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CJS Professional

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Countryside Jobs Service Professional - The leading monthly for countryside staff across the UK

Published on the second Thursday every month

CJS is endorsed by the Scottish Countryside Rangers Association and the Countryside Management Association

Please remember: If you are interested in a particular advert or item please contact the advertiser, not CJS, and remember to tell them you saw their advert in CJS Professional.

Featured Charity: Mammal Society

Find out more about our featured charity here.

Including how to join and donate.

Contents:

Click the headers to browse each section, or click on each item (or the [more] button)

 

Jobs

Title

Employer

Location (basis / contract details)

Countryside Officer

Test Valley Borough Council

Andover (Permanent contract, 37 hpw)

Catchment Officer - River Aire

The Aire Rivers Trust

River Aire Catchment, Yorkshire (full-time post)

Ecologists, Consultant Ecologists and Senior Ecologists

EMEC Ecology

based in Nottingham city  (Permanent, Full or Part Time)

Reserve (Site) Manager

Manx BirdLife (Isle of Man)

Isle of Man (Initial two-year contract. Secondments will be considered)

Reserves Manager (North)

Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

based at the Idle Valley Rural Learning Centre, North Road, Retford, Nottinghamshire, DN22 8RQ (Permanent, Full Time role)

Senior / Principal Ecologist

Biodiverse Consulting Ltd

 Based: Home / Ponteland, Northumberland (Hours: full & part time considered)

 Biodiversity Officer

The Heart of England Forest

Dorsington, Warks 

Forest Ranger

The Heart of England Forest

Dorsington, Warks 

Machine Operator

Chris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd

 Far Stanley, Cheltenham

Senior Arboricultural Officer

Test Valley Borough Council

 Andover

Tree Surgeon

Chris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd

 Cheltenham

Gardener / Couple - Kingstone Lisle Park

KLP Estate

Kingstone Lisle Park

 Woodland Creation Assistant

North York Moors National Park Authority 

 Based in Helmsley but with substantial travel around the National Park.

Somerset Nature Connections Project Manager

Somerset Wildlife Trust

Based in Taunton but with opportunities for home working by agreement. Three year contract. 4 days or 30 hours per week

Land Operations Manager (South)

John Muir Trust 

 Home-based with travel to Trust properties and offices, as required. (Permanent, full time, 35 hpw)

Trainer / Assessor - Agriculture

Derby College

 Derby College Farm

Volunteering and Community Engagement Officer

Vincent Wildlife Trust

 based near Ledbury in Herefordshire. (permanent, full-time)

Visitor Services Manager 

Lulworth Estate

 Jurassic Coast, Dorset.

Woodmeadow Officer

 

Woodmeadow Trust

 flexibility to work from home, you should expect to work regularly at Three Hagges Woodmeadow, Escrick, near York. (three-year contract, with a six-month probation period)

Apprenticeships, Interns and paid trainee roles   

 Forestry Intern

 The Heart of England Forest

 Dorsington, Warks (Fixed term contract – 1 year)

 Countryside Worker Apprentice

 North York Moors National Park Authority

 Based in either Castleton or Helmsley

 

Volunteers

Still very quiet on the volunteering front. But we are getting some enquiries so now would be a good time to ensure you have a listing on the Volunteers Directory, a simple description about your organisation and the types of volunteering you (normally) offer can be added free here See what's already listed here.

 

CJS Information and other articles

What a year it's been!  Somehow another year has come and gone and once again it's our 'official' birthday - CJS is 26 years old this month.

In January 2019 we excitedly entered our silver anniversary year announcing a change in logo for the special year. We gave away birthday presents and shared our birthday wishes, wrote articles about CJS, launched a new website (a little later than planned) and opened our first Photography Competition.  I should be announcing the winners today - but a global pandemic put paid to that! As I'm sure you'll agree the last few months have been a rollercoaster.  Even a round, spikey virus can't keep CJS down for long and we have one or two new developments to come before our next birthday.  [more]

It's the last month for entries in our Photography Competition, the suggested theme is Hidden Gems and the prize is a bundle of goodies from The Mammal Society and others. [more]

And we have a winner for June, the theme was From my Window.  We all agreed that this month was the most difficult choice yet, you sent us some amazing photos. From a shortlist of six we managed to whittle it down to three and then ended up taking a vote which was narrowly won by this lovely photo of a young robin waiting patiently for its turn on the fat feeder which the photographer Adrian Button tells us is just out of shot. [more]

 

Graduate and undergraduate talent is always just around the corner with The Open University By J. Renshaw

The last few months have been tough for most organisations across the country, and it has shown just how vital it is for the graduate labour market to be flexible and able to adapt. Luckily, with The Open University, your next talented recruit is always just around the corner. [more]

We know times are tough for everyone right now so CJS want to give every graduating student a graduation gift of a year's subscription to CJS Weekly. [more]

 

Nominations for NBN Awards for Wildlife Recording 2020 will close in just a few short weeks on 26 July.

The annual Awards recognise and celebrate the outstanding contributions made by individuals and groups to wildlife recording, there are five categories. [more]

 

Having paused the Focus editions for this year we're increasing the number of features and in depth articles we publish. And we're asking you what information would you like to see in CJS? [more]  Or go straight to tell us waht you'd like to see here.

 

Features and In Depth Articles

Furlonteer.com: the new non-profit project connecting furloughed employees with the charities and good causes who need it most.

A brand new, organically-grown community initiative aiming to connect people on furlough with remote volunteer opportunities for charities and good causes. With seven in ten UK firms having furloughed staff and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme recently extended to the end of October, Furlonteer.com is rapidly gaining traction.  [more]

Go Jauntly launches smartphone ‘nature diary’ to boost mental health

A free smartphone-based ‘nature prescription’ for mental health developed by the team behind the popular walking app Go Jauntly along with researchers at the University of Derby has been launched. [more]

Coping in the Countryside – Post Lockdown by Andy Bloomfield, Senior Warden, Holkham NNR

2020 will undoubtedly go down as one of the most dramatic years our country has faced probably since the Second World War. A World-wide pandemic and the catastrophe of thousands of deaths here in the UK, dealing with a forced Lockdown for those fortunate enough to stay virus free, alongside all manner of civil unrest; sometimes it didn’t feel it could get much worse. Out in the countryside it seemed different, a slight cause for celebration almost.

A follow up article to: Holkham National Nature Reserve – Changing Times during the Covid 19 Pandemic published in April 2020. [more]

National Meadows Day: Why saving and protecting wild flower meadows can help deliver a green recovery By Ian Dunn, Plantlife Chief Executive

Plantlife is one of a national partnership of organisations calling for a National Nature Service as part of the government’s response to the pandemic. We are calling for Government to invest in a scheme that will create tens of thousands of jobs, improve the health of nature, people and the planet, and contribute to a green, sustainable recovery. That is to build, build, build a green economy. The restoration and creation of wildflower meadows can act as a central plank of the green recovery we need. A staggering 97% of British wildflower meadows have been eradicated in less than a century and species-rich grassland now covers less than 1% of the UK.  [more]

 

CJS Focus

The most recent edition: Environmental Education and Outdoor Activities view the most recent edition here or download a pdf copy.

The next edition will be published on 12 November looking at: Ecology and Biodiversity BUT is dependent on the status of the ongoing coronavirus outbreak nearer the time. 

 

News

Green Recovery

  

Funding and new partnerships

  

Pollution, sustainability and climate

 

Land and Countryside Management

  

Environmental Education, Recreation and volunteering

 

Scientific Research, Results and Publications

  

Animal and wildlife news

 

Training

Details of recently added online events and learning. 

  

CJS Newsletters and updates:

CJS Weekly: subscription only weekly newsletter. Receive details of all vacancies and information advertised with CJS. Find out more here. Instant access here.

Daily email with details of latest vacancies, news and general information. Sign up free here.


   

CJS Professional: 11 July 2020

Jobs: view all online jobs here

 


Logo: Test Valley Borough CouncilTest Valley Borough Council

Countryside Officer

Grade 6 £24,279 - £26,611 per annum

37 hours per week

Permanent contract

Andover

Working within Community and Leisure team you will help guide the day to day management of our nature reserves and green spaces throughout the borough.

The position calls for a knowledge and understanding of ecological issues, legislation and policies as well as the ability to write, implement and then monitor the effects of site management plans. You will be confident dealing with contractors and happy to manage our livestock which graze some of our sites.

Your ecological knowledge will be matched with your enthusiasm and commitment to lead practical volunteer work parties with the community and inspire schools, universities and the local community to the importance of nature conservation.

To be successful you will need to be a confident communicator, and be able to demonstrate a good understanding of practical terrestrial and aquatic habitat management, ecological surveys and experience of leading volunteer and school groups. A licence to enable you to survey and handle great crested newts is an essential requirement for this role.

An ecological / countryside management qualification and the ability to use Microsoft applications are essential as is your ability to work evenings and weekends.

For an informal discussion about the post please contact Boyce Jeffery, Senior Countryside Officer, on 01264 368823.

In return we offer a competitive salary, good terms and conditions, uniform and the option to join the Superannuation pension scheme.

For more information or if you are interested in applying for this position please visit the Current Vacancies page on our website.

Closing date for return of application forms - Monday 20 July 2020

Committed to equality of opportunity in employment and services.


TLogo: The Aire Rivers Trusthe Aire Rivers Trust

Catchment Officer - River Aire

Are you looking for the chance to make a BIG difference to the aquatic environment?

The River Aire Catchment ranges from the limestone pavement uplands of Malham, through deeply rural and massively urban environments down to the lowlands where it meets the Ouse at Airmyn. It has its glories as well as its challenges and we are looking for someone to take a lead in making it a great river again.

We are recruiting for a Catchment Officer to develop and help deliver the River Aire Catchment Plan as part of the River Basin Planning process currently underway. This will bring together stakeholders with a wide range of affiliations across the catchment to understand the ecological and other pressures on the catchment, develop a deliverable plan and then work with those stakeholders to develop and seek funding for projects.

You will lead, develop and support the Aire Catchment Network, a Catchment Host.

You will need to be:

You will be working as part of a team of 4 or 5 people in our rapidly expanding Trust and will get the chance to share skills and workload across the team This full-time post will have a salary of £25-28,000 pa plus expenses. You must have your own transport, for which an appropriate mileage allowance will be paid and we may require you to have a DBS check.

Details and how to apply at https://aireriverstrust.org.uk/work-for-us/

Applications close at noon on 17th July.


Logo: EMEC EcologyEMEC Ecology

We are looking for experienced Ecologists, Consultant Ecologists and Senior Ecologists

Contract type: Permanent

Working hours: Full or Part Time

Are you an experienced Ecologist looking for a new challenge? We have an exciting opportunity for Ecologists, Consultant Ecologists and Senior Ecologists to join our growing business and friendly team based in Nottingham city.

If you’re interested, please send your CV and covering letter outlining your experience to emecvacancies@emec-ecology.co.uk without delay!

We are an equal opportunities employer and positively encourage applications from suitably qualified and eligible candidates regardless of sex, race, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion or belief, marital status, or pregnancy and maternity. As an employer we are committed to promoting and protecting the physical and mental health of all our staff.

Interested? Find out more...

As a commercial subsidiary of Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust, we have the conservation and restoration of nature at our heart. When delivering our clients’ projects and objectives, we look for biodiversity net-gain wherever possible and through our ecology, land management and arboricultural services we deliver innovative solutions to benefit habitats and species.

The Roles:
We are seeking experienced and passionate Ecologists at different levels in their careers. For the minimum experience levels required for each role please see below:

Ecologist
£19,461 - £22,142
Ecological survey and assessment experience; Demonstrable ID skills; Knowledge of current legislation, policy and industry best practice; Excellent communication skills; Good reporting writing skills; Efficient administration and organisation skills.

Consultant Ecologist
£22,908 – £25,208
Protected species survey licence(s); Substantial experience in conducting protected species surveys and developing appropriate recommendations; Excellent species ID skills; A good working knowledge of current legislation, policy and industry best practice; Excellent communication, project management, reporting and organisational skills.

Senior Ecologist
Up to £34,500
Extensive experience in a Senior Ecologist role within consultancy setting; Protected species survey licence(s); Extensive experience in protected species surveying and mitigation design, including being Named Ecologist on EPS mitigation licences*; Excellent species ID skills, including botanical (phase-1 habitat survey); In-depth understanding of current legislation, policy and industry best practice; Excellent communication, project management, reporting and organisational skills; Experience of managing the work of others; Ability to forge strong client relationships.
*If you are a competent bat surveyor (Natural England Class 2 Licence holder) and have experience in being the Named Ecologist on EPS bat mitigation licence applications this would be advantageous.

A full driving licence is required for all posts.

Benefits of working for us

Further information on EMEC and this role (including role profiles) is available at emec-ecology.co.uk/careers


Logo: Manx BirdlifeManx BirdLife (Isle of Man)

Reserve (Site) Manager

Contract: Initial two-year contract. Secondments will be considered.
Based: Isle of Man
Salary: Negotiable
Expressions of interest: by 31 July 2020
Role commencing: As soon as possible

This is an exciting opportunity to use your expertise in gravel pit restoration and site management to develop a major new nature reserve at the Isle of Man’s famous Point of Ayre.

Initially comprising 105 acres, the reserve has potential to grow to 400+ acres as quarrying concludes in further areas across the site. The mix of open freshwater, dry scrub and heathland is unique within the Isle of Man, attracting a similarly unique assemblage of fauna and flora.

Joining us as Reserve (Site) Manager at this early stage of this long-term project gives you every opportunity to make your mark on the reserve’s goals and design. You’ll be responsible for all aspects of reserve development, management, monitoring and improvement.

Essential skills and knowledge:

   ●   Principles of quarry restoration and management for nature   ●   Business management including budgeting, planning   ●   Health and safety in the countryside   ●   Supporter, visitor, volunteer, supplier and public relations

Essential experience:

   ●   Proven record of reserve/site management   ●   Planning applications, liaising with regulatory authorities   ●   Visitor management   ●   A relevant qualification (e.g. ecology, environmental management) is required.
For full details (including more about the Point of Ayre, Job Description, Terms of Work) click here.

For an informal conversation, contact Neil Morris, Managing Director at neil@manxbirdlife.im.

Expressions of interest are requested by Friday 31 July 2020.

[The Isle of Man is a great place to live and work, with convenient transport links to the UK and other parts of the British Isles. See https://www.locate.im. The role will suit someone wishing to move temporarily or permanently to the Island.]


Logo: Nottinghamshire Wildlife TrustNottinghamshire Wildlife Trust

Reserves Manager (North)

We are looking for a passionate and committed professional to manage our Reserves in the North of the county. This is a key role within the Trust with responsibility of habitat management, safeguarding of species, reserve engagement experiences and management of the Trusts flagship Idle Valley Nature Reserve.

The ideal candidate will have a senior level experience of practical land management for nature conservation.

About us: The Nottinghamshire Wildlife Trust is the county's leading conservation charity run by local people for the benefit of local wildlife, with nature reserves across the county - part of a UK network of 46 local Wildlife Trusts working to protect wildlife.

Salary: £27,735 per annum

Contract: This is a permanent, Full Time role

Location: The post is based at the Idle Valley Rural Learning Centre, North Road, Retford, Nottinghamshire, DN22 8RQ. There will be also be regular travel to various locations throughout the county.

How to apply

For more information on the role and full details on how to apply please head to our website.

The closing time and date for applications is 17:00 on Thursday 16 July 2020.

The Trust and its subsidiaries are an equal opportunities employers and positively encourage applications from suitably qualified and eligible candidates regardless of sex, race, disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion or belief, marital status, or pregnancy and maternity. As an employer we are committed to promoting and protecting the physical and mental health of all our staff.


Logo: Biodiverse Consulting LtdBiodiverse Consulting Ltd

Senior / Principal Ecologist

Based: Home / Ponteland, Northumberland

Salary: Negotiable

Hours: full & part time considered

Closing Date: Wednesday 15th July 2020

We are seeking a talented, professional ecologist at a senior or principal level, who can offer creative solutions for clients and wildlife alike.

You will bid, win and deliver a range of ecological survey, assessment and net gain projects that exceed client expectations without compromising your passion for wildlife and habitats. Alongside the Managing Director you will be responsible for the co-ordination and safe delivery of projects on time and on budget, working with collaborators and sub-contractors where required. Training and mentoring of junior members of the team will be a key aspect of your role. Your input into the design of the ecology services will be sought and there will be a requirement for proactive marketing.

Demonstrable track record in commercial consultancy and experience of Biodiversity Net Gain are essential alongside a minimum of 1 protected species class 2 licence & CIEEM membership.

We are keen to offer the right role to the right person and so flexible working patterns and hours (part of full time) that meet your needs as well as ours, are available.

For an application pack email enquiries@biodiverseconsulting.co.uk or call 0191 303 7805 for an informal chat about the role.

Logo: Balancing Business and Diversity 


Logo: The Heart of England ForestThe Heart of England Forest

Biodiversity Officer

The Heart of England Forest is an exciting and ambitious charity working hard to create a huge new woodland in the heart of the country that will benefit people and wildlife for generations to come. Already the largest new native broadleaf woodland in the country, we take our mission very seriously; it has never been more important to invest in our natural environment. Planting trees and creating new woodlands is no longer just a positive ambition for the country, it’s absolutely essential. It is the simplest solution to help mitigate climate change and create new green spaces that can help reconnect people and communities with nature and the natural environment.

Our goal is to reach 30,000 acres of semi contiguous forest by planting 13 million native broadleaf trees. To date we have planted more than 1.8 million trees. The significance and scale of our work cannot be underestimated: The Heart of England Forest - already the largest new native forest in the country – will become one of the largest forests in the UK.

Not only is our Forest expanding, so, to, is our team. If you share our ambition, we have a number of exciting opportunities for you to join us. The charity is a rewarding place to work and offers its staff a number of benefits.

Please visit www.heartofenglandforest.com/get-involved/jobs/ to download a job description / person specification and an application form. Please note that CVs will not be accepted in lieu of a completed application form.

Biodiversity Officer - Salary £25,000 plus benefits

Are you an enthusiastic and experienced conservation professional looking for a rewarding role involved in optimising biodiversity within a national charity?

With our changing climate it is now more important than ever to provide nature recovery networks for wildlife on a landscape-scale. The Heart of England Forest is well placed to provide such a haven for wildlife, and for the enjoyment of local people.

Optimising Biodiversity is already a core activity in the Forest. The Forest is a mosaic of habitats, including ancient woodland, new native broadleaf plantations, grassland, wetland, heathland, and farmland. The Forest is a home to many rare and threatened species, such as brown hairstreak and purple emperor butterflies, as well as Red List bird species such as skylark and woodcock. We aspire to create and enhance biodiverse habitats, providing a nature recovery network, to ensure species survival and resilience in the face of our changing climate.

The Biodiversity Officer is responsible for delivering biodiversity enhancement projects within the mosaic of habitats which form the Heart of England Forest. We are looking for someone with habitat creation and enhancement experience, particularly in relation to wetland habitats and natural flood management, who is keen to learn and has a “can do” attitude, and who will be a passionate ambassador for the charity.

The ideal candidate will be a team player, comfortable in delivering biodiversity enhancement projects from development to implementation, drawing up projects, working with and supervising contractors and volunteers.

We would love to hear from an experienced conservation professional able to use their own initiative, looking for their next challenge, who is committed to conservation and enthusiastic about making a positive contribution to landscape-scale conservation.

Closing date: Sunday 9th August 2020

Interview date: Thursday 20th August 2020


Logo: The Heart of England ForestThe Heart of England Forest

Forest Ranger

The Heart of England Forest is an exciting and ambitious charity working hard to create a huge new woodland in the heart of the country that will benefit people and wildlife for generations to come. Already the largest new native broadleaf woodland in the country, we take our mission very seriously; it has never been more important to invest in our natural environment. Planting trees and creating new woodlands is no longer just a positive ambition for the country, it’s absolutely essential. It is the simplest solution to help mitigate climate change and create new green spaces that can help reconnect people and communities with nature and the natural environment.

Our goal is to reach 30,000 acres of semi contiguous forest by planting 13 million native broadleaf trees. To date we have planted more than 1.8 million trees. The significance and scale of our work cannot be underestimated: The Heart of England Forest - already the largest new native forest in the country – will become one of the largest forests in the UK.

Not only is our Forest expanding, so, to, is our team. If you share our ambition, we have a number of exciting opportunities for you to join us. The charity is a rewarding place to work and offers its staff a number of benefits.

Please visit www.heartofenglandforest.com/get-involved/jobs/ to download a job description / person specification and an application form. Please note that CVs will not be accepted in lieu of a completed application form.

Forest Ranger - Salary £22,000 plus benefits

2 roles: 1 permanent, 1 temporary (6 months fixed term contract with a possible extension)

We are seeking an experienced practical forestry team leader (s). This is an interesting role which will give the successful candidate an opportunity to grow and shape England’s largest new native broadleaf woodland. We are looking for an enthusiastic individual who is keen to progress their career, has a “can do” attitude and will be a passionate ambassador for the charity.

You will lead a small team responsible for forest access and maintenance working anywhere within the 7,000 acre estate. The winter months will predominantly be tree planting when you will join the rest of the forestry team establishing new woodland within the Heart of England Forest.

In this role you will work with, and be supported by, our wider forestry team to deliver operational plans to ensure that the Heart of England Forest achieves the aims and objectives set out in its strategic plan. This will include working with the staff team, volunteers, corporate supporters and contractors to achieve our vision of a 30,000-acre contiguous woodland.

As well as practical forestry you will be involved in maintaining and widening public access, improving our diverse habitats and championing the Heart of England Forest.

Closing date: Monday 3rd August

Interview date: Tuesday 18th August


Logo: Chris Arnold Tree Surgery LtdChris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd

Machine Operator

Far Stanley, Cheltenham

We are looking for a friendly and reliable machine operator to assist us with our expanding forestry business. Must be capable of driving various size diggers, forwarders, tractors and use winches etc. Must be able to do hand cutting where necessary and in the winter months may be required to do some ground works on tree surgery.

