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Nature-friendly farming methods allow biodiversity to flourish at Wimpole - National Trust

Nature and soil health are flourishing at Wimpole Home Farm near Cambridge according to the results of a full ‘health-check’ into its biodiversity, carbon levels and levels of public accessibility.

A male skylark singing in flight © National Trust Images/Nick Upton
A male skylark singing in flight © National Trust Images/Nick Upton

The results, announced as the landmark Agriculture Bill which starts its next crucial stage in the House of Lords tomorrow (10 June), show increases in the numbers of breeding pairs of rare farmland birds, invertebrates and how the land can significantly capture carbon.

Mark Harold, Director of Land and Nature at the National Trust said: ‘Sustainable, productive and profitable farming is underpinned by a healthy environment. Coronavirus has shown how important it is to have a resilient food and farming system. We know that climate change and sustainability pose the greatest threats to food security, as this year’s flooding and now drought have shown. The Agriculture Bill – and the principle of public money for public goods at its heart – is an opportunity to deliver this. With a focus on sustainable land management, wildlife and soil health can recover quicker than we might think. The story at Wimpole paints one of hope and optimism – and the government’s forthcoming “environmental land management scheme” will be crucial to replicating this across the farming industry, as will the new Agriculture Bill in prioritising government support for this scheme. Together, these two mechanisms will ensure all farms have a sustainable future which will be good for the environment, good for farm businesses and good for people.’

The organic farm has been focusing on nature-friendly, sustainable farming methods for the past 12 years to reflect our goals for farming models which are good for nature, good for the public and are profitable.

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