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Seabed recovers more quickly following extreme storms than from the impacts of bottom-towed fishing, study suggests - University of Plymouth

pink sea fan and lots of new shoots in the mud
By 2016 there had been a good deal of recovery and both adult and juvenile pink sea fans were in evidence (Credit University of Plymouth)

Extreme storms can result in major damage to the seabed similar to that caused by prolonged periods of bottom-towed fishing, according to new research. However, important seabed habitats and species recover more quickly following extreme storms than in the wake of such fishing activity.

That is one of the key findings of a first-of-its-kind study which examined the impact of the 2013/14 winter storms on the Lyme Bay Marine Protected Area (MPA), off the coast of southern England.

Academics from the University of Plymouth have been monitoring the area using underwater cameras and other techniques since 2008, when a ban on bottom towed fishing was introduced as part of a range of conservation measures.

They have previously demonstrated that several species have returned to the area since the MPA was introduced, resulting in the significant recovery of seabed life and fish and shellfish stocks.

However, there have been no previous studies looking at how extreme storms impact seabed habitats or the potential for MPAs to increase ecosystem resilience from storms.

To address that, researchers analysed the impacts of the 2013/14 series of storms, which separate studies by the University found to be the most energetic to hit western Europe since 1948.

Through annual surveys of seabed life in the MPA, they were able to see the immediate impact of the storms but also how the seabed was able to recover in subsequent years.

Writing in Frontiers in Marine Science, the researchers say that with extreme events likely to become more frequent and severe as a result of climate change, up to 29% of coastal reef MPAs around the UK may be similarly impacted by extreme storms.

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