For further information and to apply, please email chrisarnoldtreesurgery01@gmail.com

Chris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd, The Oakleys, Far Stanley, Nr Cheltenham, GL54 5HF.  01242 621051 07917866912


Logo: Test Valley Borough CouncilTest Valley Borough Council

Senior Arboricultural Officer

£32,048 - £35,220 pa plus essential car allowance
Andover (ref 50361013)

We are looking or a highly professional Arboriculturalist to take the lead with the sustainable management of the boroughs tree stock.

You will be joining Test Valley Borough Council at an exciting time where good tree management, tree protection and increasing tree cover have never been more important. This set against the challenge of climate emergency, ash dieback and oak processionary moth.

To be successful you will have a minimum qualification of a Professional Diploma in Arboriculture, you’ll be confident and conversant with all aspects of arboriculture including tree biology, hazard assessment and tree protection legislation. A working knowledge of best practice in tree surgery work will be coupled with good communication and negotiation skills.

This role will see you come into contact with members of the public and councillors as well as other Council departments so excellent communication skills are a must.

We pride ourselves on our positive and supportive working environment, and feedback from our employees continually shows high levels of staff satisfaction. Amongst the benefits we offer are a defined benefits pension scheme, generous holiday allowance, free parking on site, staff restaurant and discounted leisure facilities

For an informal discussion about the post please contact Kevin Harrington, Parks and Countryside Manager, on 01264 368815

For more information and to apply please visit the careers page on our website

Closing date for return of application forms - 27 July 2020

Committed to equality of opportunity in employment and services.


Logo: Chris Arnold Tree Surgery LtdChris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd

Tree Surgeon

Cheltenham

Salary dependent on experience £24,000 plus.

An ideal candidate would look like this:

Willing to be flexible if this is not exactly met:

An experienced tree surgeon required with two or more years’ experience to join our established and thriving company within the Cheltenham area. Must be able to work well as part of a friendly team. We work for both domestic and commercial clients so good communication skills with members of the public is a must. The candidate will be able to climb confidently and be able to perform all aspects of tree surgery from reductions to felling. Must have at least CS30, CS31, CS38 and CS39 and further training can be given to continue with professional development if required.

For further information and to apply, please email chrisarnoldtreesurgery01@gmail.com

Chris Arnold Tree Surgery Ltd, The Oakleys, Far Stanley, Nr Cheltenham, GL54 5HF. 01242 621051 07917866912


KLP Estate

Gardener / Couple - Kingstone Lisle Park

KLP House is a 17th century house standing in 10 acres of gardens. The House was purchased as part of a larger estate in 2018, the new owners have the vision of transforming the gardens and surrounding landscape back to their former glory.

The position requires an enthusiastic, self-motivated person with exacting standards.

The position could ideally be suited to a couple, the partner assisting with the gardens and main House.

An attractive package available with two bedroom cottage, salary dependant on qualifications and experience.

Please apply to barry@klp.estate Tel: 07778212633


Logo: North York Moors National Park AuthorityNorth York Moors National Park Authority

Woodland Creation Assistant

£25.2 to £27.9 with potential progression to £31.3K.

Would you like to have a long term beneficial impact on the landscape and wildlife of the North York Moors National Park?

This is an exciting opportunity to join our woodland team to help establish new woodlands within the National Park. This is a permanent post to help deliver our ambitious long term woodland creation targets associated with the Woodsmith Mine’s Section 106 agreement.

We are looking for someone who has experience of working with landowners to grant aid conservation work, particularly tree planting schemes. You will need to have a practical understanding of land management and woodland creation as well as a methodical and organised approach to work.

To back this up, you will need to tell us about your;

   ●   Knowledge of woodland ecology;   ●   Skills in achieving good quality work from contractors;   ●   Grant processing skills;    ●   Success working with volunteers; and   ●   Positive experience of working in a team.
Based in Helmsley but with substantial travel around the National Park.

Application forms and further details can be obtained by looking at the Job Opportunities page on our website

Closing date: 9am on Friday 24 July 2020

Interviews are scheduled for Thursday 6 August 2020 (the interview will be face to face (social distancing rules apply)


Logo: Somerset Wildlife TrustSomerset Wildlife Trust

Somerset Nature Connections Project Manager

Up to £30,000 per annum pro-rata to 4 days or 30 hours per week.

Three year contract

Based in Taunton but with opportunities for home working by agreement.

The role will involve some travel throughout the county, including time in the offices of Blackdown, Mendip and Quantock Hills AONB’s.

Somerset Nature Connections is a new project designed to support mental wellbeing through the delivery of nature connection activities. It is run in partnership between Somerset Wildlife Trust and Blackdown, Mendip and Quantock Hills AONB’s and funded by the National Lottery Community Fund and Somerset County Council

We are seeking an exceptional individual for this exciting role, hosted by Somerset Wildlife Trust. The role exists to oversee the successful set up and delivery of this project, managing three delivery officers who will work across the county and ensuring the project outcomes for improved wellbeing amongst participants are met.

You will have proven experience of engaging and working with diverse communities on initiatives that support physical and mental wellbeing and you will have a good understanding of the role that nature can play and the evidence base that demonstrates this. The successful candidate will need a track record in large scale multi-partner project management, directly managing staff, complex work programmes, external relationships and substantial funding streams.

We are looking for an enthusiastic and skilled individual, who will be a passionate and effective champion for nature and its role in supporting public health. You will be innovative, resilient and self-motivated – a solution seeker – who is an excellent and persuasive communicator. It is a fantastic opportunity for a highly capable and motivated individual.

For more information and to apply click here 

Closing date: All applications must be received by 8am Friday 24th July 2020.


Logo: John Muir TrustJohn Muir Trust

Land Operations Manager (South)

Salary: £35,000 p.a.

Hours: Full-time (35 hours a week)

Term: Permanent

Location: Home-based with travel to Trust properties and offices, as required

Holidays: 34 days per year inclusive of bank holidays

Pension: 5% employer contribution to a group auto-enrolment pension scheme

The John Muir Trust is looking for a Land Operations Manager to oversee John Muir Trust property management, partnerships and liaison with communities, in Scotland and the Lake District.

This is an exciting opportunity to make a difference for wild land. The post will oversee Trust-managed properties at Ben Nevis, Schiehallion, Glenlude and Glenridding / Helvellyn including: staff management; budget setting and monitoring; and project development and delivery. This role will support and liaise with John Muir Trust land partners and explore and develop new partnerships and wider community engagement.

For full details and to apply, go to the John Muir Trust website.


Derby College

Trainer / Assessor - Agriculture

We are looking for a well-motivated Trainer / Assessor with a knowledge of the Agricultural world.
Derby College Farm is a very busy, forward thinking centre. The team are ambitious and proud of their achievements and work environment. We are a small, hands-on and extremely hard working team, striving for excellence at all times, we adopt a professional and industry correct manner and create an environment where the welfare of the animals is our primary concern. You should be organised and have excellent interpersonal skills together with a commitment to working effectively as part of a team.
Your primary focus will be delivering national qualifications, NPTC qualifications including Tractor and Trailer, telescopic fork lift, ATV and other learning programmes within a variety of settings, ensuring achievement of agreed performance and quality targets. You will be expected to strive to maintain above average success rates in all areas, using innovation within your teaching and assessing and utilising e-learning opportunities where appropriate.
The successful candidate will have proven experience of providing outstanding support for learners and will be flexible, self-motivated and dedicated to student achievement and quality.

Please visit www.derby-college.ac.uk/jobs to apply online.


Logo: Vincent Wildlife TrustVincent Wildlife Trust

Volunteering and Community Engagement Officer

Do you have a demonstrable commitment to volunteer and community engagement and a passion for mammal conservation?

Vincent Wildlife Trust, a national charity working to deliver significant change to the fortunes of threatened mammals, is offering an opportunity for someone experienced in working both with volunteers in a conservation setting and with local community groups and stakeholders. You will need to bring to the table a combination of proven capabilities in these fields.

Your primary purpose will be to drive forward our volunteer programme, building on existing success, and undertake effective communication activities as part of VWT’s awareness raising and public/stakeholder engagement programme.

In return, the Trust offers a quality employment package, the chance for training and professional development and the learning of new skills and experiences.

This is a permanent, full-time role based near Ledbury in Herefordshire.

For a Job Application Pack, please visit our website: www.vwt.org.uk
Interviews will be held on 3 or 4 August, either in person or via video conferencing.

Closing date for applications: 17:00 on 24 July 2020


Logo: Lulworth EstateLulworth Estate

Visitor Services Manager

A Visitor Services Manager with extensive experience of car parking is required at our three very popular locations on the Lulworth Estate. This includes the most visited spot on the magnificent Jurassic Coast. The area is popular with a wide range of holiday makers, all of whom share a love of this idyllic, unspoilt coastline and countryside. This role requires a manager who can ensure that the visitor experience and car parking is welcoming, efficient and pleasant.

Experience of managing a busy car park is essential, as are strong problem solving skills; a track record of successful project management; excellent leadership and a can do attitude. The successful candidate will be responsible car parks for ensuring the ongoing efficiency, profitability and safety of our car parks. They will also take responsibility for the management of related activities such as litter control, waste management and patrols in a wider area.

Long hours will be expected in the summer but this can be balanced with time off in the winter. Salary will be competitive, according to experience.

Application by CV with a covering letter to sue.raywood@lulworth.com or call Sue to find out more: 01929 400 352


Logo: Woodmeadow TrustWoodmeadow Trust

Woodmeadow Officer

Woodmeadow Trust is a pioneering charity taking practical action for nature and people by creating woodmeadow habitat and inspiring others to plant and look after these exceptional ecosystems. This will help our threatened native wildlife recover and allow people greater and easier access to the joy and beauty of nature. The charity has established Three Hagges Woodmeadow near York as an exemplar woodmeadow ecosystem for the benefit of research and public engagement. We now aim to increase the impact of our approach by extending the Woodmeadow Initiative throughout the UK, further developing and disseminating our replicable methodology.
We are looking for an experienced person capable of advocacy as well as practical habitat creation in the field. You will influence current and potential stakeholders and develop our approach to biodiverse habitat creation, designing and establishing new woodmeadows across our region and further afield. This is an exciting opportunity to grow our ground-breaking and newly funded Woodmeadow Initiative across a range of environments and sectors. The position is offered as a three-year contract, with a six-month probation period. Whilst you will have the flexibility to work from home, you should expect to work regularly at Three Hagges Woodmeadow, Escrick, near York.
Please read full job description before applying for this position click here 
Please apply with curriculum vitae setting out details of your qualifications and experience to date. Please ensure there are no unexplained gaps in your work experience. Your CV must be accompanied by a letter of application (no more than two sides of A4) setting out the qualities you feel you can bring to the job role and how you meet the requirements of the person specification.

Applications should be sent by e-mail to: emma@woodmeadowtrust.org.uk

Informal enquiries can be made to Rosalind Forbes Adam on 07976 821903.

Closing date for applications is 5.00pm, 31th July 2020.

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed on 17th August 2020.

 


Apprenticeships, Interns and paid trainee roles.

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Logo: The Heart of England ForestThe Heart of England Forest

Forestry Intern

The Heart of England Forest is an exciting and ambitious charity working hard to create a huge new woodland in the heart of the country that will benefit people and wildlife for generations to come. Already the largest new native broadleaf woodland in the country, we take our mission very seriously; it has never been more important to invest in our natural environment. Planting trees and creating new woodlands is no longer just a positive ambition for the country, it’s absolutely essential. It is the simplest solution to help mitigate climate change and create new green spaces that can help reconnect people and communities with nature and the natural environment.

Our goal is to reach 30,000 acres of semi contiguous forest by planting 13 million native broadleaf trees. To date we have planted more than 1.8 million trees. The significance and scale of our work cannot be underestimated: The Heart of England Forest - already the largest new native forest in the country – will become one of the largest forests in the UK.

Not only is our Forest expanding, so, to, is our team. If you share our ambition, we have a number of exciting opportunities for you to join us. The charity is a rewarding place to work and offers its staff a number of benefits.

Please visit www.heartofenglandforest.com/get-involved/jobs/ to download a job description / person specification and an application form. Please note that CVs will not be accepted in lieu of a completed application form.

Forestry Intern - Salary £19,344 p/a plus benefits

Fixed term contract – 1 year

This training role is ideal for a budding forester early in their career wishing to develop a wide range of forestry skills, experience and competencies for career progression. Ideally suited for someone starting or changing to a career in forestry as no experience is necessary, but a clear need and commitment to the environment must be demonstrated. This is a unique role which will give the successful candidate an opportunity to grow and shape England’s largest new native broadleaf woodland, whilst gaining practical experience on the job.

In this role you will work with and be supported by our forestry team to deliver operational plans to ensure that the Heart of England Forest achieves the aims and objectives set out in its strategic plan. This will include practical forestry planting and maintenance working with the staff team, volunteers, corporate supporters and contractors to achieve our vision of a 30,000-acre contiguous woodland.

As well as gaining skills in practical forestry focused mainly on woodland establishment you will be involved in widening public access and encouraging people and wildlife. You will also be supported to undertake your own specialist project across the duration of the internship, and evidence gathered as part of the project delivery can then be used to form a portfolio in order to demonstrate skills and experience gained throughout the internship.

We are looking for an enthusiastic individual who is keen to learn and has a “can do” attitude, who will be a passionate ambassador for the charity.

Closing date: Sunday 9th August

Interview date: Tuesday 25th August or Wednesday 26th August


Logo: North York Moors National Park AuthorityNorth York Moors National Park Authority

Countryside Worker Apprentice

 Based in either Castleton or Helmsley

North York Moors National Park and the North Yorkshire Moors Railway are working together to offer fantastic apprenticeship opportunities thanks to the National Heritage Lottery Fund.

This is a great chance for you to develop practical countryside skills, working as part of a team, alongside the railway and in the rest of the National Park. You will need to:

   ●   enjoy working outside (in all weathers!);   ●   have the ability to learn practical skills;   ●   want to do a Level 2 qualification in Environmental Conservation   ●   enjoy working outside and want to learn practical skills   ●   be really interested in countryside issues and want to help with the work of the NYMR and the National Park.
The apprenticeship is for an initial period of 2 years and you’ll be working alongside our experienced staff who are looking forward to sharing their skills with you. If you think that you fit the bill, we’d love to hear from you.

You will be paid a training allowance of £9,539 in year 1 and this will increase considerably as you go into year two.

Application forms and further details can be obtained by looking at the Job Opportunities page on our website.

Closing Date: 9.00 am on Friday 24 July 2020

Interviews are to be held on Wednesday 5 August 2020

 


 

 

Volunteers.

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Volunteers: see all the volunteers information online at: https://www.countryside-jobs.com/volunteers/intro

 

 

Still very quiet on the volunteering front. But we are getting some enquiries so now would be a good time to ensure you have a listing on the Volunteers Directory, a simple description about your organisation and the types of volunteering you (normally) offer can be added free here See what's already listed here.


Advertise your voluntary roles with CJS - it's free! Click here.

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CJS Announcements and articles of interest.

 

CJS Silver Anniversary logo 1994-2019

What a year it's been!

In January 2019 we excitedly entered our silver anniversary year announcing a change in logo for the special year and giving a brief history of CJS over the years; we also started giving away 'birthday presents' to our lovely readers. As CJS's many friends and colleagues began to send us birthday greetings we happily shared those too. We've always counted the first edition in July as 'our birthday' edition as the very first Countryside Jobs Service was printed and sent out to readers on 1 July 1994, although being a print edition by first class post most were actually received on Monday 4 July and last July I wrote a 'how to build a CJS Team' post explaining how we all came to be here and then Niall added some thoughts. You can read all our anniversary articles and birthday wishes on this page which will remain online as part of archive. Due to many inevitable delays our wonderful new website wasn't ready for launch until the end of the year but we think it was worth the wait. The official 25th birthday in July also saw the launch of our Photography Competition and I should be announcing the winners in this edition - but a global pandemic put paid to that! As I'm sure you'll agree the last few months have been a rollercoaster. The official lockdown in March caused an immediate upheaval with a virtual

working from home image (laptop on a table)

cessation in recruitment advertising, we hastily built a Volunteering From Home page on the website and for many weeks it was the most viewed section (here). We collated resources from many different organisations and posted links to their information hubs as well; all whilst getting to grips with working remotely. As remote and home working looks to be part of the 'new normal' we have also built a working from home page section for the main CJS Online section here. Coronavirus also put a dampener on our planned developments for this year which are slowly surfacing again. The review of subscription rates planned for March didn't happen until April but when it did we were delighted to be able to reduce them to an all time low of just 60p per week and when the following week the Chancellor took the VAT off digital publications we hit our target of 50p per week. Instead of holding the announcement until now as a 26th birthday present we decided to make the change immediately.

path through a field

Another major development which was slow to mature was the creation of an index of every organisation that has content on the website: that's jobs, training, features, news, volunteers; we've been busily tagging them all and the web designer built a new section so you can browse through and see what organisations have to offer and share. With 1838 (at time of writing) and growing every week it's a monster task but although they might not all have their logos and website links added yet you can have a browse through here in theory only organisations with anything current should be on the list but apologies if one or two have slipped through! This also means that we've been able to add links to further content from organisations or on similar subjects to every feature article which should allow you to explore the website more easily and find the information you want.

At the start of June we relaunched the photography competition for a further two months of submission with lockdown-friendly suggested themes and you'll get a chance to pick your favourite in August with the Reader's Choice selection. We will now be announcing the winners in September.

We've increased our features output although one Focus edition was dropped from this year's schedule and later this month will ask you for your suggestions and which sort of features you're enjoying and want to see more of. The coronavirus outbreak has affected us all and in recognition of how particularly hard hit our new graduates are we've given them a gift of a year's free subscription to CJS Weekly (sign up here) The CJS Team has (more or less!) adjusted to working from home, although the office dogs are missing their extra pats and ear scratches, we are looking at new flexible working arrangements for the team when 'it's' all over'.

Even a round, spikey virus can't keep CJS down for long and we have one or two new developments to come before our next birthday. So here's to many more and as one reader said last year: " Great service and keep it going for your 'Golden Jubilee' !".

 


 

logo: CJS Photography competitionIt's the last month for entries in our Photography Competition and the suggested theme is Hidden Gems and the prize is a bundle of goodies from The Mammal Society and others. 

Hidden Gems is another theme open to interpretation,  you might chose something ephemeral and only seen occasionally like this spiders web which you can only see clearly because of the way the light caught it first thing in the morning whilst covered in dew.  Perhaps you'll think of a gateway to a secret garden, if could be something hiding in the undergrowth, hiding under leaves or carefully camouflaged from view.  There again it might be your favourite landscape that's not well known, a view that makes your heart sing every time you see it. The choice is yours and we wait to see what you'll pick.

 

The bundle consists of a bag, pen and badge from our featured charity The Mammal Society plus a handbook from RSPB and wooden rulers from CIEEM

 

Entries
Simply email your photo (jpegs please) to photo@countryside-jobs.com along with your name and any information you want to include about your photo: what it shows, where it was taken and a caption for a funny one would be welcome too - and this month remember to include your job title. If you'd like us to tag you (or site / project) if we share your photo to social media please include the relevant handles and details.  You can enter as many photos as you like, but each image may only be entered once.

Full rules are here - please read them before sending your photos, we'll assume you have. All the information about the competition can be found here: c-js.uk/CJSPhoto

 

Please bear in mind at all times that your health, and the health of those around you, is more important than any photograph and you should not do anything to put it at risk.

 

June Photography Competition winner

Having relaunched the competition in June after pausing for a few months due to the exceptional circumstances brought about by the coronavirus pandemic we changed the remaining themes to make them more appropriate to the current climate on living with coronavirus, lockdown and the 'new normal'.

Lone Dine by Adrian Button (young robin sitting on a bird feeder)The June theme was From my Window.  We all agreed that this month was the most difficult choice yet, you sent us some amazing photos. From a shortlist of six we managed to whittle it down to three and then ended up taking a vote which was narrowly won by this lovely photo of a young robin waiting patiently for its turn on the fat feeder which the photographer Adrian Button tells us is just out of shot.  Sub Ed Tracey sums up our deliberations: "Just been reconsidering the photos to see if I still come to the same conclusion as I did last night and I do.  I kept looking at them and changing my mind!  But my favourite is the young robin diner.  Every time I looked I liked it better.  I think it's the way the bird stands out, framed by colour, especially the contrast of the brightness of its eye."

 

Congratulations to Adrian who has won a beepot planter from Green&Blue - now he can house bumblebees and other beneficial insects to help the wildlife in his garden.

Reminder that July is the final month for entries and the theme is Hidden Gems with a bundle of prizes from our featured Charity the Mammal Society plus others.

 

Full size image is on our website.

 

·         Find out more about the competition

·         View the Gallery of Winners

·         Follow us on Instagram for news of the competition and see some of the entries

 

Please bear in mind at all times that your health, and the health of those around you, is more important than any photograph and you should not do anything to put it at risk.


 

logo: Open UniversityGraduate and undergraduate talent is always just around the corner with The Open University

By J. Renshaw

 

The last few months have been tough for most organisations across the country, and it has shown just how vital it is for the graduate labour market to be flexible and able to adapt. Luckily, with The Open University, your next talented recruit is always just around the corner.

 

The Open University Employer Engagement team’s motto is “diverse talent everywhere”. The OU has 170,000 students across the country, and we’re the only university guaranteed to have students in every region of the UK. As recent studies from graduate labour market experts show, graduates more often than not end up working in an entirely different location to the university in which they studied. If you want to foster undergraduate and graduate talent guaranteed to be available in your local area, the OU is what you’re looking for. We’re everyone’s local university.

