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Critical evidence is missing from Sizewell C application say wildlife charities - RSPB

The RSPB and Suffolk Wildlife Trust (SWT) say that critical evidence is missing from EDF’s Sizewell C Development Consent Order (DCO) application and must therefore conclude that the build must not go ahead.

Without this evidence, the charities say they can’t properly assess the application and all its potential impacts on nature and the environment at RSPB Minsmere, Sizewell Marshes SSSI (Site of Special Scientific Interest) and beyond.

The lack of evidence is causing concern as it leaves an uncertain future for several protected animals including: otters, water voles, marsh harriers, bats, natterjack toads, red-throated divers and more.

In some cases, plans to mitigate the impacts on these species either don’t exist or are seriously lacking in detail.

The charities say that Sizewell C will result in catastrophic losses for nature, not a net-gain for nature as EDF claims.

The RSPB and Suffolk Wildlife Trust (SWT) are deeply concerned that critical evidence is missing from EDF’s Sizewell C DCO application. Without this evidence, the charities say they can’t properly assess the application and all its potential impacts on nature and the environment at RSPB Minsmere, Sizewell Marshes SSSI and beyond.

During recent public consultations, the RSPB and SWT raised concerns about several potential environmental impacts where critical evidence was missing or inadequate, meaning EDF’s assessments are incomplete. Conservationists were therefore disappointed to find that this evidence is still missing from the final application.

84% of you told us that lockdown gave you the opportunity to further connect with wildlife - Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust

Connecting with wildlife provided a much needed boost to health and wellbeing during lockdown © David Bocking
© David Bocking

The results of a recent ‘Wild in Lockdown’ survey by Sheffield and Rotherham Wildlife Trust showed that lockdown gave people the opportunity to further connect with wildlife. The Trust received some wonderful stories with many of you enjoying activities such as; daily walks in local green spaces, bird watching, wildlife gardening, talking to children about wildlife and completing DIY projects such as building hedgehogs homes, insect hotels and creating mini ponds.

Connecting with wildlife provided a much needed boost to health and wellbeing during lockdown and many of you shared your wild in lockdown memories – here are some of the Trust’s favourite stories you shared.

“This was a very special, memorable spring. I walked for an hour a day locally and each day saw different things to make me feel glad and privileged to live where I do on the edge of Sheffield, bordering the Derbyshire countryside. It re-enforced the knowledge and feeling that we need to return in a massive way to connecting with nature, re-wilding and protecting it. We need to pave the way for a new kind of living that puts this at its centre.” Deborah

“Seeing the birds in my garden every day, I’m working from home and have had more time to spend in my garden. I made a wildlife pond and a bug hotel.” Sharon

“Watching fox cubs playing in our garden; spotting a reed bunting on the rocky shore of a moorland reservoir near us; hearing masses of willow warblers; spotting a family of mergansers…adults and 12 or more chicks on the River Rother; spotting flowers on a walk down Coombs Dale, Derbyshire; and above everything else, the arrival of the swifts.” David

It is clear from the survey results that wildlife was vitally important to many during lockdown and it gave people an escape from the worries of the Coronavirus pandemic. It allowed people to take the time to notice and appreciate the small wonders of nature on their doorstep; noticing the cheery daffodils of spring and carpets of bluebells in summer, and simply enjoying the wildlife all around us.

New report: birds provide hopeful message on targets to save nature - Birdlife

You may have heard about the world’s catastrophic failure to meet global biodiversity targets. But there's hope. A new landmark report from BirdLife International uses bird conservation successes to outline recommended solutions that could help the next set of targets to succeed.

Today, BirdLife released a new report, Birds and Biodiversity Targets, which builds on the recent coverage of the world’s catastrophic failure to meet global targets to save biodiversity. While there is plenty of doom and gloom around this subject, there have also been numerous successes over the past decade that demonstrate how achievable – and affordable – nature conservation can be with sufficient political investment.

Birds and Biodiversity Targets, part of our flagship State of the World’s Birds series, uses our extensive global research to provide a road map to ensure the 2020s are not just another “lost decade for nature”. As well as outlining the shortfalls of each of the targets, this publication also brings a message of hope to the world, using bird conservation successes to show that solutions exist for the problems facing the biosphere, and that nature can recover swiftly when these are enacted.

The report aims to dispel the idea that the governments failed because the targets were unachievable, outlining the actions needed to plot a course where, by 2050, nature and humanity can live in harmony.



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