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Reconnecting with nature key for the health of people and the planet - University of Plymouth

(Credit University of Plymouth)
(Credit University of Plymouth)

A study led by the University also showed people who make weekly nature visits are more likely to behave in ways which promote environmental health

Individuals who visit natural spaces weekly, and feel psychologically connected to them, report better physical and mental wellbeing, new research has shown.

Alongside the benefits to public health, those who make weekly nature visits, or feel connected to nature, are also more likely to behave in ways which promote environmental health, such as recycling and conservation activities.

The findings of the study, published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology, indicate that reconnecting with nature could be key to achieving synergistic improvements to human and planetary health.

The study was conducted by researchers at the University of Plymouth, Natural England, the University of Exeter and University of Derby, and is the first to investigate – within a single study – the contribution of both nature contact and connection to human health, wellbeing and pro-environmental behaviours.

The findings are based on responses to the Monitor of Engagement with the Natural Environment (MENE) survey, commissioned by Natural England as part of DEFRA’s social science research programme. The team looked at people’s engagement with nature through access to greenspace, nature visits and the extent to which they felt psychologically connected to the natural world.

Read the paper here.