 

One of the best ways to foster a relationship with undergraduate talent is to hire an intern. Internships come in all shapes and sizes and can help inject extra energy and perspectives into your organisation. Our experienced staff can help you set up a meaningful internship, and you may be eligible to receive funding for your internship from Santander. This internship programme supports small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) to engage students on placements that last 4-8 weeks full-time or the equivalent part-time.

 

Of course, your employees don’t necessarily need to be within a commutable distance of your workplace... Our well-established Virtual Internship programme has attracted a lot of attention in recent months, as employers and universities alike strive to provide socially-distanced, online working opportunities. Hosting a Virtual Internship can open you up to the entire breadth of Open University talent, can be more flexible for both you and the student, and doesn’t require valuable office space or IT equipment.

 

It takes a lot to be an OU student. When you hire an OU student or graduate into a job or internship, you’re hiring someone who has the resilience, determination, and time-management it takes to complete remote, part-time study on top of work and family commitments. There is no typical OU student. People of all ages and backgrounds study with us, for all sorts of reasons – to update their skills, get a qualification or to start, boost or change their career direction.

 

Working with The Open University is scalable, and free of charge. Some organisations will solely make use of our online vacancy portal OpportunityHub, while others will work more closely with us on careers fairs, forums, and Insight Visits. All the organisations we work with are valued.

 

If you would like to find out more about working with The Open University, please don’t hesitate to email us at careers-service-employers@open.ac.uk


We know times are tough for everyone right now so CJS want to give every graduating student a graduation gift of a year's subscription to CJS Weekly. 

All our graduating students who should be celebrating the end of three (or more) years hard work to gain their diplomas and degrees are having to do so in isolation with virtual graduation ceremonies if any at all. They are leaving the world of academia behind and heading off to start their careers looking at a more uncertain future than any of us can imagine. It's a hard enough time setting out looking for your first 'real' job in a profession that you hope is going to sustain you, body and soul, for the rest of your working life and we all know how difficult it is in the countryside and conservation sectors at any time. To help our next generation of rangers, ecologists, wildlife warriors, landscape managers and environmental educators CJS wants to give each of the class of 2020 a graduation present of a full year's subscription to CJS Weekly. More information and sign up here


Logo: National Biodiversity NetworkNominations for NBN Awards for Wildlife Recording 2020 will close in justa few short weeks on 26 July.

Building on the success of the previous five years, the National Biodiversity Network Trust (NBN Trust) is launching the 2020 NBN Awards for Wildlife Recording.

Developed in partnership with the National Forum for Biological Recording and the Biological Records Centre in 2015, these annual Awards recognise and celebrate the outstanding contributions made by individuals and groups to wildlife recording – which is helping to improve our understanding of the natural world within the UK and enabling evidence-based environmental decision making.

These contributions can include anything from the number of records made by an individual or group, the number of records openly shared on the NBN Atlas or other systems, the number of participants at a BioBlitz and the quantity of data generated, plugging of gaps in knowledge in a specific area of the UK, technical innovation in recording wildlife or encouraging participation through the development of apps or games etc.

There are five categories of awards:

Nominating someone for an award couldn’t be simpler, you can even nominate yourself! Just visit: bit.ly/NBNawards20 and complete the appropriate Awards nomination form either online or email the edited MS Word document back to support@nbn.org.uk by 26 July 2020.


 

Having paused the Focus editions for this year we're increasing the number of features and in depth articles we publish. And we're asking you what information would you like to see in CJS?

We commission a range of articles and features according to what we find interesting and think you, the reader, might enjoy and find useful.  However, you might have noticed that we've also started including small snippets about life at CJS and some photos. The interactions with the posts give us a vague idea of what you like to see but now's your chance to tell us so that we can be sure to look for the right content for you.  These features are shared in our publications, across our social media streams and included in the daily email.

If you'd like to contribute a piece find out how to do that here.

Let us know what you'd like to see by ticking a box or two on this form here: https://www.countryside-jobs.com/survey/what-content it will take seconds and enhance your reading for months to come!


 

As I'm sure you can imagine CJS is receiving many enquiries about changing careers and working in the countryside / outdoors / with animals. The Covid-19 lockdown has made many of us reassess our lives and to consider major changes which previously would have been too great of an upheaval. Whilst much of the advice we give had not altered, certain aspects, such as suggesting weekend volunteering and workdays, are, of course, not currently possible. Therefore, we want to gather as much of that information in one place to make it easier for potential career changers to understand what's really involved in the newly picked "dream job". We're asking if you would complete a job profile questionnaire about your working life, we'll publish what we receive*; you can choose to be identified on the published profile or to remain anonymous.

   

Whilst CJS doesn’t want to turn away any genuine potential countryside workers we do want people to know it's not all sunshine and roses and in so doing perhaps help organisations from receiving speculative enquiries and make sure the recruiter's task is made easier by ensuring they receive only relevant applications from suitable candidates who have done their homework and know exactly what it is they're looking at and applying for.

 

If you would like to help us out and send us details of your job please download the word document questionnaire from here.  Any questions please contact Kerryn on kerryn@countryside-jobs.com, this is also where to send your completed questionnaire.

 

We're looking for any and all countryside jobs, ranger to reception, ecologists to educators and all points in between.

   

*We may edit for content and reserve the right not to publish.

 

Features and In Depth Articles.

 

 

Furlonteer.com: the new non-profit project connecting furloughed employees with the charities and good causes who need it most

Logo: Furlonteer
Stella Norris (Furlonteer.com)
Stella Norris (Furlonteer.com)

Furlonteer.com is a brand new, organically-grown community initiative aiming to connect people on furlough with remote volunteer opportunities for charities and good causes. With seven in ten UK firms having furloughed staff and the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme recently extended to the end of October, Furlonteer.com is rapidly gaining traction. The initiative received over 1,000 sign-ups in the first 48 hours and over 50 charities have been matched with ‘furlonteers’ over the past week. Today it has grown to more than 5,000 volunteers and over 500 charities.

Organisations helping animals and wildlife are among the top charity preferences of volunteers who have signed up, and while most roles are remote, Furlonteer is placing volunteers with a range of charities helping these causes including Every One of Us, promoting action for the environment for people with busy lives and educating about climate change, The Irish Horse Welfare Trust, rescuing and rehoming neglected horses and ponies in Ireland, Stour Valley Dog Rescue, Our Only World, inspiring and raising awareness of our fight against marine plastic pollution and Springwood Mindfulness Sanctuary, a vegan horse sanctuary that encourages visitors to appreciate nature.

‘Furlonteers’ are matched with volunteer roles for charities based on criteria such as their skills, experience and amount of time they have available, which can range from a few hours a month to several hours a day, the majority based from their homes. Remote roles include anything from digital marketing, fundraising and IT to bookkeeping, HR and business development, with other ‘in person’ roles involving helping out outdoors.

Adam Barton (Furlonteer.com)
Adam Barton (Furlonteer.com)

In addition, Furlonteer.com has partnered with Champion Health to support wellbeing in offering free online mental health training to those who register.

The initiative was conceptualised over a lockdown takeaway curry on Zoom between Hamish Shephard, co-founder of Hello Fresh and founder of Bridebook, Rosie Shephard, founder of the Luxury Communications Council and Sam Tasker- Grindley, Director at accounting firm RSM UK.

Sam says, “Furlonteer.com was born from a simple idea: we realised that so many causes need help, while at this time so many people want to help them, and have time to do so. We decided to bring them together.

The novelty of being furloughed has worn off for many, and we’ve had an incredible response so far with a huge number of skilled and talented people willing to volunteer, either in charities or to help create the Furlonteer.com team.

Using digital platforms like Zoom, it’s amazing to see a group of strangers in lockdown with a common passion coming together, combining their expertise to create a movement like Furlonteer.com within days. We’re growing and excited to see what the future holds, both for Furlonteer.com and for the charities we’re able to help”

Visit furlonteer.com for more information or to register to be a furlonteer or as a charity or cause. Alternatively, follow @furlonteer on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.

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Go Jauntly launches smartphone ‘nature diary’ to boost mental health

Logo: Go Jauntly

A free smartphone-based ‘nature prescription’ for mental health developed by the team behind the popular walking app Go Jauntly along with researchers at the University of Derby has been launched.

Go Jauntly Nature Notes

The Nature Notes feature has been integrated in the Go Jauntly iOS app, which also enables its users to discover, create and share walking routes. By using Nature Notes, users can now record the good things that they notice in nature.

Photo by Go Jauntly
Photo by Go Jauntly

Nature Notes was developed as part of the £1.3m Improving Wellbeing Through Urban Nature project. Studies led by the University of Derby’s Nature Connectedness Research Group (NCRG) found that using a smartphone app to prompt people to notice the good things in urban nature not only increased their connection with nature, but brought key wellbeing benefits to users.

Crucially, the research found it brought clinically significant improvements in quality of life for people living with a mental health difficulty.

The NCRG was the first dedicated research centre to be established to examine the relationship between humans and the rest of the natural world, and has developed some of the first interventions to bring about sustained increases in nature connectedness, enhanced wellbeing, and changes in conservation behaviours.

Photo by Go Jauntly
Photo by Go Jauntly

Miles Richardson, Professor of Human Factors and Nature Connectedness at the University of Derby, said: “We are delighted to have teamed up with Go Jauntly to provide the Nature Notes feature. At a time when mental health is being tested by the lockdown, but we still have access to nature, it could provide a helping hand for many people.

“Our research shows the importance of noticing the simple things in nature for wellbeing, particularly for those who are less connected and don’t spend much time outdoors. Making use of the ever-present smartphone to prompt people to engage with nature is a great way to encourage people to take a moment to look after their mental health and wellbeing.

Photo by Go Jauntly
Photo by Go Jauntly

“We hope it will motivate more people to notice the good things in nature, and, by doing so, experience the positive psychological impact and the lasting connection that those simple interactions can generate, in conjunction with the physical benefit of walking. It also provides a useful tool to help organisations which manage urban green spaces to make the most of those areas for people who live near them.”

Hana Sutch, co-founder and CEO at Go Jauntly, said: “We’re so pleased to be able to launch the new Go Jauntly feature, Nature Notes, with the University of Derby. Research into this area has really accelerated in the last 10 years, in part due to the mental health crisis. Now more than ever, we're all experiencing the real link between contact with nature and our mental health. We hope that through familiar technology, Nature Notes can help us all appreciate the positive moments, no matter how small, and ultimately improve our wellbeing”.

Go Jauntly is available to download on the App Store and the Play Store. The new Nature Notes feature is available on iOS and is coming soon to Android. More information about the app can be found here: https://www.gojauntly.com/

To find out more about the work of the Nature Connectedness Research Group, visit the University of Derby website.

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Coping in the Countryside Post Lockdown

Logo: Holkham
Holkham's dunes (Andy Bloomfield)
Holkham's dunes (Andy Bloomfield)

2020 will undoubtedly go down as one of the most dramatic years our country has faced probably since the Second World War. A World-wide pandemic and the catastrophe of thousands of deaths here in the UK, dealing with a forced Lockdown for those fortunate enough to stay virus free, alongside all manner of civil unrest; sometimes it didn’t feel it could get much worse. Out in the countryside it seemed different, a slight cause for celebration almost. In many instances it was like nature sighed with relief. The sun shone relentlessly, the skies, normally like a cross stitch of vapour trails, were painted only with ever changing cloud formations. Just as nature intended as air traffic all but disappeared. The pronounced lines between man-made and enforced urbanisation alongside the natural world became blurred. Birds, plants and animals started to move more freely, establishing themselves where previously they had been unable to colonize. Nature started to spill over the boundaries from where it had been banished.

One evening's litter - should the sign say - or leave for someone else to collect????? (James Cowan)
One evening's litter - should the sign say - or leave for someone else to collect????? (James Cowan)

Post Lockdown we find ourselves in yet another different world. The countryside is open to all and everyone wants a piece of it. Being locked up and told not to travel is something few in this country have ever experienced and now seems the time to get out there, enjoy the open spaces, flock to the beaches, explore those green lanes and take in all that fresh air. It is good for the soul without question. And this is where the population has become divided. For those that work in the countryside, be they farmers, wardens, rangers, game keepers or simply those that just care, have had to face another seemingly country wide pandemic that for many of us is even more apparent than the results of the often fatal coronavirus. Rubbish: litter from day trippers on a scale that again most of us would have deemed unimaginable, has become the norm. It shows a total disregard and lack of care and respect for the beautiful places large numbers of people are now descending upon.

The rare sight these days of a Ringed Plover with a chick (Andy Bloomfield)
The rare sight these days of a Ringed Plover with a chick (Andy Bloomfield)

Amidst the horror of all the discarded trash, there are fire sites and barbeques in abundance. The results in such a hot period of drought have been inevitable - beauty spots and nature reserves ravaged by fire. Totally unacceptable surely? On top of this, anarchic car parking has taken hold, creating accidents on narrow roads and denying our precious emergency services access. These services are themselves overstretched with first time visitors, desperate to visit the last wilderness areas that are frequently romanticised in the media without highlighting the dangers. Tidal salt marshes and offshore sand bars are as dangerous as ever and this has been proven with ever more frequency since lockdown, with lifeboats and coastguards taking the brunt of it. Everyone is desperate to get to the great outdoors regardless of the consequences. Wild camping has surged with fires and rubbish again going hand in hand. Nesting bird enclosures, vital in giving ground nesting birds such as Terns and Ringed Plovers a chance at survival, are blatantly ignored. Where nature started to spill over, it is now being pushed back further than where it started. For those of us that work in the countryside it has now become the norm for most of our days to be taken up with clearing up, trying to maintain the beauty all come to enjoy. The answer has got to be greater widespread education from an early age. Remember Keep Britain Tidy? Those of us old enough will and that mantra from back in the 70s stuck. So, let us start again! Let’s ban instant barbeques, let’s get the Government debating the ravages of the countryside. Signage and interpretation are all well and good but often only those concerned will read and comply, the perpetrators of this new epidemic of environmental stupidity do not.

The subtle beauty of Holkham NNR with Matted Sea Lavender (Andy Bloomfield)
The subtle beauty of Holkham NNR with Matted Sea Lavender (Andy Bloomfield)

Here at Holkham we have suffered more so than in the past and in a small window of time, making it seem all the worse, but certainly not to the degree of sites on the south coast. The cleaning up of Holkham beach and dunes has been constant, wardening has been essential to guard nesting colonies of Little Terns and prevent fire. We have already seen egg and chick losses of Ringed Plovers and Oystercatchers due to dog and people disturbance, although others have simply sat it out, saved by the few extra metres of safety our simple enclosures offer. One particular day I spent several hours with my faith in humanity lost as I watched dogs chasing Oystercatchers, collecting a truck of discarded litter and turning away illegal wild campers. Yet in doing my duties I marvelled at the abundance of Matted Sea lavender and Sea Bindweed (both subtle coastal plants of North Norfolk) as chunky Dune Chafer beetles courted amongst the marram grass. A Hobby flashed by overhead sending the Little Tern colony noisily skyward for a brief moment before they returned to their precious eggs. It instantly restored my faith and mental state. Nature soothes the soul and sights such as these are sometimes all that are required. It’s what makes us want to work in conservation and continue to fight a sometimes fraught battle in maintaining a countryside where nature can still thrive.

Andy Bloomfield, Senior Warden, Holkham NNR

This is a follow up article to  Holkham National Nature Reserve – Changing Times during the Covid 19 Pandemic published in April 2020

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National Meadows Day: Why saving and protecting wild flower meadows can help deliver a green recovery

Logo: Plantlife

By Ian Dunn, Plantlife Chief Executive

Meadow in north Wales © Matt Pitt
Meadow in north Wales © Matt Pitt

Although it seems a very long time ago, in 1984 my first job after graduation was as a team leader with a job scheme established to help minor repeat offenders re-enter the workforce through taking on environmental work. Responsible for a small team, we spent six months planting trees, clearing streams of debris and loading fly-tipped tyres in their hundreds into skips. We undertook manual jobs that today would need a plethora of health and safety sign-offs but we were outside and contributing.

It is so far back in time that I can no longer recall the scheme name but it was local council run and had a truly amazing impact. Besides the satisfaction of a cleared, free-flowing stream or a tyre-free layby, by the end of the contract all three of my team had jobs to go to and were on their way again to long term employment.

This tiny, local scheme I was involved in in 1984 acts as a memory jolt to what we were once doing and how we might do so again. Although small and local it was impactful for the environment and for those it employed – simply put – it offered green employment.

There are plenty of conversations about ‘tipping points, or bifurcations’ but it is clear, whatever we call it, that as a society we need to take a new road. I believe we need a nation-wide focus on nature, supported by a ‘Marshall Plan’ on green recovery, green jobs and nature based solutions. I’m not just talking of lots of small schemes like the one I was involved in all those years ago, but a broad, well-funded, government-backed job supporting programme to make lasting change; change in the health of nature, health of people and equal access to gainful employment and development.

Meadow in Wiltshire Photo credit: James King
Meadow in Wiltshire Photo credit: James King

Plantlife is one of a national partnership of organisations calling for a National Nature Service as part of the government’s response to the pandemic. The challenges we face today are unquestionably on a scale that can be daunting. As a consequence of Covid-19, we have both a major health problem and a major economic one to contend with. The health problem goes far beyond the lives lost and includes those who have lost loved ones and had life changing health interventions delayed of postponed. The mental health crisis and the additional deaths this year say it all. Economically, experts advise we are heading towards an unemployment rate of between 10-15% and a debt larger than our entire annual GDP. Our Government is not coming out of this crisis covered in glory. Challenges enough? Now place this on top of the growing climate change challenge, the increasing loss of biodiversity, broad ranging social inequality, progressive degradation of oceans and soils, plastics infiltrating all areas of our planetary systems and desertification alongside the loss of tropical rainforests at an unprecedented scale – and you have a rather compelling call to action.

It was hugely disappointing therefore that from a £5 billion ‘ambitious’ new funding deal announced by the Prime Minister on June 30th less that 0.01 percent is dedicated to nature. That is less than zero point zero one percent! Are memories of how important nature was to us all during the worst of shutdown so short? Contrary to suggestions, this is the complete opposite of being ambitious – it is rehash of old policies and old ways and will further contribute to climatic, environmental and nature degradation. It is simply not good enough.

Crested cow-wheat © Tim Pankhurst
Crested cow-wheat © Tim Pankhurst

We are therefore calling for Government to invest in a scheme that will create tens of thousands of jobs, improve the health of nature, people and the planet, and contribute to a green, sustainable recovery. That is to build, build, build a green economy.

We have so much we must do and we need a work force to do it: we must make our open spaces wilder with greater biodiversity; we must mitigate and hold back the impact of climate change through holistic and effective nature based-solutions: flood management, soil regeneration, healthy food systems, we must insulate our houses and accelerate the reduction of emissions; not just carbon but nitrogen, methane, water vapour. Where we can, we should be capturing carbon and looking at sensible geoengineering, we need a step change in financial markets and ethical investment; the list is endless.

The National Nature Service is a scheme that finally recognises nature at the heart of all aspects of our economy and therefore at the heart of all aspects of employment. It would fund extensive training across schools, colleges, universities, short-term courses and all aspects of adult education. It would support employers with funds directly leading to nature facing jobs. It would measure and deliver tangible benefits to the natural world we love and rely upon.

The restoration and creation of wildflower meadows can act as a central plank of the green recovery we need. A staggering 97% of British wildflower meadows have been eradicated in less than a century and species-rich grassland now covers less than 1% of the UK. This devastation of meadows, and loss of wild flowers like wild strawberry, ragged robin and harebell, is driving disastrous declines in our bee and butterfly populations. The remaining isolated fragments of meadows that have survived the bulldozer or the plough are home to an unprecedented richness of plant species that have evolved over millennia and they must be better protected under law. But protection of existing meadows alone is not enough. In addition to making forests and we must make more meadows for the myriad of benefits they bring including biodiversity, carbon storage, flood prevention, and water purification. They can be a cornerstone of the green recovery; building back better for nature while stimulating a boom in skilled jobs in the rural economy. Creating new and healthy grassland habitats also means creating homes for a fifth of all priority species requiring active conservation.

Plantlife has a great deal of expertise in the practical restoration of native wildflower meadows and pasture. Working in partnership with farmers, communities, Councils and local businesses, there is tried, tested and costed model ready to be rolled out across the UK. To achieve this there needs to be a scaling up of the harvesting, growing and use of native wildflower seed. There also needs to be a scaling up of contractors with the right skills who can carry out this work and deliver restoration and seeding of wildflower meadows. Once restored wildflower meadow management will contribute towards larger scale provision of high-quality grass-fed livestock production, and permanent pollinator habitat beneficial for crops and wildlife. All these will support skilled new jobs in the rural economy.

This Saturday, Plantlife is helping everyone celebrate the magic of meadows even if they are not able to physically get to one this year. The #NationalMeadowsDay online celebration will demonstrate the value and vulnerability of meadows and also provide an uplifting summer experience after months of lockdown. In these strange and challenging times there is more need than ever for increased connectedness to nature and that is why Plantlife will be sharing the sights and sounds of a meadow in all their glory this Saturday. Please tune in and share and show the love for these special, vulnerable habitats that can act as an engine room for economic and societal recovery.

You can stay up to date on the campaign to save our magnificent but vanishing meadows at www.Plantlife.org.uk / https://twitter.com/Love_plants / https://www.facebook.com/LovePlantlife/

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CJS Focus The most recent edition: Environmental Education and Outdoor Activities

view the most recent edition here or download a pdf copy.

The next edition will be published on 12 November

And is looking at: Ecology and Biodiversity BUT is dependent on the ongoing coronoavirus outbreak and lockdown situation

 

 


News.

We collate together news from across the internet; sent out in real time via twitter and each day we pick a handful of stories of interest which are included on the Headlines page, the daily email update and here grouped according to subject.

 

Click on the headline to read more.

 

Green Recovery.

