macrophyte and petrifying spring habitats.

10/11/2018   The Wonderful World of Trees Pt.2   2 Day

Green Wood Centre, Coalbrookdale, TF8 7DR, Small Woods Association. Contact: 01952 432769 judithadams@smallwoods.org.uk http://smallwoods.org.uk/course/wonderful-world-of-trees-pt-2/

A Course delivered over two weekends taking a close look at Tree Growth, Development and Structure, how Trees Function, how they Communicate, their Close Associations and their Strategies for Survival and Longevity. Day 1. Aspects of Tree Identification and Tree Naming, Soils. Day 2. Plant and Tree Strategies for Survival.

12/11/2018   Phase 1 Habitat Survey    2 Day

Birnam, CIEEM. Contact: 01962 868626 enquiries@cieem.net http://events.cieem.net/Events/EventPages/12112018000000Phase1HabitatSurvey.aspx

Aimed at consultants, botanists and ecologists involved in the conservation, surveying and classification of habitats in Scotland. This course is designed as an introduction to identify the characteristics of main Phase 1 habitats. This will involve excursions to a range of habitats within the JNCC Phase 1 habitat survey system.

16/11/2018   Axe Workshop & Tree Interpretation   3 Day

Derbyshire - Haddon Hall Estate, Woodland Ways Bushcraft & Survival. Contact: 01234 351006 info@woodland-ways.co.uk http://c-js.co.uk/2pvaWs4

At Woodland Ways we offer one of the most comprehensive ranges of Wilderness Bushcraft and Survival courses available, covering everything from the basics up to advanced skills and instructor training.

17/11/2018   Light Microscopy for Botanists @ The Green Centre   1 Day

FSC Epping Forest, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/naturalhistory

This one-day, hands-on course is intended to enable participants to get the best out of microscope observation or for measurement, aimed at those wanting to improve their microscope skill-set. Each participant will have access to stereozoom-dissecting and high-power compound microscopes.

17/11/2018   Lichens   1 Day at Tyland Barn

Make a start on identifying these notoriously difficult yet intriguing, beautiful and environmentally sensitive plants.

18/11/2018   Woodland Mosses for Beginners   1 Day at Tyland Barn

Learn more about the complex lives and identification of mosses

Above two courses with Kent Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01622 662012 studydays@kentwildlife.org.uk http://www.kentwildlifetrust.org.uk/

18/11/2018   Shropshire's Landscape   1 Day

Preston Montford Field Centre, Growing Confidence Project, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852040 gc@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/gc

Enjoy a day out exploring the geology, geography and ecology of the Shropshire landscape. Suitable for ages 15-25.

23/11/2018   Trees and Tree Identification: The Challenge of Early Winter   3 Day

FSC Flatford Mill, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/naturalhistory

This is an irresistible time to turn our attention to trees. At this time the broad-leaved trees have just lost their blaze of colour and the conifers stand out in majestic contrast. But by late November we can no longer rely solely on the foliage and fruits, we must now look to twig formation and winter buds to help us identify these important members of our natural heritage. This course is suitable for beginners and all those who love trees. No previous knowledge will be assumed.

27/11/2018   Catchment Hydrology. Water Management using the Integrated Hydrological Modelling System, IHMS   3 Day

Wallingford, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Contact: 01491 69 2225 ingsch@ceh.ac.uk http://www.ceh.ac.uk/training/catchment-hydrology

The course is aimed at Hydrologists; catchment managers; practitioners, policy makers, business & researchers . It covers the Water cycle within the catchment, Impact of climate and land use changes & more.

 

Photography

03/11/2018   Photography in Epping Forest in Autumn   1 Day

FSC Epping Forest, Field Studies Council. Contact: 01743 852100 enquiries@field-studies-council.org http://www.field-studies-council.org/arts

Learn how to capture the glorious autumn colours of Epping Forest with your camera on this very user-friendly photography course and achieve interesting photographs of the season's woodland flora and fauna. Demystify your camera and find out how to take good close-up pictures using different angles.

10/11/2018   Improving Your Nature Photography   2 Day

Woods Mill, Henfield, West Sussex, Sussex Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01273 497544 michaelblencowe@sussexwt.org.uk https://sussexwildlifetrust.org.uk/whats-on/2018-11-10-improving-your-nature-photography-10-111118-two-day-course

This course will teach you how to develop and push your skills in wildlife photography. This two day course is a continuation for those who have already attended our 'Beginning Nature Photography' course and it is required that you attend this previous course before booking on this one. Not suitable for users of SLR film, point and shoot or hybrid cameras. Discount for members.