New research reveals huge public support for putting nature at the heart of Coronavirus recovery plans - RSPB

RSPB calls on England's City and Metro Mayors to lead green recovery from Covid-19, as new survey shows overwhelming public support for protecting and investing in nature

New figures released by the RSPB reveal

The RSPB has written to England’s City and Metro Mayors asking them to listen to the people and build back better by putting nature at the heart of their recovery plans.

The UK’s largest nature conservation organisation, the RSPB, today called on the elected leaders of England’s biggest cities and most populous metropolitan areas to listen to the public and put nature at the heart of plans for a green recovery from the Coronavirus crisis.

The letter to the country’s City and Metro Mayors accompanied the charity’s publication of a report on the results of a recent YouGov poll that asked people about their views on the importance of nature both during, and in our recovery from, the pandemic.

The report reveals that nature and access to natural greenspace have been seen as important for people’s health and wellbeing since the Coronavirus crisis began, and that there is overwhelming public support for protecting and investing in nature and increasing accessible natural greenspace as part of our recovery from Coronavirus.

It also points to inequalities in access to nature between those in the highest and lowest income households, and between households in urban and rural areas, suggesting the impact of the Coronavirus crisis has not fallen equally across society.

 

Scottish public want a less wasteful economy - Scottish Environment LINK

A Scottish Environment LINK survey published today shows the public want a less wasteful economy with lighter demands on the planet . These findings come at a critical time, with Governments now considering how best to stimulate the economy as part of the recovery from coronavirus.

The survey showed that respondents would support moves by the Scottish Government that reduce our use of valuable raw materials. People also expressed frustration with the way that products are made and how it is often impracticable to get things repaired.
There was widespread support for businesses to become more responsible for the environmental impact of their products, with clear support for supermarkets to report on their own waste levels and waste in their supply chains.

The survey of 1,027 people in Scotland, conducted by Survation, found

The Covid-19 crisis has shed light on the vulnerability of our wasteful and unsustainable economy, often characterised by long and ‘just-in-time’ supply chains. Prior to the recent abrupt downturn in economic activity, our economy was eating its way through the world’s natural resources at a rate that was both environmentally unsustainable and undesirable from an economic resilience point of view. Environmental experts say we need to re-programme our economy to extract less from the planet, reuse what we’ve already taken and reduce our waste.

 

Twenty-five thousand jobs could be created through government investment in a green recovery - Wildlife and Countryside Link

Investment in nature recovery could provide a major boost in employment in England and help create a more resilient economy as part of a green economic recovery from Covid-19 according to new figures put together by conservation groups. In addition, it would also help Government and society tackle the nature and climate crises.

A list of 330 projects that are ‘ready to go’ - including a mix of well-tested and innovative approaches, from micro forests to huge coastal realignment schemes - has been put together by Wildlife and Countryside Link to showcase the scale of opportunities available for England through a green recovery. In the short term, these projects could support around 5,000 jobs in the environment sector and 5,000 jobs in delivery, plus supply chain benefits.

Additionally, if the government delivers on its ambition in the 25-year plan for the environment of half a million hectares of restored habitat, this could mean a further 15,000 jobs in other similar projects. The scalability of many of the projects mean that they can be replicated in multiple locations to fit local needs.

Richard Benwell, Chief Executive of Wildlife and Countryside Link said, “Investing in nature can provide a short-term boost with thousands of jobs, and it can provide long-term, cost-effective protection against costly risks like flooding, soil degradation, and climate change. Helping the poorest, most nature-deprived communities first can help improve people’s way of life at the same time as helping wildlife. This is the Chancellor’s chance to grow back better by including funding for these projects in July’s budget announcement.”

Not only would these projects deliver much needed jobs in a post-Covid world, they would also provide a significant boost towards Government nature and climate targets by -

Read today's feature article by Ian Dunn, Plantlife Chief Executive: Why saving and protecting wild flower meadows can help deliver a green recovery

  

CJS is supporting a new #NationalNatureService -

Pledge your support for a National Nature Service to provide paid work for people to restore nature, and to help develop the skills and knowledge we need to create a healthier, greener economy. Show you support and sign the pledge here.

 

Government announces £40 million green jobs challenge fund - defra

A fund of up to £40 million will create jobs in nature recovery and conservation.

Plans to create thousands of new jobs to kick-start the nation’s green recovery from the coronavirus pandemic were unveiled by the government today.

The £40 million Green Recovery Challenge Fund will bring forward funding to help charities and environmental organisations start work on projects across England to restore nature and tackle climate change.

The fund will help conservation organisations and their suppliers create up to 3,000 jobs and safeguard up to 2,000 others in areas such as protecting species, finding nature-based solutions to tackling climate change, conservation rangers and connecting people with the outdoors.

The Green Recovery Challenge Fund will be funded by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs by bringing forward £10 million of money from the Nature Recovery Fund and £30 million of Nature for Climate Funding, so that the money can be spent now when it is most needed. [This is not new money, but previously announced funds made available sooner - Ed]

It is envisaged that the fund will create a broad range of short and long term jobs such as ecologists, surveyors, nature reserve staff and education workers in environment organisations; and support their suppliers in areas such as agricultural engineering, horticulture, and equipment and seed supply.

Organisations will be invited to bid to the fund and details will be set out in due course.

 

New species extinction target proposed for global nature rescue plan - University College London

The upcoming future strategy for conserving biodiversity must include a prominent target to lower extinction rates, according to group including UCL scientists.

Biodiversity loss has continued unabated at an alarming rate, and so far, action to deliver on the global agreements in place has failed to prevent further declines. Strong science-based action is needed, the scientists argue, driven through the recognition of a prominent biodiversity target, comparable to that of the two-degree climate target.

In proposals published today in the journal Science, conservation experts are suggesting a long-term goal to reduce species extinctions towards natural rates, with an easily measurable objective of fewer than 20 extinctions a year.

It would apply to all described species across the major taxonomic groups (fungi, plants, invertebrates and vertebrates) and ecosystem types, whether freshwater, marine or terrestrial.

Report co-author Professor Dame Georgina Mace (UCL Centre for Biodiversity & Environment Research) said: “There are many ways to record biodiversity loss but we argue here that extinction is special. Once a species has gone, it has gone forever, and with it goes all the exquisite adaptations and interactions that it has developed, often over millions of years.”

Much of the failure to make progress on existing biodiversity goals and targets can be attributed to a lack of mainstreaming of biodiversity in public policy, and limitations in raising the profile of species loss for politicians and the public. The post-2020 stage has become vital to define an agenda which offers solutions to biodiversity loss.

With the irreplaceable loss of a species being simple to assess and communicate, having this scientifically defensible prominent target will help to galvanise both policy and public support for nature, as well as continuing to support the overall goals of the CBD.

Professor Richard Gregory (UCL Centre for Biodiversity & Environment Research and RSPB) said: “We need a ‘North Star’ for nature. A bright, visible destination for global society to move towards so that we bend the curve of biodiversity loss from the top down, and bottom up, recovering species populations by protecting and restoring our vital ecosystems.”

 

Oxford to Cambridge Arc: a chance for housebuilding to support a green recovery by protecting and restoring nature - Woodland Trust

Some of the UK’s leading nature conservation charities have produced a blueprint for how plans for up to a million new homes can include nature to create happier and healthier communities for people and wildlife.
Nature must be at the heart of plans to build new houses. With plans starting to take shape to build up to a million new homes in what is known as the Oxford-Cambridge Arc, conservationists are asking the Government to look at this as the perfect opportunity to invest in nature, improve people’s lives and realise the green recovery by building the new nature friendly towns and communities everyone wants to see.

This year the importance of being able to get out into nature and discover wildlife where we live has become clear. This has been underlined by figures released last week by the RSPB that showed widespread public support for investing in and increasing nature and natural green space in our recovery from the coronavirus crisis.

To show how this could be done, the Wildlife Trust for Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire and Northamptonshire (WTBCN); Berkshire, Buckinghamshire and Oxfordshire Wildlife Trust (BBOWT); the RSPB and the Woodland Trust have jointly published a set of principles for protecting and restoring nature and tackling climate change as part of growth and development proposed for the Oxford-Cambridge Arc.

 

Pioneering Scottish partnership could be the model for global green recovery says global authority on innovation and sustainability - Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA)

Volans, a global think tank and strategic advisory firm founded by John Elkington, the originator of the ‘triple-bottom-line’ of profit, people and planet, and advisor to major companies across the globe, has called out a pioneering Scottish partnership as a potential model for global economic recovery.
The River Leven Programme, a regional regeneration partnership pioneered by the Scottish Environment Protection Agency, aims to transform an area once at the centre of Scotland’s industrial revolution, locking in sustainable, inclusive growth.

The Programme is the first living case study in Volans’ ‘Green Swan Observatory’, propelling the project to the global ‘one to watch’ list for innovative approaches.

“The alignment of environment and economic agencies with private partners to accelerate regeneration in Leven can be a model for Scotland’s green recovery,” says Elkington.

Comes as the Scottish Government’s Economic Advisory Group on Economic Recovery calls for “a strong green spine to… recovery.”

The announcement comes as five new partners - Network Rail, The Coal Authority, Zero Waste Scotland, Historic Environment Scotland, and Fife Coast & Countryside Trust - join another ten private and public partners on the one-year anniversary of the partnership.

 

Twenty-five thousand jobs could be created through government investment in a green recovery - RSPB

Investment in nature recovery could provide a major boost in employment in England and help create a more resilient economy as part of a green economic recovery from Covid-19 according to new figures put together by conservation groups. In addition, it would also help Government and society tackle the nature and climate crises.

A list of 330 projects that are ‘ready to go’ - including a mix of well-tested and innovative approaches, from micro forests to huge coastal realignment schemes - has been put together by Wildlife and Countryside Link to showcase the scale of opportunities available for England through a green recovery. In the short term, these projects could support around 5,000 jobs in the environment sector and 5,000 jobs in delivery, plus supply chain benefits.

Additionally, if the government delivers on its ambition in the 25-year plan for the environment of half a million hectares of restored habitat, this could mean a further 15,000 jobs in other similar projects. The scalability of many of the projects mean that they can be replicated in multiple locations to fit local needs.

Richard Benwell, Chief Executive of Wildlife and Countryside Link said, “Investing in nature can provide a short-term boost with thousands of jobs, and it can provide long-term, cost-effective protection against costly risks like flooding, soil degradation, and climate change. Helping the poorest, most nature-deprived communities first can help improve people’s way of life at the same time as helping wildlife. This is the Chancellor’s chance to grow back better by including funding for these projects in July’s budget announcement.”

 

The Parks Alliance publishes ‘Making Parks Count – The case for parks’ - The Parks Alliance

Saving the Health Service £2bn a year makes parks a smart investment for a Green Recovery

Today, The Parks Alliance (TPA) has published ‘Making Parks Count’ making the business case for parks, why they matter and why they are a ‘smart investment’. The case illustrates how parks in England deliver over £6.6bn of health, climate change and environmental benefits each year including £2.2bn in avoided health costs alone and worth £140 per year for each urban resident. For every £1 spent on parks in England an estimated £7 in additional value for health and wellbeing and the environment is generated. The case clearly demonstrates that parks are a smart investment. Unfortunately, because these returns have never been properly understood, parks have suffered from years of underfunding and there remain gross inequalities in access to quality green spaces across the country. Making Parks Count presents the case for turning this around.

During the COVID19 “lock down” parks were quite rightly championed by politicians and scientists as critical to people’s physical and mental wellbeing and people flocked to their local parks to take exercise, relax or just see their neighbours at a safe distance. Parks have always the most favoured community space[1] and the pandemic strengthened this relationship revealing a greater appreciation of their everyday benefits whilst for parks services and researchers it exposed their proven, and multiple, wellbeing benefits.

The government is committed to a post pandemic Green Recovery that is science-led, clean and resilient and will create employment in the industries of the future while ensuring we address the linked challenges of public health, climate change, and biodiversity[2]. Although finalised just before the pandemic struck ‘Making Parks Count’ underlines how parks are uniquely placed to tackle these 21st century challenges and provide a significant return for any investment made to kick start the economy post COVID19 or as part of a comprehensive Green Recovery.

   

Kick-start nature’s recovery and absorb a third of UK emissions - The Wildlife Trusts

Seahorse (C) Julie Hatcher
Seahorse (C) Julie Hatcher

New report from The Wildlife Trusts shows how investing in nature would reap big dividends in tackling climate crisis

Today The Wildlife Trusts publish a report ‘Let nature help – how nature’s recovery is essential for tackling the climate crisis’. Drawing on the latest research, the report shows how a variety of natural landscapes in the UK can store carbon and could absorb a third of UK emissions if these degraded habitats were to be expertly restored. It makes the case for addressing the climate and nature emergencies together, head on.

The Wildlife Trusts are calling on the Government, industry and local authorities to step-up investment in nature’s recovery and climate change mitigation by:

The Wildlife Trusts know from experience that restoring nature can help soak up UK emissions whilst also contributing many additional benefits. For example, better natural habitats reduce the risk of flooding, help prevent coastal erosion, improve people’s health and ensure thriving ecosystems which provide the pollinators, soils, food and water which sustain us. Nature is, itself, at risk from climate change – yet its potential to store carbon means it can help us address climate catastrophe.

 

Urgent revision of planned UK infrastructure projects needed now to achieve green recovery - Green Alliance

In a new report published today (29 June), the independent environmental think-tank Green Alliance sets out a vision for the UK’s economic recovery from the Covid-19 pandemic that puts people, climate and nature at its heart.
The publication, ‘Blueprint for a Resilient Economy’, includes new analysis of the latest government data showing that the UK’s infrastructure pipeline is incompatible with the Government’s long-term climate targets.

That data from the National Infrastructure and Construction Procurement Pipeline for 2020/21, published in June this year, shows over £8 billion worth of planned procurements in high carbon transport. The UK government is estimated to have spent £9 billion supporting new high carbon transport infrastructure since 2017 - and it has confirmed it will spend another £27 billion over the next five years on 4,000 miles of new roads - but even with the current 2035 phase-out date for petrol and diesel cars, we can’t shift to electric vehicles fast enough to meet our carbon budgets: we can’t afford further road expansion.
Similarly, since 2017 the government is estimated to have invested nearly £9bn to support new housing projects, with an additional £1.5 billion worth of investment to support housing projects expected this year. The scrapping of the zero-carbon homes standard in 2015 means most of these new homes are not net-zero compatible by default, locking in future costs and carbon.
We estimate there is a gap of £14.1 billion in annual public investment to 2023 in the new low carbon transport, buildings, natural capital and industry infrastructure required in the UK. The biggest investment gap, of £8.7bn per year, is in low carbon transport. If the Government were to reallocate the average annual investment committed to new road building towards low carbon transport infrastructure, it could already close 60% of that gap.

An initial economic stimulus package is due to be announced imminently by the government. Green Alliance’s report highlights that all decisions made at this point must resist the short-sightedness of returning to business as usual and urgently prioritise the UK’s long term resilience to future crises.

 

New Greenpeace report: green recovery could create a 1.8 million ‘jobs revolution’ - Greenpeace

A green economic recovery package totalling £100 billion could create 1.8 million new green jobs in industries such as energy, transport and housing, while helping to cut Britain’s climate-heating emissions, a new report published today (Tuesday 30 June) by Greenpeace UK has found.
The findings come ahead of an announcement from the Prime Minister later today, in which he is expected to set out the government’s plans to revive the economy, with tens of billions of pounds expected in stimulus packages.

The research – which was carried out by sustainability advisors, 3Keel, on behalf of Greenpeace UK – looked at the possible employment outcomes of the transformative policies and investments set out in Greenpeace’s manifesto for a green recovery, published last month.

Of the £100 billion that should be injected into zero-carbon industries to revive the economy over the next four years, almost half (£48 billion) should go towards cleaning up our transport system. This would create 890,000 new jobs in areas such as electric vehicle manufacturing, expanding and improving the public transport network and creating new infrastructure for walking and cycling all across the country.

A £25.2 billion stimulus package for smart power and renewable energy would create 320,000 jobs in offshore and onshore wind and solar power generation, as well as upgrading the electricity grid to ensure it is smart, flexible and able to cope with demand.

Increasing energy efficiency of homes and buildings, such as schools and hospitals, has the potential to create a huge number of nationwide jobs immediately, as programmes are ‘shovel-ready’ to roll out. A £17.2 billion investment in upgrading and retrofitting existing buildings would create a total of 400,000 jobs.

   

The Wildlife Trusts call for nature to be at the heart of economic recovery – not simply an ‘add-on’ - The Wildlife Trusts

The Wildlife Trusts are deeply disappointed by today's (Tuesday 30 June) Government announcement to spend billions on roads at a time when serious investment in nature could address the twin emergencies of our age - climate change and nature loss - as well as provide jobs and improve people's lives.
Today the Prime Minister announces a new deal for Britain “which puts jobs and infrastructure at the centre of the government’s economic growth strategy.”

Commenting on the Prime Minister’s speech, Craig Bennett, chief executive of The Wildlife Trusts, says: “Today the Government has announced billions for road building projects and just £40 million for nature. This is hugely disappointing. Serious investment in nature could provide a green recovery which addresses the twin crises of our age – climate change and loss of the natural world – while simultaneously providing many more jobs. Instead, the Government have chosen to spend billions of pounds on roads which will take us in precisely the wrong direction and mean that we keep lurching from one crisis to another. Serious investment in nature could provide a green recovery which addresses the twin crises of our age – climate change and loss of the natural world – while simultaneously providing many more jobs. It’s vital that we look to solutions that will help address nature loss and climate change, not make them worse. An economic recovery which puts investment in nature first would reap big dividends in tackling climate crisis – helping to absorb up to a third of UK emissions* – as well as tackling health inequalities, and providing more jobs, skills and opportunities to support the next generation.”

In his speech, the Prime Minister made specific reference to building fast and removing wildlife that presents an obstacle. The Wildlife Trusts are extremely concerned that this would jeopardise species such as dolphins and newts and also the abundance of our wildlife that is already deeply depleted. The Habitats and Birds Regulations have been reviewed by DEFRA numerous times and in 2012 were declared fit for purpose.

   

As Boris Johnson announces a new deal, we call for greater green ambition and share our vision for building back better - CPRE

CPRE today sets out our vision to regenerate the countryside and ourselves – and says the government’s plans make a mockery of its ‘so-called green recovery’.

The PM’s ‘new deal’ speech came just a day before CPRE, the countryside charity, launches our own detailed ‘manifesto’ for a green recovery that can support the regeneration of the economy, our wellbeing and the environment. This vision urges the government to use this post-coronavirus moment as an opportunity for real change, laying out recommendations for ways to stimulate the economy while making life greener and more resilient for the countryside and its communities.

Amongst other key proposals, Regenerate our countryside, regenerate ourselves: A manifesto for a resilient countryside after coronavirus emphasises that our Green Belts, the countryside next door for 30 million people, and other countryside around large towns and cities, should see funding significantly increased to make sure they’re used better for people and to help mitigate climate breakdown. It also presses for the support of greener farming techniques that could make our food supply more resilient.

The recommendations in the CPRE manifesto, with their emphasis on sustainable, community-led development and progress, are starkly at odds with Boris Johnson’s proposed approach. Tom Fyans, our campaigns and policy director, said: ‘With road building at its heart, the PM’s “new deal” makes a mockery of the government’s so-called green recovery. At this historic moment, the government must show real ambition and build back better, not worse, and in doing so balance our health and wellbeing, nature and countryside and the economic recovery.’

 

New funding and projects.

World Environment Day: £10.9m for international conservation - Defra

New funding announced to protect rare wildlife and vulnerable habitats across the globe

The Government has awarded £10.9 million for global projects to protect rare wildlife and vulnerable habitats to mark this year’s World Environment Day (5 June).

Wildlife set to benefit include turtles in the British Virgin Islands, penguins in South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, coral reefs in Comoros and endangered chimpanzees in Uganda.

Over the next three years, 17 projects will receive £5.7 million through the Darwin Initiative – a world-renowned scheme that protects wildlife and the natural environment across the world. In addition, £5.2 million will be given to 21 projects through the Darwin Plus scheme for conservation of the unique and globally significant plants and animals that reside in UK Overseas Territories.

Wildlife to benefit from this funding include:

  • The British Virgin Islands’ turtle populations and their reefs and seagrass meadow habitats through increasing local understanding of turtle conservation and fisher needs
  • Endangered chimpanzees in Uganda through supporting local communities and providing training for reforestation efforts
  • Coral reefs in the Comoros by helping small-scale fishers to effectively manage these habitats
  • A number of species, such as Antarctic fur seals, albatross and penguin species including macaroni, king and Gentoo, in South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands will be surveyed through drones to establish their baseline populations to help monitor and manage their long-term recovery

International Environment Minister Lord Goldsmith said: “World Environment Day provides us all with a stark reminder of the need to take urgent action to reverse global biodiversity loss.”

 

Welsh island puffins protected thanks to Heritage Emergency Fund grant - Heritage Fund

Skomer Island puffins. Credit: Mike Alexander
Skomer Island puffins. Credit: Mike Alexander

Thanks to a £48,000 National Lottery grant, wardens can continue to care for the vast colonies of rare seabirds that nest on Skomer and Skokholm.

Normally the puffins that nest on Skomer and Skokholm Islands, off the coast of Pembrokeshire in Wales, draw visitors from around the world.

But the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis has brought tourism to a standstill, devastating income for the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales (WTSWW) which cares for the islands.

Sarah Kessell, WTSWW’s Chief Executive Officer, explained: “We earn over half of our income from tourism – visitor centres, cafes, shops, holiday accommodation and day visits to the island. That income has been turned off overnight. It has left us with a gap in our budget of more than £500,000.”

They were faced with the prospect of withdrawing their four island wardens – two each for Skomer and Skokholm. But thanks to a £48,000 grant made through our Heritage Emergency Fund, the wardens can now continue protecting the islands' seabirds and other fragile wildlife.

   

Sustainability, Climate Change, Pollution and Litter.

Our new litter figures warn of the increased dangers as lockdown eases - RSPCA

We've received more than 21,600 reports of animals injured or caught in litter over the past five years, our new stats reveal.

We're urging people who are going out more since lockdown restrictions were eased to ensure they're taking their litter home with them or disposing of it properly and responsibly.

Over the past five years (2015-2019), our emergency hotline in England and Wales has received 6,466 calls about animals affected by general litter - like tin cans, plastic bottles and elastic bands. There have also been 15,183 reports relating to animals injured or caught in angling litter. There have been a further 12,904 reports of animals and birds trapped in netting, which includes netting discarded as rubbish but this also includes sports netting or netting put on bushes or trees to deter birds.

Our frontline officers are regularly called to help cats, birds and wildlife who have got themselves tangled in netting, injured in fishing litter or stuck in rubbish. They can find a fox with a tin can stuck on its head or a seal with fishing netting wrapped around its neck cutting into the flesh.

Head of our wildlife team, Adam Grogan, said: “Our staff are dealing with thousands of incidents every year where animals and birds have been impacted by litter - and they're the ones that we know of. I'm sure for every animal we're able to help there are many that go unseen, unreported and may even lose their lives. Litter is one of the biggest hazards our wildlife faces today - and it's something that's very easy to resolve. That's why we're calling on the public to take extra care to clear up after they've been out for a walk or enjoyed a picnic in the woods. Now that the Government has eased some of the lockdown restrictions, we're sure lots of families will be out and about in nature. But it's our job to protect nature and that includes properly and responsibly disposing of our litter so that animals can't be hurt.”

 

National Park takes new steps to tackle litter - North York Moors National Park Authority

The Education and Ranger teams from the North York Moors National Park Authority are taking steps to instil a positive change in those who are unaware of the damaging impacts of litter.

The Authority has increased the staff and volunteer presence to deal with this issue across the National Park and now members of the Education team will work alongside rangers at visitor hotspots. Staff and volunteers will engage with visitors and help them to enjoy the countryside responsibly to everyone’s benefit.

Mary-Jane Alexander, Youth Engagement Officer for the Authority, said: “Following recent littering, including one scenario where our rangers had to pull 20 bags of rubbish from the water, we just want more people to be aware of the impacts this will have on both our wildlife and the local communities who call the National Park their home. Since social distancing measures were first put in place, many people have revaluated what the countryside means to them. By not being allowed to travel, more people recognise just how important it is to be able to get out and explore nature, but we must understand the importance of protecting such spaces. Therefore, myself and others will be out and about to encourage others to do so.”

The new initiative also includes working alongside the Authority’s Young Rangers, aged between 11 and 17.

Mary-Jane added: “Our Young Rangers have come up with some wonderful ideas and we will be looking to roll some of these out in the weeks to come. These young people are the perfect role models of how to safely and responsibly enjoy the National Park and we would hope for others to look to them for inspiration.”

 

Help us #KeepItClean this summer! - Marine Conservation Society

Over the past few weeks, we’ve been shocked to see beaches, parks and public spaces suffering the scourge of litter and single-use plastic, from cups to gloves, takeaway food containers and face masks. So we’re asking for your help to spread the message that anyone enjoying time outdoors this summer should #KeepItClean and take their litter home.

It’s easy to think that litter on land has no role to play at sea, whereas in fact, 80% of ocean litter comes from land.

In a recent survey, 63% of those asked were very or extremely concerned about marine plastic pollution and 61% were very or extremely concerned about the health of our oceans. The concern for the health of our ocean must be echoed in our actions on land, whether on the beach, in a park or strolling down our local high street.

Almost a third (30.4%) of all litter found across the UK’s beaches over our Great British Beach Clean weekend last year was from the public, whether left on the beaches, blown in off the street or carried by waterways to the coast. The top ten most prolific items included cigarette stubs (42.6 per 100m); crisp, sweet and sandwich packets (30.9 per 100m); caps and lids (20.4 per 100m); alongside plastic or polystyrene pieces (143 per 100m). ‘On-the-go’ convenience packaging is amongst the most common types of litter, and one which could be easily avoided.

Lizzie Prior, Beachwatch Officer said: “There’s no doubt that the pictures of litter on beaches across the UK from this past few weeks are the worst I have ever seen, yet the awareness of marine pollution is the highest I have ever known. We know the impact litter, particularly plastic, has on our marine environment so please remember, wherever you go, take your litter home”

 

Climate-smart MPAs report published - JNCC

Today (8 June) sees the launch of 'Developing the evidence-base to support 'climate-smart' decision making around Marine Protected Areas (MPAs)', a report produced by our experts working on behalf of UK Government. This new research reveals that half of MPAs could contain habitats important for climate resistance.

Dr John Goold, Director of Marine Evidence and Advice at JNCC said: "This report, released today on World Oceans Day, provides important evidence to further understand the susceptibility of protected features within MPAs to climate change and their functional role in building overall resilience to the impacts of climate change. Outputs from this collaborative project will help support concepts such as climate-smart decision making in the marine environment."

Defra Minister Rebecca Pow said: "Our Blue Belt of marine protection around our coast is now an area twice the size of England and truly a world-leading level of protection; however, there is always more that can be done. We have a duty to ensure that our marine life recovers and thrives for future generations. This research published on World Ocean Day gives us the tools to measure the impacts of climate change on some of our most sensitive habitats and provides an important insight into the benefits of Marine Protected Areas – not just for nature but for our own resilience in the face of a changing climate."

 

Restoring nature-rich habitats helps offset UK carbon emissions - RSPB

Forestry on peat bog, bog pools in the midst of Lonielist plantation near Forsinard Credit: Andy Hay (rspb-images.com)
Forestry on peat bog, bog pools in the midst of Lonielist plantation near Forsinard Credit: Andy Hay (rspb-images.com)

The RSPB has identified how much carbon is being stored in areas important for wildlife

Much of these areas is in poor condition and unprotected, however restoration could lead not only to reduced emissions but actually to higher levels of sequestration

Restoring these areas to good condition could counterbalance nearly a third of the UKs agricultural emissions every year

Restoring the UK’s important habitats for nature could help lock away 14 million tonnes of CO2e per year, nearly a third our annual agricultural emissions, according to a new study led by RSPB scientists.

The UK has recently committed to ‘net zero’ greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 under the 2008 Climate Change Act. In order to reach this target, all sectors must commit to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, as well as removing gases from the atmosphere.

In a paper published today in the journal Biological Conservation, experts calculated the contribution made to achieving this net zero target by analysing how much carbon was already stored in areas important for conservation, and how much more could be sequestered each year if some of those areas were restored.

Dr Rob Field, lead author of the paper said: "Currently our nature-rich lands are already doing an excellent job; they hold a massive store of around 0.5 Gigatonnes of carbon, around 30% of our land-based store on just 20% of its area, as well as capturing an additional 8.7 million tonnes CO2e every year.

 

'Drink and drop' - new survey reveals a nation of thirsty litterers - Keep Britain Tidy

(image: Keep Britain Tidy)
(image: Keep Britain Tidy)

Research shows just what the nation is dropping

A new report, produced by Keep Britain Tidy and commissioned by Defra, reveals just how much litter is being dropped and what it is.

The research reveals that the bulk of the litter that is being thoughtlessly thrown on our streets, parks and beaches is the result of our insatiable thirst for drinking on the go.

The survey, carried out at a representative sample of sites across the country in 2019, looked not only at the number of items dropped but at the volume of that litter and it revealed that almost three quarters of the litter – a staggering 75% was the result of drinks consumption.

The most littered item, by volume, was the small plastic bottle (up to 750ml) for non-alcoholic drinks, which accounted for 24.4% of the total, but these are joined by cans, larger bottles, glass bottles, coffee cups, takeaway soft drinks cups and cartons to create a mountain of waste, much of which could and should be recycled but is, instead, polluting our environment and costing millions of pounds to clean up.

As we consider what a post-Covid green recovery should look like, we should allow ourselves to imagine a world without litter and plastic pollution. It is clear that we urgently need new measures to tackle all types of littering but particularly to address the issue of drinks containers, which make up nearly three quarters of the volume of litter in this country.

This is why we need a well-designed and comprehensive deposit return scheme as soon as possible, for all sizes of plastic, glass and aluminium drinks containers. In more than 40 countries and regions around the world, such schemes can drive up collection rates for drinks containers to over 90%, creating clean material for recycling and reducing littering.

 

CLA calls on Education Secretary to teach Countryside Code in schools - The Country Land and Business Association

The Country Land and Business Association (CLA) has written to the Secretary of State for Education, Gavin Williamson MP, calling for the Countryside Code to be taught in schools.

It comes following reports of worrying incidents taking place in rural areas as the country emerges from the Covid-19 crisis. These include fly-tipping, littering, trespassing, country lanes being blocked, gates being left open, dogs chasing livestock and a lack of social distancing.

There has been a spike in these types of actions occurring as more people have flocked to the countryside to enjoy the hot weather since lockdown rules were eased.

CLA President Mark Bridgeman said: “The countryside is a wonderful place and we want to see everybody enjoy it. But we also want them to be safe, and respect the countryside as a place of work. A lack of education on how to treat the countryside has left a generation without a basic understanding of what is an acceptable and indeed necessary standard of behaviour in a rural, working environment which produces food for the nation. We all have a part of to play in improving that understanding, but help in the classroom would be a great start. With the recent problems arising, including the tragic death of another walker attacked by cattle, we strongly believe this is the right time to get the Countryside Code into classrooms. There is an opportunity for lessons to be learned from the crisis. It is imperative we set standards and expectations, while promoting an ethos of respect for the countryside in schools up and

To read the letter sent to Secretary of State for Education, Gavin Williamson MP, click here

 

Dramatic rise in barbecues and litter as wildfire risk continues - National Trust

Formby Litter Copyright Colin Lane
Formby Litter Copyright Colin Lane

The National Trust is urging people not to bring a barbecue or light a campfire when they visit the coast and countryside, following a spate of wildfires during lockdown.

Despite recent rainfall, a record-breaking spring of sunshine has left many landscapes dry and created the perfect conditions for fires to ignite and quickly spread.

Since the start of April, several large blazes have broken out on the Trust’s land, including one near the Devon coast that was started by a barbecue and required six fire engines and a police helicopter to extinguish; one at a heathland site on the Wirral that is home to lizards and tiger beetles; and a 2km moorland blaze in West Yorkshire that tore through the nests of rare ground-nesting birds.

Rangers at the Trust have reported a rise in people bringing barbecues to the countryside, as extended spells of good weather have coincided with the easing of lockdown restrictions.
The late May bank holiday saw beauty spots including Formby Beach in Merseyside, Birling Gap in East Sussex and the North York Moors recording their busiest day ever for visitor numbers.

At Studland Beach, where the risk of wildfire was extreme, fire crews extinguished 30 unattended barbecues in a single night.

Many sites have also noticed an increase in litter – which not only blights the landscape and poses a threat to wildlife but can fuel wildfires.

With drier weather set to return this weekend, the charity is calling on those making trips to the coast and countryside not to bring a barbecue or leave litter behind.

Ben McCarthy, Head of Nature Conservation at the National Trust, said: “We know that people have missed the outdoors and open spaces these past few months – and we’re really pleased to be welcoming them back. But we’re urging people not to bring barbecues to the countryside or the coast. They can lead to real problems, particularly after such little rain in April and May. Many areas of land are still very dry and all it takes is a single spark from a barbecue or a dropped cigarette to cause a serious fire. Fires like these undermine our work to care for nature and respond to the climate emergency, which are priorities for the National Trust. Our local teams and the fire services are working hard to keep the countryside and coast safe for everyone, but resources are stretched. Please think of others; think of the wildlife; think of our emergency services; and don’t bring barbecues to the beach or countryside.”

 

COVID-19 can be an historic turning point in tackling the global climate crisis - The Committee on Climate Change

Ministers must seize the opportunity to turn the COVID-19 crisis into a defining moment in the fight against climate change, the Committee on Climate Change (CCC) says today.

In its annual report to Parliament, the Committee provides comprehensive new advice to the Government on delivering an economic recovery that accelerates the transition to a cleaner, net-zero emissions economy and strengthens the country’s resilience to the impacts of climate change.

Important steps have been taken in the last year, but much remains to be done. For the first time the Committee sets out its recommendations government department by government department. These are the urgent steps that must be taken in the months ahead to initiate a green, resilient COVID-19 recovery. They can be delivered through strong coordination across Whitehall. Doing so will propel the UK towards more rapid climate progress and position the country as an international climate leader ahead of the pivotal COP26 climate summit in Glasgow next year.

CCC Chairman, Lord Deben, said: “The UK is facing its biggest economic shock for a generation. Meanwhile, the global crisis of climate change is accelerating. We have a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to address these urgent challenges together; it’s there for the taking. The steps that the UK takes to rebuild from the COVID-19 pandemic can accelerate the transition to a successful and low-carbon economy and improve our climate resilience. Choices that lock in emissions or climate risks are unacceptable.”

Access the report here

Response: Annual climate change report welcomed by CLA - Country Land and Business Association Limited (CLA)

The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) has published its Reducing UK emissions: 2020 Progress Report to Parliament.

Commenting on the report, CLA President Mark Bridgeman said: “The CLA is committed to helping the government reach the net-zero target by 2050. Through the Agriculture Bill, Environment Bill, Tree Strategy and Peatland Strategy there is a fantastic opportunity to transform the sector and the way we use our land to reduce emissions and increase sequestration. Uncertainties about Brexit, trade negotiations and Covid-19 disruptions have delayed legislation and the development of policies for agriculture and land use that will support climate action. Farmers and land managers are increasingly looking at what they can do, but until there are clear policies and programmes for woodland creation and woodland management, alongside programmes to help shift the sector to low carbon farming, the progress will be slow. Addressing GHG emissions from agriculture and using nature to sequester and store carbon, and providing renewable energy, has many benefits for climate, nature and the economy. But this needs clear and long-term polices, and funding for programmes, that will encourage farmers and landowners to change how they farm and their land use.”

   

The plastics problem - how one young volunteer is making a big difference at Trimley Marshes - Suffolk Wildlife Trust

Our volunteers are amazing - meet Josh who is helping to remove plastic, nurdle by nurdle, from Trimley Marshes.

Joshua Drake, from Ipswich, has a passion for improving the environment and has recently made a huge difference at Trimley Marshes nature reserve.

Josh was shocked by the quantity of plastic waste he saw when he and his mother were taking their exercise walk at the reserve, and instead of just walking by he took it upon himself to clear it up. This was no small task, the rubbish along the tide line was a thick tangle of fishing line, rope, plastic sheets, bags and bottles; much of it degraded so it shredded into smaller and smaller fragments as they cleared it. Some of the plastic had become entwined amongst the grasses and plants, and it was a delicate process to safely remove it. He also found thousands of nurdles; tiny pellets of plastic used in manufacturing, which sadly end up polluting our rivers and seas. As you can imagine, clearing these small nurdles was a huge challenge, with hours spent checking the soil with a pair of tweezers in hand.

Josh feels very strongly that people need to reconsider their plastic use: “It’s terrible and very sad that there is so much plastic on the reserve, which is polluting the habitats of the birds and wildlife there. The ground is covered in nurdles and micro plastics that can be eaten by the birds and it will eventually kill them. I feel that the Docks and nearby companies need to take more care and responsibility for handling plastic safely and deal with any spillages straight away. It would also be better if everyone could use much less plastic so that nature stands a better chance of surviving.”

 

Land and Countryside Management including marine.

FLS trials new technique to restore sand dune habitats - Forestry and Land Scotland

A new method of restoring sand dunes to their pristine and natural condition is being trialed by Forestry and Land Scotland at Morrich More, a site near Tain in East Sutherland.

The project aims to remove trees – planted decades ago in a misguided attempt to help prevent dune erosion – and create the conditions that will allow dune vegetation to once more take hold and allow natural processes to conserve the coastline.

Suzanne Dolby, FLS Environment forester (North Region), said: “Sand dunes are vulnerable to coastal erosion, especially in the face of rising sea levels and more frequent severe weather events. Decades ago, the thinking was that planting trees on dunes would help to prevent them from being eroded and that this would help protect Scotland’s coastline. However, tidal and wave action continued to drive erosion under the tree roots and actually encouraged erosion. These days, the awareness and understanding of the cycles that sand dunes go through – and their value as habitats in their own right - is much more prevalent so we are looking at how best we can restore sand dunes to their natural state.”

Sand dunes help to protect the coastline and are likely to be an increasingly important defence against sea level rise as a result of the Climate Emergency.

 

Value of UNESCO status highlighted in report - Biosphere Isle of Man

The environmental, cultural and financial value of UNESCO designations is highlighted in a report published today.

The Isle of Man is a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and encourages balance between people and their environment and promotes sustainable living.

The Island’s Biosphere is one of 160 sites that come under the UK National Commission (UKNC) for UNESCO. As well as eight fellow UK and Ireland Biospheres, there are World Heritage Sites, Global Geoparks and Creative Cities.

‘The National Value of UNESCO Designations to the UK’, published by the UKNC, is the first report to comprehensively examine the environmental, cultural and financial contribution UNESCO designations make to their locations.

UNESCO projects help build a greener, more equal and more peaceful world, as aspired to in the UN’s 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the report says.

UNESCO and the UKNC play a crucial role in developing and strengthening partnerships between designations and the institutions and people in them.

The report examines 76 UNESCO designations in the UK and estimates that they generated £151 million for their economies annually.

Read the full report here

 

AI system could identify roadside invasive species - UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology

The new AI system will identify potentially damaging plant species such as Japanese knotweed Picture: Crown Copyright/GBNNSS
The new AI system will identify potentially damaging plant species such as Japanese knotweed Picture: Crown Copyright/GBNNSS

Invasive plant species like Japanese knotweed cause damage across the UK, but finding them and tracking their growth can be time-consuming and expensive, especially along roads and railways.

Now, scientists from the UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology (UKCEH) and Keen AI, a Birmingham-based artificial intelligence and machine learning company, are developing a new artificial intelligence (AI) system that can quickly survey large and inconvenient areas for invasive and potentially damaging plant species.

The team has been funded by Innovate UK to run a 10-month pilot project for the new system in two locations: north Wales and the Midlands.

They will place a high-speed camera on top of a vehicle and survey up to 120 miles of vegetated roadside per day. The captured images will be tagged with their GPS location and uploaded to an online platform where UKCEH ecologists will identify the plants in the photographs.

The next task will be to teach the AI how to correctly identify invasive species like Japanese knotweed, rhododendrons, Himalayan balsam and cherry laurel. The team will also add ash trees to its learning: these are native to the UK, but currently at risk of ash dieback disease.

 

Nature-friendly farming methods allow biodiversity to flourish at Wimpole - National Trust

Nature and soil health are flourishing at Wimpole Home Farm near Cambridge according to the results of a full ‘health-check’ into its biodiversity, carbon levels and levels of public accessibility.

A male skylark singing in flight © National Trust Images/Nick Upton
A male skylark singing in flight © National Trust Images/Nick Upton

The results, announced as the landmark Agriculture Bill which starts its next crucial stage in the House of Lords tomorrow (10 June), show increases in the numbers of breeding pairs of rare farmland birds, invertebrates and how the land can significantly capture carbon.

Mark Harold, Director of Land and Nature at the National Trust said: ‘Sustainable, productive and profitable farming is underpinned by a healthy environment. Coronavirus has shown how important it is to have a resilient food and farming system. We know that climate change and sustainability pose the greatest threats to food security, as this year’s flooding and now drought have shown. The Agriculture Bill – and the principle of public money for public goods at its heart – is an opportunity to deliver this. With a focus on sustainable land management, wildlife and soil health can recover quicker than we might think. The story at Wimpole paints one of hope and optimism – and the government’s forthcoming “environmental land management scheme” will be crucial to replicating this across the farming industry, as will the new Agriculture Bill in prioritising government support for this scheme. Together, these two mechanisms will ensure all farms have a sustainable future which will be good for the environment, good for farm businesses and good for people.’

The organic farm has been focusing on nature-friendly, sustainable farming methods for the past 12 years to reflect our goals for farming models which are good for nature, good for the public and are profitable.

 

Macduff sheep working to keep Giant hogweed at bay - Scottish Natural Heritage

Sheep with hogweed ©SISI project
Sheep with hogweed ©SISI project

A flock of woolly warriors introduced by the Scottish Invasive Species Initiative into woodland alongside the River Deveron have made a great start in their mission to munch away invasive Giant hogweed plants.
The sheep were introduced into the strip of woodland along the river beyond the Macduff distillery as part of a hogweed grazing trial last spring and have now arrived back to the woodland to recommence their important work after a well-earned winter break. There are fewer sheep on site in 2020 compared to last year to avoid overgrazing impacts detected in the monitoring of the 2019 season.

Many walkers continue to use the site and are welcome to do so, but are being reminded to be aware of the sheep and act responsibly – including by keeping dogs on leads. As there are fewer animals present in the woodland they might not always be visible.

Karen Muller, Project Officer for the Scottish Invasive Species Initiative, said: “We are really pleased with how the first year of the trial has gone. The sheep did what we hoped they would do and ate away at the Giant hogweed plants with no ill-effects. We’ve made a few adjustments this year and will continue to monitor closely how this season goes.”

 

Dark Sky Reserve bid endorsed - Yorkshire Dales National Park

An application for International Dark Sky Reserve status for the Yorkshire Dales National Park has been endorsed by the National Park Authority’s board, after research showed the quality of the dark sky in the Dales to be ‘exceptional’.

Yesterday’s annual general meeting of the Yorkshire Dales National Park Authority (YDNPA) heard that more than 400 light measurements had been taken at night across 290 locations in the National Park from late 2018 through to early spring this year.