10/11/2018   Wildlife Photography in the Autumn   0.5 Day

Attenborough Nature Reserve, Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust. Contact: 0115 972 1777 enquiries@attenboroughnaturecentre.co.uk https://c-js.co.uk/2KBu9WK

Join professional photographer Iain McMillan for a morning of wildlife photography around the reserve. Learn how to get the best from your own equipment and use Iain's extensive range of professional kit. 8-11am.

12/11/2018   Landscape Photography Workshop   3 Day

The Kingcombe Centre, Dorset Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01300 320684 kingcombe@dorsetwildlifetrust.org.uk http://www.kingcombe.org

Develop your skills in technique, composition and image processing on this workshop covering the land and coast of west Dorset. With award-winning photographer Mark Bauer.

24/11/2018   Photography Workshop: The Invisible World   1 Day

Nower Wood, Mill Way, leatherhead KT22 8QA, Surrey Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01372379523 adult.learning@surreywt.org.uk https://www.surreywildlifetrust.org/events/2018-11-24-photography-workshop-invisible-world

Experience the world of ultraviolet and infrared photography.

 

Practical Countryside Skills

03/11/2018   Coppice Restoration   2 Day

Wenlock Edge, Much Wenlock TF13 6LP, Small Woods Association. Contact: 01952 432769 richardthomason@smallwoods.org.uk http://smallwoods.org.uk/course/coppice-restoration-2/

This course will cover all aspects for restoring a neglected and over stood coppice woodland, including: Assessing the age and health of a coppice stool; Developing a coppice rotation; Felling and processing; Extraction; Understanding stool density; Layering and planting; Pest control; Monitoring; Coppicing for economic and wildlife benefit.

06/11/2018   PA6pp - Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment (ECOPLUGS) NPTC / City and Guilds    0.5 Day

Settle BD24 9DN, Lowe Maintenance Training . Contact: 01729 825132 info@lowe-maintenance.co.uk http://www.lowe-maintenance.co.uk

Half day training plus one day assessment on the safe use of ECOPLUGS, pre requisite is PA1

08/11/2018   Hedgetrimmer   1 Day

Plymouth, Lynher Training Ltd. Contact: 01822 832902 admin@lynher.com http://www.lynher.com

1 day for all users - practical assessment with short questions at end of course. Refresher training is recommended every 3 to 5 years

10/11/2018   Dry Stone Walling - Beginners   2 Day

Broadway Tower, Cotswolds Rural Skills. Contact: 01451 862000 ruralskills@cotswoldsaonb.org.uk http://www.cotswoldsruralskills.org.uk

On the beginners course you can expect to learn about: dismantling walls, stone sorting, laying foundations, building up of the wall, adding through stones and copping stones, dressing the stone, different types of stone, the necessary tools and how to use them and much more. On our courses you will be building a wall that will remain part of the Cotswolds landscape for the next 100-200 years!

17/11/2018   Introduction to Hedge Laying   2 Day

Green Wood Centre, Coalbrookdale, TF8 7DR, Small Woods Association. Contact: 01952 432769 richardthomason@smallwoods.org.uk http://smallwoods.org.uk/course/introduction-to-hedge-laying-3/

This is a practical course covering all aspects of hedge laying including: Identifying different hedge laying styles; Identifying suitable hedge species; Different stages of hedge laying, pleaching, stacking and binding; Laying multiple hedges of different sizes types and ages; Using and maintaining the different hand tools needed in hedge laying.

22/11/2018   Dry Stone Walling - Beginners   2 Day

Lodge Park, Cotswolds Rural Skills. Contact: 01451 862000 ruralskills@cotswoldsaonb.org.uk http://www.cotswoldsruralskills.org.uk

On the beginners course you can expect to learn about: dismantling walls, stone sorting, laying foundations, building up of the wall, adding through stones and copping stones, dressing the stone, different types of stone, the necessary tools and how to use them and much more. On our courses you will be building a wall that will remain part of the Cotswolds landscape for the next 100-200 years!

27/11/2018   Felling Trees   1 Day

Nower Wood, Mill Way, leatherhead KT22 8QA, Surrey Wildlife Trust. Contact: 01372379523 adult.learning@surreywt.org.uk https://www.surreywildlifetrust.org/events/2018-11-27-felling-trees

Learn how to safely fell small trees while exploring their biology and usefulness.

 

Practical Countryside Skills - Machinery

01/11/2018   Practical Vertebrate Trapping   1 Day

Bury St Edmunds, Pest Solution. Contact: 01284 766362 info@pestsolution.co.uk http://www.pestcontroltraining.co

This course is aimed at pest controllers who want to add vertebrate trapping to their service portfolio. The course covers both theory and practical aspects of trapping vertebrate pests, such as moles, rabbits, grey squirrels, pigeons, rats and mice.