More than 100 locations had readings of 21.2mpas (magnitudes per square arcsecond) or more, which is the minimum requirement for a Dark Sky Reserve.

Members of the board agreed that the core area of the Dark Sky Reserve could comprise a large arc of land around but not including Hawes, taking in the upper ends of Swaledale, Rawthey Valley, Garsdale, Littondale and Wharfedale. The core area would cover 30% of the entire National Park.

Members also adopted a Light Management Plan. It contains principles on external lighting which will be given effect in the next Local Plan.

Nick Cotton, the YDNPA’s Member Champion for Recreation Management, said: “I would like to thank the National Park Authority volunteers who worked alongside members of local astronomy groups to gather the light readings necessary to support our Dark Sky Reserve application. The dark sky in the National Park has been recognised as one of its special qualities for many years. Now we’ve got the data to back it up. Dark Sky Reserve status will help us gain international recognition and preserve the dark sky of the National Park. It has the potential to boost the tourism economy too. On a clear winter’s night in the National Park you can see the Milky Way, planets, shooting stars and sometimes even the northern lights. People will come to stay in the National Park for that. Our dark skies festival, run with local businesses, goes from strength to strength and shows the high level of interest amongst visitors and residents alike.”

 

Key scientific reports shine new light on value of heather burning - The Moorland Association

(image: The Moorland Association)
(image: The Moorland Association)

A dossier of new evidence on peatland protection has highlighted a raft of scientific findings that could help shape future conservation of some of the UK’s most iconic landscapes.

New research on key issues including carbon storage, water quality, biodiversity and wildfire reveals that conclusions drawn from previous science are now out of date and not safe to be used as the basis for key political decisions on the management of peatland.

The dossier comprises four reports from university researchers and scientists and focuses on the evidence surrounding the use of controlled burning to help restore, maintain and improve peatlands.

Key findings from the reports include:-
• Burned areas of blanket bog are capable of increased levels of carbon capture.
• Production of charcoal during managed burning has a positive impact on long-term carbon storage.
• Burning does not appear to cause water discolouration.
• Controlled burning reduces fuel loads and may, therefore, help to prevent and limit wildfires.
• Overabundance of heather is limited by burning.
• Environmentally important Sphagnum capillifolium moss recovers from ‘cool’ managed burning within three years.
• The ending of managed burning in the USA resulted in declines in bird life and an increase in devastating wildfires.
• Greenhouse gas emissions from controlled burning are insignificant compared with emissions from wildfire or severely degraded lowland peatlands used for agriculture.

Mark Ashby, of Lancaster University and Whitebeam Ecology, who, in the latest report, conducted an extensive review of evidence on heather burning, said: “The debate around heather burning remains unresolved. The review of the latest evidence demonstrates that some previously held assumptions are now unsafe and should, therefore, not be used as the basis for policy. This newly reviewed scientific evidence should be taken into account when determining how best to protect peatland in the future. The time is now right to review Natural England’s February 2018 position statement which takes a largely negative view of controlled burning and critically examine the circumstances in which burning may be an appropriate peatland restoration tool. The increased threat and impact from severe wildfires must now also be taken into account in terms of mitigating damage to the structure and function of blanket bog.”

 

“Track and trace” of cows introduced in woods to boost biodiversity - Woodland Trust

A small herd of cows will be tagged with GPS in a new scheme by the Woodland Trust to track their “moovements” and how they can boost diversity.

Six Dexter cows started roaming Avon Valley Woods, Devon, at the weekend. At least one of these will be fitted with a GPS collar, and visitors to the wood will be able to track online where the cows are.

The tracking system will allow the Trust to assess where the cows have been and what impact they’ve made in helping to regenerate the wood and its wildlife. It will also allow the cows’ health and wellbeing to be monitored.

Conservation grazier John Severn, of Cows in Clover which has supplied the cows, said: “The trampling of cows’ hooves will stir up the soil, releasing and encouraging seeds to germinate and new plants to flourish. Their dung will attract insects which will in turn provide food for birds and bats.

 

Arboriculture, Woodlands and Forestry

Disappointing planting figures in England still far below Government target - Woodland Trust

Responding to Provisional Woodland Statistics 2020 published by Forest Research

Trees and woods belong at the heart of any green recovery. (Credit: Adam Burton / WTML)
Trees and woods belong at the heart of any green recovery. (Credit: Adam Burton / WTML)

Darren Moorcroft, CEO of the Woodland Trust said: "Despite huge interest in trees and woods, these new statistics show we are a long way from where we need to be. To get us moving in the right direction, the Government's planned England Tree Strategy needs to deliver a bold vision for trees and woods. That means not just more trees in the ground, but planning as part of the landscape, so they deliver for carbon, nature and people, with firm quality not just quantity targets. We must also do far more to look after the trees and woods we already have, restoring and protecting our precious ancient woodlands and stopping the risk of imported tree disease by sourcing and growing the trees we plant in this country. Action to rebuild our economy and society after the coronavirus epidemic must also invest for the long term in our precious natural environment. Protecting, restoring and expanding native tree cover – with all the social, economic and environmental benefits that will bring - belongs at the heart of any ‘green recovery’ worthy of the name. We also need to strengthen supply chains so we can make good on commitments to expand trees and woodlands to 2050 and beyond.”

UK Government must raise game on conifer planting record - Confor

Confor has warned the UK Government that it will fail to meet its planting targets unless it makes rapid progress in getting many more trees into the ground in England.

Stuart Goodall, Confor CEO, specifically highlighted the need to stimulate the planting of new productive forests to provide the supplies of wood needed for a future green economy.

According to new official figures, overall tree planting across the UK totalled 13,460 hectares in the year to March 31, 2020 - very similar to the 2018-19 figure of around 13,400 hectares.

planting figures via confor
planting figures via confor

This means no real progress has been made towards achieving the UK Government's ambitious target of planting 30,000 hectares of new woodland every year by 2025. In fact, in England the level of productive conifer planting actually fell to a “miserable” 230 hectares.

Mr Goodall said: "While we were pleased to see the UK Government commit to an ambitious planting target, these figures show the Government is way off track. The 2025 target is in line with what Confor has said is achievable, and shows that Government is listening to the Committee on Climate Change who have emphasised repeatedly that tree planting must be a key component in the fight to reduce atmospheric carbon and tackle climate change. However, to hit such targets will require large-scale planting of both conifers and broadleaves in England, and that simply isn’t happening – 230 hectares of conifer is a miserable achievement. We need to be planting far more productive forestry if we are to reduce our global carbon and environmental footprint – the UK is the second largest net importer of timber in the world after China."

The figures showed Scotland is still planting more than 80 per cent of trees in the UK - 10,860 hectares, including around 7,570 hectares of conifers and 3,890 hectares of broadleaves.  More on the Scottish figures here.

 

Consultation launched on the England Tree Strategy - Defra

Government consults on plans to update its policy for trees, woodland and forestry through creation of a new England Tree Strategy.

  • Consultation to run for 12 weeks, seeking views on how to increase tree planting and tree and woodland management.
  • Trees are a unique natural asset that play a crucial role in combating the biodiversity and climate crises we face.
  • The government’s environmental programme will play its full part as we build back better and secure a fair, green and resilient recovery from the coronavirus pandemic.
Credit: Forestry Commission
Credit: Forestry Commission

Plans to accelerate tree planting and improve the management of our existing trees and woodlands are underway as the government today (19 June) launched a consultation to inform a new England Tree Strategy.

Everyone – from farmers, foresters and land managers, experts and environmental organisations, to members of the public – is being invited to give their views on the future creation and management of our trees, woodlands and forests.

Subject to consultation, the new strategy will set out policies to expand tree cover, support woodland management and increase public engagement with trees and woodlands. It will help ensure the government’s tree planting commitment – to increase tree planting to 30,000 hectares per year across the UK by 2025 - is delivered, working closely with the devolved administrations, communities and landowners to do so.

The government is asking for views on:

  • how to expand, protect and improve our public and private trees and woodlands,
  • the increased role that trees and woodlands can play in supporting the economy,
  • how best to further connect people to nature, and
  • the most effective way in which trees and woodlands can be created and managed to help combat climate change.

 

Marine

Government and the public urged to help turn the tide for our struggling seas on World Oceans Day - Wildlife and Countryside Link

Ocean charities and organisations including Greenpeace, Marine Conservation Society, Surfers Against Sewage, Whale and Dolphin Conservation and WWF are calling for a sea change in ambition in Government marine policy to restore our marine environment by 2030. The calls come in a new ‘Ocean Recovery Manifesto’ launched today, World Oceans Day 2020 (8 June), by the Wildlife and Countryside Link coalition. The organisations are also launching a photo competition for the public to show how much our seas mean to them, and help raise the issue up the political agenda.

Our ocean is suffocating, with overuse, pollution and climate change all causing severe declines in marine habitats and wildlife. The group welcomed the Government’s action for our seas so far, with designation of Marine Protected Areas, its new seabird action plan, and its strong leadership in the Global Ocean Alliance, but highlighted the scale of change needed to achieve healthy seas around our own shores.

UK Governments have a legal target to achieve healthy seas by 2020, but in 2019 our waters failed to meet 11 out of 15 indicators of good sea health. Ocean campaigners in the Wildlife and Countryside Link coalition want the Government to take legal and practical action now, including fully protecting 30% of our waters, to get English seas healthy again. A first step should be the swift designation of Highly Protected Marine Areas around England, as recommended by a government-commissioned report published today.
Chris Tuckett, of the Marine Conservation Society and Chair of the Wildlife and Countryside Link Marine Group, said: ‘Our ocean is vital to the health of all of us. It is the lifeblood of the planet, producing more than half of the air we breathe, food and medicines, including the first experimental drug trialed for covid-19. But the ocean that we rely on is in trouble and without help it won’t be able to support future generations. This World Oceans Day we’re asking the Government to up its ambition for our seas ahead of COP26 and give the global leadership we need for our ocean starting on our own doorstep.’

 

Independent review backs introduction of Highly Protected Marine Areas - Defra

Review recommends introduction of Highly Protected Marine Areas as essential for marine protection and recovery.

An independent review led by former Fisheries Minister Richard Benyon, and published today on World Ocean Day, is calling for the introduction of Highly Protected Marine Areas in English waters. The review was commissioned on last year’s world ocean day by then Environment Secretary Michael Gove as part of the Government’s drive to protect our waters.

These highly protected marine areas would enable a greater recovery of the marine ecosystem and enhance the Government’s commitment to a national ‘Blue Belt’, which has already seen an area of 92,000 square km protected - 40% of English seas.

The UK currently has a range of protections in place through a network of 355 Marine Protected Areas, which offer protections for a designated feature or habitat within their boundaries. Highly Protected Marine Areas would go further by taking a ‘whole site approach’ and only permitting certain activities within their boundaries such as vessel transit, scuba diving and kayaking. Activities that could have a damaging effect on habitats or wildlife, including fishing, construction and dredging would be banned. The review claims the introduction of such areas could lead to a significant biodiversity boost for our seas by giving our marine life the best chance to recover and thrive.

 

Benyon review of Highly Protected Marine Areas published today - The Wildlife Trusts

The Wildlife Trusts back new form of protection for the sea and call on Government for ambitious delivery plan for Highly Protected Marine Areas within a year.

The Benyon review of Highly Protected Marine Areas (HPMAs) is published by Defra today. The Wildlife Trusts back its recommendations that HPMAs should be an essential part of the UK network for protection and recovery of the marine environment, and the government should introduce HPMAs within existing protected areas.

The review is published on World Oceans Day by an independent panel of members from academia, industry and conservation backgrounds and chaired by former MP and Fisheries Minister Richard Benyon. The Wildlife Trusts believe that there is an overwhelming case for HPMAs across our seas which would see a ban on all damaging activities. We are calling for an ambitious HPMA delivery plan within a year.

One of the Review panel, Joan Edwards, director of marine conservation at The Wildlife Trusts says: “Our seas are in an impoverished state and it’s hard for our generation to comprehend how abundant our waters once were. Cod were once as long and wide as humans are tall, and whales, dolphins and basking sharks were many times more common than they are today. We need to let the sea show us what it’s capable of. Today’s publication proposes a vital way of achieving marine recovery. We want to see real ambition from the Government with a commitment to a HPMA delivery plan agreed before World Oceans Day in 2021.”

 

Supertrawlers spent 2963 hours fishing in UK Marine Protected Areas in 2019 - Greenpeace UK

A Greenpeace investigation has revealed that supertrawlers spent 2963 hours fishing in UK Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) in 2019, the equivalent of 123 days.

Spertrawlers are freezer trawlers over 100m in length. They can catch hundreds of tonnes of fish every day using nets up to a mile long.

25 supertrawlers were active in UK waters in 2019 [1] and spent time fishing in 39 UK MPAs [2]. None of the supertrawlers active in UK waters in 2019 are UK owned. All were operating legally. Greenpeace has today launched a petition urging the UK government to ban supertrawlers, which are not compatible with properly protected marine areas, from fishing in MPAs.

The 39 MPAs affected by supertrawler operations in 2019 are all in offshore waters (beyond 12 nautical miles from the coast). They protect important marine ecosystems and species, including porpoises and reefs. One of the areas most heavily fished in by supertrawlers in 2019 was the Southern North Sea (east coast of England), created to safeguard porpoises which are particularly threatened by supertrawlers. 1105 porpoises died in fishing nets in 2019 [3].

Chris Thorne, Oceans Campaigner at Greenpeace UK, said: “Our government allowing destructive supertrawlers to fish for thousands of hours every year in Marine Protected Areas makes a mockery of the word ‘protected’. Even an hour of supertrawler activity inside an ecologically sensitive marine environment is too much, let alone almost 3000. For our government to be taken seriously as a leader in marine protection, it must ban supertrawler operations in the UK’s Marine Protected Areas. Will our government heed the recommendations of the Highly Protected Marine Area review and seize the historic opportunity Brexit provides to fix the UK’s broken network of Marine Protected Areas, or will it allow the flawed status quo to continue?”

 

Recreation, Volunteering and Environmental Education.

UK values nature more as a result of lockdown, according to summer solstice poll - National Trust

Blue tit (Dougie Holden)
Blue tit (Dougie Holden)

A poll commissioned by the National Trust has revealed how an increased relationship with nature appears to have helped people across the UK since the coronavirus pandemic outbreak in March.

With this weekend’s summer solstice, the conservation charity is encouraging people all over the country to make the most of the longest day by noticing and enjoying the moment, either by experiencing a dawn or sunset in their garden or local green space; or noticing the wildlife and flowers active at dawn or dusk in their garden or local park.

Findings in the YouGov poll revealed that more than two-thirds (68 per cent) of adults either agreed or strongly agreed that spending time noticing the nature around them has made them feel happy during lockdown. Three-quarters of all the women who responded (75 per cent) either agreed or strongly agreed that this was the case, versus approximately two-thirds (62 per cent) of all men.

More than half the population (55 per cent) also agreed or strongly agreed that they plan to make a habit of spending as much time in nature once things go back to normal.

Findings also revealed that since lockdown interest in nature has risen by a third (33 per cent), with interest growing the most in the 25-34 year old age group (40 per cent). And with lockdown restrictions easing over the past two weeks, 41 per cent of respondents said they were still spending a little or a lot more time in nature in the past two weeks compared to this time last year.

Announcing the results ahead of this weekend’s longest day, Andy Beer, Noticing Nature Project Lead at the National Trust said: “Although we suspected that nature was providing the nation some level of comfort during these distressing and unprecedented times, we wanted to get a better understanding of how it was helping people through this period. The results tell us that people have found spending time in nature or seeing nature has had a positive effect on their mood, and hopefully therefore, helped their mental wellbeing. Mounting evidence shows that everyday connections with nature has a positive impact on mental health and wellbeing. The fact that people are recognising so fully how nature has helped them during the crisis can only be a good thing for people, nature and wildlife.”

 

Scientific Research, Results and Publications.

Scientists warn against ‘greenwashing’ of global coastal developments - University of Plymouth

Research by the University says the artificial structures and reclaimed land of coastal cities are often poor surrogates for the natural environment

The world’s waterfront cities should not be deluged with apparently green developments because they still carry the potential to cause damage to the marine and coastal environment, scientists have warned.

Coastal urban areas all over the world have expanded at an increasingly fast pace in recent years, with developers innovating a variety of ways to try and minimise their impact on natural habitats.

However, an international team of scientists has said the artificial structures and reclaimed land that have resulted are often poor surrogates for the natural environment they replace.

They say that where societal and economic demand makes development inevitable, more attention must be paid to claims over biodiversity gain because a ‘greened’ development will always impinge on natural systems.

The calls are made in a commentary article, accepted for publication in the Journal of Applied Ecology and written by eco-engineers, ecologists and marine biologists from the UK, Italy and Malaysia.

Led by researchers from the University of Plymouth, it particularly focuses on the application of so-called integrated greening of grey infrastructure (IGGI).

Despite it already being implemented in many places, they believe there is considerable scope for it to be misused, leading to the ‘greenwashing’ of new developments including seawalls, breakwaters and artificial islands.

Instead, the scientists say it can undoubtedly be used to enhance previously-developed or degraded environments, and those projects should act as a testbed for where IGGI can have a positive – and, just as importantly, a negative – impact.

 

Replacing GDP with Gross Ecosystem Product reveals value of nature - University of Exeter

Replacing Gross Domestic Product (GDP) with a new “ecosystem” measure reveals the enormous value of the natural world, new research shows.

GDP – widely used by decision-makers around the world – summarises the value of all goods and services bought and sold in a country during a specific period as a single figure.

But it takes no account of how nature contributes to economic activity and human wellbeing.

The new study, by an international team including the University of Exeter, calls this a “critical omission” and suggests a new way to measure that missing value of nature: “Gross Ecosystem Product” (GEP).

This new approach is demonstrated in action through a case study in China, where the government is working to develop and implement GEP as a comparable compliment to GDP.

“To achieve sustainable development, we need to move beyond conventional economic measures like GDP,” said Professor Ian Bateman, Director of the Land, Environment, Economics and Policy Institute (LEEP) which is in the Department of Economics at the University of Exeter Business School. “The global economy, as conventionally measured by GDP, more than doubled between 1990 and 2015. However, at the same time our stocks of ‘ecosystem assets’ – such as forests, grasslands, wetlands, fertile soils and biodiversity – have come under increasing pressure. These things are obviously valuable in many ways – including to human wellbeing. However, in this study we examine the benefits they bring us measured in a way that governments and business can understand.”

 

Crop pathogens ‘remarkably adaptable’ - University of Exeter

Pathogens that attack agricultural crops show remarkable adaptability to new climates and new plant hosts, new research shows.

Researchers at the Department of Biosciences, University of Exeter studied the temperature preferences and host plant diversity of hundreds of fungi and oomycetes that attack our crops.

The researchers found that plant pathogens can specialise on particular temperatures or host plants, or have wide temperature or host ranges.

Lead author Professor Dan Bebber, a member of Exeter’s Global Systems Institute, said: “Traditionally, scientists have considered species to be specialists or generalists. Generalists are sometimes called ‘Jack of all trades, master of none’. Our analyses show that many plant pathogens are ‘Jack of some trades, master of others’.”

Tom Chaloner, an SWBIO DTP PhD student, said: “We have collated the largest dataset on plant pathogen temperature responses, and made this available for the scientific community. Our data allow us to test some of the most fundamental questions in ecology and evolution. For example, we found that temperature preferences are narrower when pathogens are growing within plants, demonstrating the difference between the so-called fundamental niche and the realised niche.”

The researchers used recently-developed statistical methods to investigate the co-evolution between pathogens and their hosts, showing that pathogens can readily evolve to attack new host plants.

 

Poorly designed tree-planting campaigns could do more harm than good, according to Stanford researcher and others - Stanford University

The first-of-its-kind study reveals that subsidies for the planting of commercially valuable tree plantations in Chile resulted in the loss of biologically valuable natural forests and little, if any, additional carbon sequestration.

Campaigns to plant huge numbers of trees could backfire, according to a new study that is the first to rigorously analyze the potential effects of subsidies in such schemes.

Tree planting is widely proposed to curb climate change and biodiversity loss. However, examining the results of a reforestation policy in Chile revealed that planting trees may have minimal effects on carbon sequestration and negative effects on biodiversity.

The analysis, published on June 22 in Nature Sustainability, reveals how efforts such as the global Trillion Trees campaign and a related initiative (H. R. 5859) under consideration by the U.S. Congress could lead to more biodiversity loss and little, if any, climate change upside. The researchers emphasize, however, that these efforts could have significant benefits if they include strong subsidy restrictions, such as prohibitions against replacing native forests with tree plantations.

“If policies to incentivize tree plantations are poorly designed or poorly enforced, there is a high risk of not only wasting public money but also releasing more carbon and losing biodiversity,” said study co-author Eric Lambin, the George and Setsuko Ishiyama Provostial Professor in Stanford’s School of Earth, Energy & Environmental Sciences. “That’s the exact opposite of what these policies are aiming for.”

There is no question that forests have an outsized role to play in efforts to slow global biodiversity loss and combat climate change by sequestering carbon as biomass. So it makes sense that tree-planting as a solution has gained traction in recent years with ambitious commitments, such as the Bonn Challenge, which seeks to restore an area of forest more than eight times the size of California by 2030, and Trillion Trees, which seeks to plant as many trees as its name implies.

 

Artificial night sky poses serious threat to coastal species - University of Plymouth

Street lighting creates an artificial glow in the night sky above Plymouth and the surrounding areas (Credit Thomas Davies, University of Plymouth)
Street lighting creates an artificial glow in the night sky above Plymouth and the surrounding areas (Credit Thomas Davies, University of Plymouth)

A new study shows the skyglow created by street lighting in towns and cities can lead to certain species travelling towards the sea and away from food

The artificial lighting which lines the world’s coastlines could be having a significant impact on species that rely on the moon and stars to find food, new research suggests.

Creatures such as the sand hopper (Talitrus saltator) orientate their nightly migrations based on the moon’s position and brightness of the natural night sky.

However, a study by the University of Plymouth and Bangor University shows the presence of artificial light originating from cities several kilometres away (also known as artificial skyglow) disrupts the lunar compass they use when covering long distances.

In some cases, this can lead to them travelling towards the sea and away from food, while in others it reduces the chance of them venturing out on forays for food at all.

Writing in Current Biology, researchers say this could pose a distinct threat not just to the health of sand hopper populations but also the wider ecosystem, since they play an important role in breaking down and recycling algae washed up on strandlines.

The study was conducted as part of the Artificial Light Impacts on Coastal Ecosystems (ALICE) project, funded by the Natural Environment Research Council.

   

Agricultural conservation schemes not enough to protect Britain’s rarest butterflies - University of York

Conservation management around the margins of agriculture fail to protect butterfly species at greatest risk from the intensification of farming, a new study says.

The research, from the University of York, says the subsidised schemes are likely to help common, more mobile grassland species like the Ringlet (Aphantopus hyperantus) or the Meadow brown (Maniola jurtina) but not rarer species like the Duke of Burgundy (Hamearis lucina) or the Dingy skipper (Erynnis tages).

Grassland: Agri-environment schemes financially reward farmers managing land in ways which aim to reduce the environmental impacts of agriculture. Common options include setting aside small areas of land out of production, including leaving grassland strips at the edges of agricultural fields.

The study examined whether these strips helped support insects including grassland butterfly populations. It used ecological models to look at whether the schemes improved butterfly survival locally and also if set aside land helped species expand their range and move across landscapes. This expansion is important so that species can move in response to climate change.

Landscapes: Katie Threadgill, PhD student from the Department of Biology said: “These kind of set aside schemes help mobile, common butterfly species move across landscapes but they do not help all species. The greatest benefits were seen in species which were either highly mobile or which live in high densities. High density species which could travel further were already successful expanders regardless of set-asides although expansion rates were still improved when set-asides were added. Overall, set-aside strips did increase rates of range expansion across landscapes by up to 100% for some species but they did not boost long term butterfly survival locally."

Read the paper: Threadgill, K.R.D., McClean, C.J., Hodgson, J.A., Jones, N. and Hill, J.K. (2020), Agri‐environment conservation set‐asides have co-benefits for connectivity. Ecography. doi:10.1111/ecog.05127

 

Scientists warn of increasing threats posed by invasive alien species - UK Centre for Ecology and Hydrology

In a new study, scientists from around the world warn that the threats posed by invasive alien species are increasing. They say that urgent action is required in order to prevent, detect, and control invaders at both local and global levels.

Alien species are plants, animals and microbes that are introduced by people, accidentally or intentionally, into areas where they do not naturally occur. Many of them thrive, spreading widely with harmful effects on the environment, economy, or human health.

Plastic rope transporting living corals, washed ashore on Easter Island. Photo by James T Carlton
Plastic rope transporting living corals, washed ashore on Easter Island. Photo by James T Carlton

The study, published in Biological Reviews, was carried out by an international team of researchers from 13 countries across Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North and South America. It states that the number of invasive alien species is increasing rapidly, with over 18,000 currently listed around the world.

The researchers attribute the escalation in biological invasions to the increase in the number and variety of pathways along which species spread, and to the increasing volume of traffic associated with those pathways. They highlight the role of emerging pathways such as the online trade in unusual pets, and the transport of species across oceans on rafts of plastic.

The study also shows how other drivers of global change, such as climate change, land-use change, alongside international trade are exacerbating the impacts of biological invasions. For example, species transported through shipping can now thrive in new regions, owing to climate warming; and the permanent opening of the Arctic Ocean with global warming is allowing marine species to move between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.

The paper is a part of the World scientists’ warning to humanity: a second notice initiative* calling for urgent change in our stewardship of the Earth and the life on it. The authors stress that biological invasions can be managed and mitigated. They point to approaches that are working around the world and make specific recommendations for improved management. For example, the introduction of more stringent border controls, including X-ray machines and detector dogs, has led to a progressive decline in the rate of fungal plant pathogens entering New Zealand.

Access the paper: Pyšek P et al: Scientists’ warning on invasive alien species. Biological Reviews. DOI: 10.1111/brv.12627

Ecosystem degradation could raise risk of pandemics - University of Exeter

Environmental destruction may make pandemics more likely and less manageable, new research suggests.

The study, by the University of the West of England and the Greenpeace Research Laboratories at the University of Exeter, presents the hypothesis that disease risks are “ultimately interlinked” with biodiversity and natural processes such as the water cycle.

Using a framework designed to analyse and communicate complex relationships between society and the environment, the study concludes that maintaining intact and fully functioning ecosystems and their associated environmental and health benefits is key to preventing the emergence of new pandemics.

The loss of these benefits through ecosystem degradation – including deforestation, land use change and agricultural intensification – further compounds the problem by undermining water and other resources essential for reducing disease transmission and mitigating the impact of emerging infectious diseases.

Lead author Dr Mark Everard, of the University of the West of England (UWE Bristol), said: ”Ecosystems naturally restrain the transfer of diseases from animals to humans, but this service declines as ecosystems become degraded. At the same time, ecosystem degradation undermines water security, limiting availability of adequate water for good hand hygiene, sanitation and disease treatment. Disease risk cannot be dissociated from ecosystem conservation and natural resource security.”

 

Where there’s muck, there’s brass - Rothamsted Research

Science finally unearths why soil carbon is so valuable

A radical new way of thinking about soil has solved the mystery of why adding organic material like manure improves flood and drought resilience, climate control and crop yields - universal ‘ecosystem services’ that are widely recognised as worth billions to the global economy.

Founded on more than 50 years’ worth of data from a unique field experiment, researchers have demonstrated that common farming practices drain the soil of carbon, altering the structure of soils’ microscopic habitat and, remarkably, the genetics of microbes living within it.

The team of microbiologists and physicists, led by Rothamsted Research, considered almost 9,000 genes, and used X-ray imaging to look at soil pores smaller than the width of a human hair, and in concert with previous work, have started forming what they envisage will be a universal ‘Theory of Soil’.

In healthy soils, relatively low nitrogen levels limit microbes’ ability to utilise carbon compounds, so they excrete them as polymers which act as a kind of ‘glue’ - creating a porous, interconnected structure in the soil which allows water, air, and nutrients to circulate.

Writing in the journal Scientific Reports, the researchers reveal that the Victorian-era switch from manure to ammonia and phosphorous based fertilizers has caused microbes to metabolise more carbon, excrete less polymers and fundamentally alter the properties of farmland soils when compared to their original grassland state.

Lead researcher Professor Andrew Neal said: “We noticed that as carbon is lost from soil, the pores within it become smaller and less connected. This results in fundamental changes in the flow of water, nutrients and oxygen through soil and forces several significant changes to microbial behaviour and metabolism. Low carbon, poorly connected soils are much less efficient at supporting growth and recycling nutrients.”

 

Offshore wind energy marine bird study boasts successful pilot year - JNCC

An offshore wind energy collaboration to better understand how large-scale development may impact marine birds has completed a successful pilot year, identifying high-priority ornithological knowledge gaps.

The Offshore Wind Strategic Monitoring and Research Forum (OWSMRF) led by six offshore wind developers – EDF-Renewables, Equinor, Ørsted, RWE (formerly innogy), ScottishPower Renewables, and Vattenfall – was launched 12 months ago following the announcement of the joint government-industry Offshore Wind Sector Deal which included plans to see offshore wind capacity reach 30 gigawatts (GW) by 2030.

Being delivered by JNCC, the initiative aims to improve the understanding of how UK marine bird populations are affected by offshore wind farms and reduce consenting risk for planned projects. The objective is to identify knowledge gaps and define high-priority scopes of work to address them.

Christie Paterson, Offshore Environmental Manager for ScottishPower Renewables, speaking on behalf of the offshore wind developers said:

“More large-scale renewable energy, like offshore wind, will be vital to the UK reaching its net zero targets and to slowing down the impacts of climate change. As more capacity is developed, it will be key to analyse the cumulative effects on the environment, which is why the industry is working together to better understand, and mitigate, potential impacts. “The first year focussed specifically on black-legged kittiwakes, and the work that was carried out will provide an important basis on which to prioritise further efforts to improve our understanding and to secure co-existence with offshore wind development.”

John Goold, Director of Marine at JNCC said: “JNCC is delighted by the success of the OWSMRF pilot year and is grateful to all participants for their willingness to come together in the spirit of collegiality to identify key evidence needs and research questions. We look forward to continued collaboration, seeing the benefits of OWSMRF realised and seeing more opportunities developed to support the needs of this important sector”.

The pilot year has been a collaborative process with invaluable input from academics, regulators, consultants and stakeholders, including Natural England, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB), the Marine Management Organisation, Marine Scotland, Scottish Natural Heritage and Natural Resources Wales.

 

Wildlife

Recovering pine marten benefits red squirrels, but the grey squirrel still persists in urban areas - Queen’s University Belfast

Research led by Queen’s has found that whilst red squirrels are responding positively to the increased presence of the pine marten in Ireland and Britain, its ability to control grey squirrel is limited by lack of forest and presence of urban refugia.

The research, carried out in partnership with National Museums Northern Ireland, has been published today (Monday 15 June) in Journal of Applied Ecology.

It found that despite the on-going recovery of the pine marten, and its ability to provide natural biological control of the invasive grey squirrel, isolated populations of grey squirrels in parklands in towns and cities are still likely to persist.

The study used data from 332 sites across Northern Ireland covering all sizes and shapes of woodlands in both urban and non-urban areas. To collect the data, a team of 70 citizen scientists deployed a camera trap at sites at randomly selected locations. The researchers used data to measure the co-occurrence of the species throughout the region. Models were then used to produce predictions of the future distribution of the three species. The probability of occurrence for each species was estimated in every 1km2 in Northern Ireland based on interactions between habitat suitability and the presence of other species.

The results predict that grey squirrels will still persist in parkland areas of towns and cities as pine martens were shown to be forest specialists and displayed strong avoidance of human settlement and disturbance in and around urban areas.

 

Where have the swans gone? - Netherlands Institute of Ecology

The research was only possible because of the code some swans carry. Sightings of these tagged animals - often by citizen scientists - offer insight into the whereabouts of individual swans and changes therein. In winter, the swans favour areas with an air temperature of 5.5 °C. Source: Bart Nolet/NIOO-KNAW
The research was only possible because of the code some swans carry. Sightings of these tagged animals - often by citizen scientists - offer insight into the whereabouts of individual swans and changes therein. In winter, the swans favour areas with an air temperature of 5.5 °C. Source: Bart Nolet/NIOO-KNAW

Wintering area Bewick's swans shifts hundreds of kilometres in 50 years

Nearly 13 kilometres per year: that is the rate at which the wintering area of Bewick's swans has shifted east over the past 50 years. It's a discovery with consequences for the conservation of this migratory species, writes a team of researchers led by the Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW) in Global Change Biology.

Why are Bewick's swans, a protected species, declining sharply in Ireland and Britain? And to a lesser extent also in the Netherlands, their main wintering area? "This decline in North-West Europe was not consistent with our data on breeding success and survival", says NIOO animal ecologist Rascha Nuijten. "That's why we started this research."

The first indication the researchers had, was that in Germany, the number of wintering swans was actually increasing rather than declining. To find out more, an international team was formed that also included members from Estonia and the United Kingdom (Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust).

 

Roadkill study identifies animals most at risk in Europe - University of Reading

Around 194 million birds and 29 million mammals are thought to be killed each year on European roads, according to a new study that has ranked the most vulnerable species.

European Badger. Credit Joaquim Pedro Ferreira
European Badger. Credit Joaquim Pedro Ferreira

An international research team used 90 roadkill surveys from 24 European countries to create a new method of estimating both the birds and mammal species killed most often on roads, and the species most vulnerable to being wiped out of certain areas.

The research, published in Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, found that the species killed most often were not necessarily the ones most vulnerable to disappearing completely. This means action to preserve wildlife when new roads are built risks being targeted at the wrong species based on current methods.

Dr Manuela Gonzalez-Suarez, an ecologist at the University of Reading, and co-author of the study, said: “Road densities in Europe are among the world’s highest, with 50% of the continent within 1.5km of a paved road or railway. Roads are therefore a significant threat to wildlife, and evidence shows deaths on them could even cause some species to disappear completely. Despite this, the long-term vulnerability of species is not currently considered when assessing the impact of new roads on wildlife, meaning we risk channeling support to the wrong species, doing nothing to help those most at risk. Better understanding which species are most vulnerable to roads is therefore important if we are to take more effective conservation action.”

The research team, led by the Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM) in Lisbon, calculated roadkill rates for 423 bird species and 212 mammal species. They found that small animals with high population densities and which reach maturity at an early age were most likely to be killed on roads. Nocturnal mammals and birds with a diet of predominantly of plants and seeds were also shown to have higher death rates.


Covid-19 lockdown reveals human impact on wildlife - University of St Andrews

An international team of scientists is investigating how animals are responding to reduced levels of human activity during the Covid-19 pandemic.
In an article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution today (22 June), the leaders of a new global initiative explain how research during this devastating health crisis can inspire innovative strategies for sharing space on this increasingly crowded planet, with benefits for both wildlife and humans.

Many countries around the world went into lockdown to control the spread of Covid-19. Brought about by the most tragic circumstances, this period of unusually reduced human mobility, which the article’s authors coined ‘anthropause’, can provide invaluable insights into human-wildlife interactions.

There have been countless posts on social media over the past few months reporting unusual wildlife encounters. Anecdotal observations, especially from metropolitan areas, suggest that nature has responded to lockdown. There not only seem to be more animals than usual, but there are also some surprising visitors: pumas have been spotted prowling the streets of downtown Santiago, Chile, and dolphins recently showed up in untypically calm waters in the harbour of Trieste, Italy.

Access the paper: Rutz, C. et al (2020) COVID-19 lockdown allows researchers to quantify the effects of human activity on wildlife. Nature Ecology and Evolution (open access) DOI: 10.1038/s41559-020-1237-z


Scientific Publications

Bartomeus , I, Molina, F. P., Hidalgo-Galiana, A. & Ortego, J. (2020) Safeguarding the genetic integrity of native pollinators requires stronger regulations on commercial lines. (open access) Ecological Solutions and Evidence, British Ecological Society. DOI: 10.1002/2688-8319.12012

 

Bergami Elisa, Rota Emilia, Caruso Tancredi, Birarda Giovanni, Vaccari Lisa and Corsi Ilaria Plastics everywhere: first evidence of polystyrene fragments inside the common Antarctic collembolan Cryptopygus antarcticus Biol. Lett.1620200093 doi.org/10.1098/rsbl.2020.0093

 

Plue, Jan, Cousins, Sara AO, De Pauw, Karen, Diekmann, Martin, Hagenblad, Jenny, Helsen, Kenny, Hermy, Martin, Liira, Jaan, Orczewska, Anna, Vanneste, Thomas, Wulf, Monika, and De Frenne, Pieter Biological Flora of the British Isles: Poa Nemoralis Journal of Ecology doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13402

 

Costanza Geppert et al. (2020): Agri-environment schemes enhance pollinator abundance and richness, but bumblebee reproduction depends on field size (open access) Journal of Applied Ecology DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.13682

George Bishop, David Styles, Piet N.L.Lens Recycling of European plastic is a pathway for plastic debris in the ocean Environment International doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2020.105893

 

Ken W. Smith & Linda Smith (2020) Long-term trends in the nest survival and productivity of the Lesser Spotted Woodpecker Dryobates minor in Britain, Bird Study, DOI: 10.1080/00063657.2020.1780195

 

Christidis, N., McCarthy, M. & Stott, P.A. The increasing likelihood of temperatures above 30 to 40 °C in the United Kingdom. Nat Commun 11, 3093 (2020). doi.org/10.1038/s41467-020-16834-0

 

Wildlife news.

Invertebrates

Butterflies emerge early thanks to the sunniest May on record - Butterfly Conservation

The warm spring weather, capped by the UK’s sunniest May since records began, has led to the early emergence of many butterfly species.

53 of the UK’s 59 resident and regular migrant butterfly species had already been spotted by the end of May this year, the first time this century that so many have been seen by the end of spring.

Dr Richard Fox, Associate Director of Recording and Research at the charity Butterfly Conservation, who compiled the figures, said: “Over the past 20 years, we’ve typically received reports of 39 species by the end of May, so 53 this year is amazing. Last year, for example, only 43 butterflies had put in an appearance by this point and the only other year to come close to the current total was in 2011, when 50 species had started to emerge by 31 May.”

The sightings, made by members of the public and displayed on Butterfly Conservation’s First Sightings web page, shows some extremely early dates for particular species this spring. The first Ringlet butterfly, for example, was reported on 24 May, but would not normally be seen before 8 June, while the White-letter Hairstreak spotted on 29 May typically doesn’t appear until 11 June. The Silver-washed Fritillary and White Admiral, classic butterflies of summer woodland in southern Britain, were both seen on 30 May, two weeks earlier than usual. The rare Large Blue, successfully reintroduced to Britain in the 1980s, made its earliest ever appearance this year.

The unusually early emergences aren’t necessarily a worry for these butterfly populations. Richard continues: “Butterflies are able to adjust their emergence dates to suit the vagaries of the UK weather, indeed they need to do so to remain in sync with the plants that their caterpillars need to feed on. However, the trend towards earlier emergence of butterflies and moths in Britain over recent decades in response to climate change isn’t necessarily beneficial. Recent research shows that emerging earlier leads to larger populations of species that have more than one generation each year. In such species, the earlier emergence of the first generation leads to greater abundance in the second brood. However, for species that only have one generation each year, this positive effect on numbers was not found. Indeed, for some, more specialized species, there was a negative impact – earlier emergence led to reduced population size.”

 

How did the UK’s bumblebees do in 2019? - Bumblebee Conservation Trust

BeeWalk is the Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s national bumblebee recording scheme. The scheme monitors the abundance of bumblebees across the UK. Read on for the 2019 results.

2019 was the biggest year yet for BeeWalk since the Trust started the scheme in 2008. The 2019 records are summarised in the latest BeeWalk Annual Report here.

Across Britain almost 500 people, mainly volunteer citizen scientists, walked transects at 587 different sites, an increase of 38 over the previous year. BeeWalkers submitted nearly 31,000 records and counted more than 97,000 individual bees during the year.

BeeWalk is unique as it allows staff at the Bumblebee Conservation Trust to see patterns and trends that can’t be extracted from any other dataset. The information collected is crucial to understanding that key question “How are the bumblebees doing?”.

The positive story coming from analysis of the 2019 results is the recovery of some of the UK’s rarest bumblebees. Three species – the Shrill carder bee (Bombus sylvarum), Brown-banded carder bee (Bombus humilis) and the Ruderal bumblebee (Bombus ruderatus) – are Continental European species at heart, and reach their northern range edge in Britain. All three appear to be responding positively to the combination of targeted conservation work and recent warm summers, and all three did relatively well during 2019.

Download the report (PDF)

Read more about BeeWalks in this article for CJS by the Bumblebee Conservation Trust

 

3D app brings UK bumblebees to life on your phone - Bumblebee Conservation Trust

What's That Bee app in hand (Bumblebee Conservation Trust)
What's That Bee app in hand (Bumblebee Conservation Trust)

A wildlife app launched today (Tuesday 30 June) by the Bumblebee Conservation Trust gives users a new view of bumblebees through an augmented reality 3D function.

The free ‘What’s that Bumblebee’ app lets people engage with nature in a different and fun way by bringing a three-dimensional bumblebee to virtual life in the user’s own garden or living room, for studying in detail and with the option of capturing images to send to family and friends.

The app also makes it easy for bumblebee-beginners to identify which of the UK’s most common eight species of these important pollinating insects may be buzzing around their garden or local park.

“In these difficult times, lots of people have been appreciating nature and wanting to find out more. What’s That Bumblebee makes it easy for people of all ages to discover and identify different bumblebees visiting their gardens, outdoor spaces, parks or window boxes,” said Andy Benson, the Bumblebee Conservation Trust’s Education Officer.

The app is available for Apple and Android, and works on compatible phones and tablets. It was developed by the Trust, with National Lottery Heritage Fund support.

In total there are 24 bumblebee species in the UK, but the most common ‘Big 8’ that people are most likely to see in their garden or park are the Buff-tailed bumblebee, Common carder bee, Early bumblebee, Garden bumblebee, Heath bumblebee, Red-tailed bumblebee, Tree bumblebee and White-tailed bumblebee.

 

Mammals

Conservationists bid to discover habits of nationally rare bat - North York Moors National Park Authority

The Alcathoe bat. Photo credit - Cyril Schönbächler
The Alcathoe bat. Photo credit - Cyril Schönbächler

Very little is known about one of Britain’s rarest mammals the Alcathoe bat, after it was first ‘discovered’ in the country 10 years ago, but thanks to the support of energy bar brand, CLIF, conservationists from the North York Moors National Park Authority are looking to change that.

The tiny bat, very similar to the Whiskered and Brandt's Bats, was only confirmed as a separate species in Europe in 2001 following genetic analysis. It was then ‘discovered’ in the UK in 2010 but is thought to have existed here much longer.

Thanks to a £10,000 grant from CLIF, the Authority’s Ryevitalise team is soon to embark on an ambitious citizen science project to capture peoples’ interest and develop a deeper understanding of how Alcathoe bats and other species use the habitats, particularly veteran and ancient trees, in and around the project area. This knowledge will help the team to enhance and protect the special area of the Rye catchment now and for future generations.

Alexandra Cripps, Ryevitalise Programme Manager, said: “This is a huge boost for our Small and Tall; the Rye’s Bats and Ancient Trees project. Thanks to CLIF and the ‘National Parks Protectors’ partnership we will be able to engage with the community and partners to collect vital information we need to inform habitat management practices, enhancing and protecting bat populations and other wildlife in the area for future generations.