05/11/2018   Aerial Tree Rigging (formally CS41) NPTC / City and Guilds   3 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

Three days training plus one day for assessment. Covering the rigging and dismantling of trees from a rope and harness. Pre requisites are tree climbing (CS38) and chainsaw (CS30 and CS31)

05/11/2018   PA1 - Principles of Safe Handling and Application of Pesticides NPTC / City and Guilds   1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

This is a pre requisite for other pesticide application units, assessment is through on online multiple choice exam. Grandfather Rights unit 1 can be run along side this course

06/11/2018   PA6inj - Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment (stem injection) NPTC / City and Guilds    0.5 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

Half day training plus one day assessment on the safe use of stem injection equipment for giant hogweed, japanese knotweed etc, pre requisite is PA1

07/11/2018   PA6aw - Safe Application of Pesticides Using Pedestrian Hand Held Equipment to or near water (knapsacks/lance from a tank) NPTC / City and Guilds    1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

This course is for people who use knapsacks or hand lances from a tank on or near water only, the pre-requisite is PA1. Training is one day plus one day for the assessment.

Lowe Maintenance Training courses, all in Settle BD24 9DN, contact: 01729 825132 info@lowe-maintenance.co.uk http://www.lowe-maintenance.co.uk

08/11/2018   RSPH Level 2 Award in the safe use of Rodenticides   1 Day

Bury St Edmunds, Pest Solution. Contact: 01284 766362 info@pestsolution.co.uk http://www.pestcontroltraining.co

The RSPH Level 2 Award in the Safe Use of Rodenticides provides learners with an understanding of why the purchase and use of rodenticides is controlled and why other rodent control methods should be considered before rodenticides are used.

09/11/2018   Safe Use of Brush Cutters and Trimmers NPTC / City and Guilds    1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

One day integrated training and assessment covering pre use checks, maintenance and safe use. Ideal for those in industries such as horticultural, landscaping, grounds maintenance sectors.

12/11/2018   Chainsaw Maintenance, Cross Cutting and Felling and Processing of Trees up to 380mm (formally CS30 and CS31) NPTC / City and Guilds    4 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

Four days training plus a fifth day for the assessment. Covering the maintenance of a chainsaw, cross cutting and felling and processing trees upto 380mm in diameter Ideal for those new to chainsaws or those needing certificates of competence evidence.

13/11/2018   Safe Use of Hedge Cutters Handheld NPTC / City and Guilds    1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

One day integrated training and assessment covering pre use checks, maintenance and safe use. Ideal for those in industries such as horticultural, landscaping, grounds maintenance sectors.

14/11/2018   Safe Use of Leaf Blowers NPTC / City and Guilds    0.5 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

Half a day integrated training and assessment covering pre use checks, maintenance and safe use. Ideal for those in industries such as horticultural, landscaping, grounds maintenance sectors.

15/11/2018   Safe Use of Rat and Mice Poison NPTC / City and Guilds    1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

Any one who uses rat/mice poison as a professional (farmer/gamekeeper/pest controller etc) will need a certificate of competence from Spring 2016. This one day course plus one day assessment upon achievement will enable you to purchase the rodenticides you require for pest control

16/11/2018   ROLO Health, Safety & Environmental Awareness   1 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

This one day course is a pre requisite for anyone within the land based industries who require a CSCS card to work on sites

19/11/2018   Tree Climbing and Aerial Rescue (formally CS38) NPTC / City and Guilds    5 Day at Lowe Maintenance Training

A five day course plus one day assessment. Covering accessing a tree safely, positioning techniques within the crown and aerial rescue methods. Equipment can be provided please contact us for more details

Lowe Maintenance Training courses, all in Settle BD24 9DN, contact: 01729 825132 info@lowe-maintenance.co.uk http://www.lowe-maintenance.co.uk

22/11/2018   Lantra Brushcutters & Trimmers   2 Day

Stirling, TCV Scotland. Contact: 01786 476170 Scotland-training@tcv.org.uk http://c-js.co.uk/2ysVU9j

This course will teach you all you need to know about Brushcutters and Trimmers and will lead to a LANTRA certificate.

 

Updates and Additions to other sections of Training Directory this month

Longer courses

Botany and Horticulture

Grow Leaders by Avon Wildlife Trust

Practical Sustainability Course with Shift Bristol

 

Training Centre / provider listings

Adventure Lifesigns Ltd

 

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Additions to the Grants and sources of funding listings.

 

Alice McCosh Trust

Northumberland Coast AONB Partnership

The Dean Organic Fund from Organic Research Centre

Woodland Trust tree giveaway

Groundwork (Tesco Bags of Help)

 

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The next edition of CJS Professional will be published on: 11 October

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