“We cannot wait to get the project started as volunteers will play a key role in what will be an ambitious landscape scale Citizen Science project. So little is known about the Alcathoe bat that it is currently considered 'Data Deficient' on the global IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. We really want to change that and help other bat populations within River Rye catchment area thrive.”

 

Helpline heroes rescue 63 baby bats struck by heat wave - Bat Conservation Trust

Some of the baby bats found by Tim. (c) Steve Parker
Some of the baby bats found by Tim. (c) Steve Parker

Bat rescuers have been called out to an unusual case of 63 baby bats found in daylight and struggling in the heat wave this week.

On Wednesday alarmed Manchester resident Tim Eaton started finding tiny pipistrelle bat pups falling to the ground from his roof, seemingly due to their loft maternity roost becoming too hot during the day. Many more were still inside the roost, apparently abandoned by their mothers.

He said: “I came home around 1.45pm on Wednesday and found 1 bat outside my back door. That was just the start! After ringing the RSPCA they put me in touch with the Bat Helpline. During the next couple of hours myself and my daughters found 40 plus bats! I contacted South Lancashire Bat Group and with their help we counted 60 plus young bats!

Maisy Inston from the emergency National Bat Helpline said: “When the caller rang there were 16 bats walking around on the ground. Lots more were exposed on the roof. Babies were falling down into the garden. Bats were also falling into the neighbour’s property. The caller was calm but wanted to know what to do. We advised him on how to safely contain all the grounded bats in a shoebox, wearing gloves. We put him in touch with bat carers from South Lancashire Bat Group who came to the rescue.”

 

Essex beavers give birth to two healthy kits - Environment Agency

A natural flood management scheme in Essex has seen its "work force" double after the birth of two healthy kits.

Back in 2019 a pair of Eurasian Beavers were welcomed back to Essex for the first time in 400 years to help reduce flood risk in Finchingfield.

18 months on we are thrilled to announce the pioneering partnership project with the Environment Agency, Spains Hall Estate, the Essex & Suffolk Rivers Trust, Essex Wildlife Trust, and the Anglian Eastern Regional Flood and Coastal Committee (RFCC) has been a big success - and now there are four extra paws to help them continue their vital flood defence work.

The beaver duo, recently named Woody and Willow, have been working relentlessly over the last year in their Finchingfield enclosure on the historic Spains Hall Estate.

They have been building dams to reduce flood risk to the village and creating wetlands which release water during drier periods.

This is complemented by a human-made natural flood management scheme on a second strand of Finchingfield Brook, which features a “leaky dam” approach.

This consists of securing tree branches or trunks across a watercourse, which helps slow the flow after heavy rain.

We are excited to see how much more the beavers manage with the additional help.

Spains Hall Estate Manager Archie Ruggles-Brise said he was excited to see how much more protection the new additions to the beaver family will bring. He said: “We are delighted that our beavers have settled in so well that they have bred successfully. We always hoped that their woodland home would provide the right habitat to support a family, and the arrival of two kits is fantastic news. If they are anything like their parents the two kits will become phenomenal dam builders, and we will be watching closely as they expand the wetland and provide even more protection against flood and drought, and provide homes for loads of other wildlife. We are fortunate to have wildlife photographer, Russell Savory, keeping a close eye on the family, and providing everyone with such inspiring insights into their watery world.”

 

Ministers urged to relocate beavers and end the culling - Trees for Life

The Scottish Parliament will have the opportunity to ensure a better future for Scotland’s beavers today, says a coalition of leading environmental charities.

The Scottish Rewilding Alliance is calling on MSPs in Holyrood to vote to ban the licensed killing of beavers in Scotland at least until their conservation status is clearly secured.

The Alliance is urging the Scottish Government to back the ban and to allow beavers to be relocated from areas where they affect agriculture to areas where landowners would actively welcome them.

If lethal control continues at 2019 levels, there would be serious concerns about beavers’ long-term future in Scotland, say experts. Scottish Natural Heritage recently announced it had issued licences for 87 beavers – one-fifth of the Scottish population – to be shot in Tayside in the months following the Government’s May 2019 decision to give beavers protected status in Scotland.

Today’s Holyrood vote will be on an amendment by Mark Ruskell MSP to the Scottish Government’s Animals and Wildlife (Penalties, Protections and Powers) (Scotland) Bill. The amendment would prevent the licensed killing of beavers unless the Government is sure the species has reached a favourable conservation status in Scotland – something currently unknown.

“Just a year ago the Scottish Government told us that beavers would be protected in Scotland, and that beavers were hugely important to the country’s biodiversity. But with a fifth of our population of these special animals killed in just a few months last year, the Scottish Natural Heritage-operated licensing regime seems little better than a free-for-all,’ said Steve Micklewright, Convener of the Scottish Rewilding Alliance and chief executive of conservation charity Trees for Life. “Beavers’ activities around our waterways help protect our towns and cities against flooding, and they restore wetlands and create habitats for a wealth of wildlife. Occasionally, as in Tayside, they can have local impacts on agriculture too, and Ministers are putting landowners around the Tay in an impossible position by blocking beavers’ relocation to other more suitable areas of Scotland. We urge Parliament to support a ban on killing beavers, given their fragile conservation status here, and we’re calling on the Scottish Government to let those beavers in more controversial locations be relocated to areas where landowners would welcome their return for the first time since the sixteenth century.”

 

Could you help stop mink in their tracks? - Scottish Natural Heritage

A major project working across the Highlands, the Scottish Invasive Species Initiative, is looking for people to get involved in work to help remove American mink from the countryside.

Mink ©Liam Skinner
Mink ©Liam Skinner

The invasive American mink was brought to Scotland for fur-farming in 1938 and, as a consequence of both escapes and deliberate releases, became established in the wild in the 1960s. Mink are opportunistic and ferocious hunters taking whatever prey is available to them - often killing more than they require for food at that time. Their presence in the countryside has a devastating effect on native Scottish wildlife, particularly ground nesting birds and water vole populations.

Ben Seaman, with the Cromarty Firth Fishery Trust, said: “We monitor for mink presence using a network of mink rafts which are looked after by volunteers. We already have a great volunteer team running rafts for us, but we have gaps in the network we’d like to fill - in particular, we’d love more help along the Cromarty Firth and the Dornoch Firth. So if anyone living in Cromarty, Invergordon, Alness and Evanton areas or in Bonar Bridge, Dornoch, Loch Fleet and Golspie areas is interested in getting involved they should get in touch for more information.”

Monitoring a mink raft requires no previous experience and is easy to do. The local team provide all equipment, full training at the start, will help set the raft up and are always contactable if you need help or advice. All training and activities are carried out in accordance with the current Scottish Government and NHS coronavirus guidance.

The raft contains a clay pad hidden inside a tunnel and the tell-tale sign of mink presence is when they leave their footprints in the clay as they explore inside the tunnel. Once a raft is set up the volunteer just needs to check it for footprints every couple of weeks. If mink are detected a live-capture trap is set and the mink caught before being humanely despatched by the local team.

   

Birds

Six general licences re-issued for the control of wild birds - Defra

Licences reissued on a temporary basis ahead of new licences coming into force on 1 January 2021.

Defra has today (18 June) announced that six general licences for the control of wild birds will be reissued on a temporary basis ahead of new licences coming into force on 1 January 2021.

The current licences GL26, GL28, GL31, GL34, GL35 and GL36 will be reissued from 1 August to 31 December. No action is required by licence users, beyond the ongoing requirement to act in accordance with the licence conditions.

Defra announced a longer-term review of general licensing in June 2019 which has made significant progress. The re-issue period is necessary to thoroughly analyse the evidence and to fully develop a general licensing solution for protected sites.

Defra is committed to achieving a general licensing regime for wild birds which is both robust and workable for users, ensuring that longer-term licensing arrangements are informed by the best available evidence. As part of the process, Defra will seek Natural England’s statutory advice.

Statement following DEFRA’s latest announcement on General Licences - Countryside Alliance

The Countryside Alliance, Moorland Association and National Gamekeepers Organisation have welcomed the announcement by DEFRA that six General Licences for the control of wild birds will be reissued on a temporary basis ahead of new licences coming into force on 1 January 2021.

The current General Licences had been due to expire on July 31st.

The decision comes in the wake of a joint paper, “Wildlife Licencing in England: Chaos, Crises and Cure” that was sent by the three organisations to DEFRA Secretary of State, George Eustice, at the beginning of this month.

The paper highlighted the complete chaos with which Natural England has overseen wildlife licensing, both through the General Licences and Individual Licences. Until last year, predator control on European protected sites was possible under the General Licence, but since then people hoping to protect wildlife in protected sites have been forced to apply for an Individual Licence.

At a recent meeting, Natural England revealed that since January this year they have received 1,200 applications for Individual Licences, but to date had only managed to evaluate 700, with just 73 of those granting conservation action. Most of those only granted some but not all of the planned activity.

Furthermore, many of those successful applications have been issued with conditions that make them unworkable: such as not allowing predatory gulls to be shot if the practitioner is within 750m of the nest site they are looking to protect.

73 approved licences out of 1,200 applications is a success rate of just 6%. The catastrophic handling of Individual Licences by Natural England has therefore meant that conservation action on protected sites, often designated for their populations of vulnerable red listed species, is down by 94%. One bird to suffer has been the curlew, the species of highest conservation concern in the United Kingdom. This is unacceptable from the Government’s advisor for the natural environment of England, with responsibility for protecting our nature and landscapes.

 

Hopes rise for hen harrier breeding - The Moorland Association

(image: The Moorland Association)
(image: The Moorland Association)

Hopes of a successful breeding season rose today after moorland estates managed for red grouse across the North of England have reported an encouraging number of Hen Harrier nests on their land.

These include six nests in Lancashire, four nests in Cumbria and two nests in Yorkshire.

The dozen nests reported so far this year already matches the total number of successful nests in 2019 from all types of land – which was in itself a record-breaking year with 47 chicks fledging from 12 nests, the majority on grouse moors.

Amanda Anderson, Director of the Moorland Association, said: “This is very encouraging news and further evidence that birds of prey are welcome on land managed for grouse shooting by our members. We obviously have to wait to see how many of the chicks fledge successfully, but the signs are promising that 2020 will be another good year for Hen Harrier breeding. It is heartening to see the bird doing better in the north of England with the help of gamekeepers protecting it from predators and encouraging a healthy habitat teaming with prey species. Whilst there is a long way to go, we believe we are on the right track as we try to rebuild the harrier population.”

The government-led joint action plan to aid Hen Harrier recovery has led to 99 chicks since 2016 thanks to partnership collaboration, with 81 of those chicks fledging in the last two years since an innovative Brood Management Trial was launched. Successful nests have increased by 100% since 2015.

 

The seabird colony vanishes - British Trust for Ornithology

The UK’s largest breeding colony of Arctic Terns has vanished and scientists need help to find out where the birds have gone.

At this time of year, the tern colony on the Skerries, a group of rocky islets to the north of Anglesey, should be teeming with life, with adult birds noisily shuttling back and forth to sea to feed their growing chicks. This is the UK’s largest colony of Arctic Terns (home to 2,814 breeding pairs in 2019) – an elegant species known for their record-breaking pole to pole migrations from their northern breeding grounds to Antarctica, for the southern hemisphere summer. Arctic Terns experience more daylight than any other animal on Earth. Several hundred Common Terns also normally breed on the Skerries.
In 2020, this RSPB-managed seabird sanctuary has fallen silent. Because of the Covid-19 pandemic there are – for the first time in over a decade – no summer wardens living on the islands and, in the absence of this human presence, Peregrine Falcons have taken up residence. The RSPB believes that disturbance from the Peregrines is almost certainly the main cause of the desertion of the colony. The question is, where have the birds gone?
Scientists are hoping that watchful members of the public might be able to answer that question. Since 2013, a team of bird ringers licensed by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO) and supported by RSPB have been attaching individually coded leg flags to a number of terns each season. These leg flags, which are orange with a black code for Arctic Terns and yellow with a black code for Common Terns, can be read with binoculars or a telescope. People lucky enough to observe them can report their sightings and therefore help track the terns’ movements.

 

Results show ‘small win’ for Turtle Doves in National Park, but more needed to prevent extinction - North York Moors National Park Authority

Turtle Dove North York Moors Forest Spring 2020. Credit Richard Baines
Turtle Dove North York Moors Forest Spring 2020. Credit Richard Baines

Surveys carried out by staff and volunteers for the North York Moors National Park Authority have indicated that Turtle Dove numbers within the National Park have remained relatively consistent for the last four years.

This is a good, be it small, win for a species that is at risk of global extinction and is still considered to be the UK’s fastest declining bird.

Since 2016, the North Yorkshire Turtle Dove Project, a scheme funded by the National Lottery Heritage Fund, National Park Authority and other partners, has been carrying out surveys alongside a dedicated conservation team and over 70 volunteers. It has also involved working with farmers and landowners to create and improve habitats that can benefit the species.

Ecologist Richard Baines, who leads the project said: “We are now mid-way through our surveys for 2020 monitoring 20 of our one km squares which we visit every year. The first signs are very good and we have had presence recorded in over 60% of visits. Virtually all of the sites we surveyed for the first time in 2016 still have Turtle Doves. This is great news as the species is still declining fast across Europe and is consequently listed by Birdlife International as vulnerable, having suffered a massive decline across its breeding range.”

 

And finally some competition winners

Scotland’s In Tune With Nature winners announced - Scottish Natural Heritage

Rum National Nature Reserve (SNH)
Rum National Nature Reserve (SNH)

Twelve winners of In Tune with Nature, a national contest for musicians of all genres to show their love of nature, were announced today.

Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) and Fèis Rois partnered up on this first-ever competition for Scotland to inspire people to connect with nature by writing songs inspired by the coasts and waters of Scotland’s beautiful nature reserves.

Entrants composed music ranging from classical to pop with songs written in Gaelic, Scots, Shetland dialect and English.

The competition, called In Tune with Nature, was judged by a panel of well-known faces from the Scottish music industry, including Julie Fowlis; Vic Galloway; Gill Maxwell; and Karine Polwart, and is part of the celebrations for the Year of Coasts and Waters 2020.

Broadcaster, author and musician, Vic Galloway said: “This has been an interesting and satisfying project to be involved in, and I was honoured to be asked to assess so many brilliant applicants. Although it has been an epic task listening to almost 150 musical compositions, I've loved the sheer passion and diversity of music on offer - from classical to traditional, acoustic song writing to electronica, spoken word to rock, and way beyond. For these stunning Scottish nature reserves, I think we have some worthy winners and some extraordinary music to accompany them."

 

10 breathtaking Scottish landscape images for 2020 - John Muir Trust

Enjoy these 'Living Landscape Prize' winning shots from the Scottish Landscape Photographer of the Year competition

the winning image by Kenneth Muir
the winning image by Kenneth Muir

We are delighted to feature the ten winning entries for the latest John Muir Trust Living Landscape Prize – one of the categories in the prestigious Scottish Landscape Photographer of the Year (SLPOTY) competition.

The Trust team selected their favourites from a final shortlist and we congratulate all ten winners for their superb 'Living Landscape' images - including Inverness-based medical doctor Kenneth Muir (his image is above) who was named overall winner and Scottish Landscape Photographer of the Year by the SLPOTY judges.

Click through to see all ten amazing photos.

 

How to get your news to us:

Send your press releases to newsdesk@countryside-jobs.com or email a link to items on your website.

If it's time sensitive we can embargo the details to a specific date, let us know when you'd like it to be published. 

 


Training.

Browse the Training Directory online here for short courses (up to 10 days long), or here for longer courses, distance learning and centres and providers

The Directory includes a wide range of courses providing certification in practical skills such as chainsaw use, need to learn how to identify dragonflies, or want to find out the best way to get the community involved in your project then this is the section to read.    We include details of many professional courses in the online short courses pages. There are also sections for longer courses, training centres and other events (eg conferences).

Search for your next CPD course here.

 


Recently added online events and learning

 

Online Events

18/07/2020 Hen Harrier Day Wales 2020 at Online 1 Day

Mountain Escapes Contact: c-js.info/31O6k5l

21/07/2020 Climate and Biodiversity Crises: Professional Approaches and Practical Actions at Online 1 Day

CIEEM Contact: c-js.info/2VP0UDc

This conference will demonstrate that “No one is too small to make a difference” - Greta Thunberg – when it comes to the future of our planet. We must seize the opportunity that Covid-19 has inadvertently given us and act now if we want to ensure a ‘green recovery’ and guarantee a better future.

 

Online Learning - Short Courses and Webinars

17/07/2020 Acoustic ID - Horseshoes & Barbastelle 1 Day

Online, BatAbility Courses & Tuition 07877570590 neil.middleton@batability.co.uk

90 minute 'Lunch-bite' webinar, at your own desk.

To book, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/batability-courses-amp-tuition-18212558699

Cost £30.00+VAT

21/07/2020 Zero Carbon Britain: Live online 2 Days

Machynlleth, Wales, Centre for Alternative Technology 01660 704966 courses@cat.org.uk www.cat.org.uk/events/zero-carbon-britain-live-online/

Working with local Councils, we have developed a two day, interactive, online course offering an in-depth look at CAT?s flagship research project, Zero Carbon Britain. Connect with a network of others working and studying in the field and explore the radical changes needed to rise to the climate challenge.

Cost £50

22/07/2020 Ecology - Coaching & Mentoring Skills 1 Day

Online, BatAbility Courses & Tuition 07877570590 neil.middleton@batability.co.uk

90 minute 'Lunch-bite' webinar, at your own desk.

To book, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/batability-courses-amp-tuition-18212558699

Cost £30.00+VAT

24/07/2020 Ecological Foundation Training 3 Days

Online, 3-day course to prepare you for a job in ecology or environmental sector. The course will cover species ID, surveying, reporting and job workshop. Species included are mammals, amphibians, reptiles and raptors. Book via our website or email Ally for more information.

Cost £350

07/08/2020 Ecological Foundation Training 3 Days

Online, 3-day course to prepare you for a job in ecology or environmental sector. The course will cover species ID, surveying, reporting and job workshop. Species included are mammals, amphibians, reptiles and raptors. Book via our website or email Ally for more information.

Cost £350

Above two courses with Ochil Ecological Training. Contact ochiltrainingenterprises@outlook.com c-js.info/2YSI7rk

20/08/2020 Acoustic ID - Noctule, Leisler's & Serotine 1 Day

Online, BatAbility Courses & Tuition 07877570590 neil.middleton@batability.co.uk

90 minute 'Lunch-bite' webinar, at your own desk.

To book, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/batability-courses-amp-tuition-18212558699

Cost £30.00+VAT

21/08/2020 Ecological Foundation Training 3 Days

Online, Ochil Ecological Training ochiltrainingenterprises@outlook.com c-js.info/2YSI7rk

3-day course to prepare you for a job in ecology or environmental sector. The course will cover species ID, surveying, reporting and job workshop. Species included are mammals, amphibians, reptiles and raptors. Book via our website or email Ally for more information.

Cost £350

01/09/2020 Using drones to map habitats 2 Days

Online, c-js.info/2v4TOwp

This two-day interactive online course gives you skills in taking images collected from a UAV platform, processing images into a scene for image processing, generating classified images. You will learn steps to produce high quality and accurate maps for mapping vegetation and land forms.

22/09/2020 Transforming Environmental Data in R 2 Days

Online, UKCEHtraining@ceh.ac.uk c-js.info/317vCcn

The 2-day interactive online course will help you understand the benefits of data transformation tools. You will learn about auditable workflows, repeatability, time-saving, improving efficiency & reduced risk of dataloss. You will participate in practical data transformation exercises using real environmental datasets to combine & manipulate datasets for analysis-ready data.

Above two courses with Centre for Ecology & Hydrology. Contact: 01491 69 2225 UKCEHtraining@ceh.ac.uk

25/09/2020 Acoustic ID - Myotis & Plecotus 1 Day

Online, BatAbility Courses & Tuition 07877570590 neil.middleton@batability.co.uk

90 minute 'Lunch-bite' webinar, at your own desk.

To book, please go to: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/batability-courses-amp-tuition-18212558699

Cost £30.00+VAT

11/11/2020 How to write highly cited papers 1 Day

Online, Centre for Ecology & Hydrology 01491 69 2225 UKCEHtraining@ceh.ac.uk c-js.info/2vT2Ujq

This interactive online workshop will boost your confidence and ability to write a great science paper that will be cited again and again. This workshop focusses on getting high citations. The workshop will study the following using group and individual exercises. from £179. 2 morning sessions.

Various Unlocking your wildlife career

Online, Dr Kayleigh Fawcett Williams c-js.info/3izM2lQ

Are you a wildlife student or early career wildlife professional? Are you struggling to get a paid or long term wildlife role? Do you want to stop feeling stuck & learn what you can do to move forward in your wildlife career? YES? This free webinar is for you!

 

Online Learning - Longer Courses

Project Management for Wildlife Conservation at WildTeam

This is an online training workshop, run over 6 weeks (3 hours/week), with weekly live teaching sessions and pre-recorded training videos to work through in your own time.  Developed specifically for wildlife conservationists, you will learn the project management skills to increase the efficiency and impact of any conservation project. 7th September – 12th October (3 hours learning each week) 2 live sessions available each week: 10am or 6pm [BST] £180 full price – bursaries available.

Strategy Development for Wildlife Conservation at WildTeam

This is an online training workshop, run over 6 weeks (3 hours/week), with weekly live teaching sessions and pre-recorded training videos to work through in your own time. Working with our experienced team you will learn the skills to design conservation strategies which have more impact. 26th October – 30th November (3 hours learning each week) 2 live sessions available each week: 10am or 6pm [BST] £180 full price – bursaries available.

Above two courses with WildTeam. Contact: www.wildteam.org.uk/online Beth@wildteam.org.uk

 

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